Pharmacology is the study of the interactions that occur between a living organism and chemicals that affect normal or abnormal biochemical function

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Why is there only adrenoreceptors and no active adrenergic innervation in bronchus and uterus?

Our bronchus and uterus has beta adrenoreceptors, but they have no active sympathetic nervous system innervation in these organs. Was there a sympathetic innervation in trachea and uterus, earlier, ...
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180 views

How to define drug-resistant or -sensitive cell line when knowing the IC50 values?

I have got the IC50 data for a drug on different cell lines. How to define if the cell line is sensitive or resistant towards this drug? Could anyone tell me how to define this?
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56 views

By what mechanism does Risperidone swell breast tissue?

There has been much talk of the anti-psychotic drug Rispeirdone causing un-natural breast tissue growth as well as galactorhea (milk production). Especially in young men and boys. What is the ...
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224 views

Is there a specific mechanism for the delivery of pain medication?

For example, when one takes aspirin or ibuprofen does the chemical get dispersed to all pain receptor? My question really is, how does the chemical know where to target in the body? I figure wherever ...
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1answer
4k views

Do Penicillin based antibiotics affect birth control?

I wasn't sure whether to ask this question on Biology or Chemistry Stack Exchange, since it is really biochemisty, but this is something that's been puzzling me. Most pharmacists (all that I've ...
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1answer
87 views

What microscope/magnification would I need to observe P. Acnes bacteria?

I am currently attempting to grow a culture of P. Acnes bacteria. Right now, my only hope in identifying colonies of the bacteria in the culture is to use a black light to find colonies that glow ...
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172 views

negatively charged albumin as major carrier of acidic/negative charged drugs in blood

I reading that orsomucoid (alpha-1-acid glycoprotein) is the major carrier of positively charged (basic) drugs in the blood, while albumin carries negatively charged (acidic) and drugs with neutral ...
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1answer
67 views

How does steroid dependence occur?

I have seen on the internet that prolonged steriod treatment can result in the development of steroid drug tolerance leading to decreased hormone secretion. In turn this may lead to drug dependence, ...
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1answer
44 views

Spironolactone's role with adrenergic agents in heart failure?

I am studying the treatment plan of adrenergic agents for heart failure. Then, in the group discussion, spironolactone was included. But I cannot understand how it is relevant when considering ...
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1answer
48 views

Anesthetics, specifically inhaled anesthetics

I have had a look at previous inhaled anesthetics and many of them appear to be fluorocarbons. What could be the mechanism behind fluorine's anesthetic properties? Is it the specific bonding pattern ...
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54 views

Are ipratropium and tolterodine parasympatholytic?

They are nonselective cholinoblockers and antimuscarinic. Other cholinoblockers of parasympaticus, which I know, are parasympatholytic such as atropine, butylscopolamine, trihexyphenidyl, titropium ...
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404 views

Differentiation of norepinephrine and epinephrine in indications

Norepinephrine is less beta2 adrenomimetic than epinephrine so more selective so less bronchospasm so may be therofore better in treatment of cardiac failure and different shocks. However, I am not ...
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49 views

How can Pyridostigmine have the indication of Myasthenia?

I am thinking how pyridostigmine can be used in the treatment of myasthenia gravis. Its similar compound (neostigmine) is also anticholine esterase. This compound has the indication of myasthenia ...
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77 views

To understand side-effects for nebivolol's beta1 selective pathway in PubChem? [closed]

Assume you have a drug nebivolol. When nebivolol is used as beta1 selective drug, beta2 is mostly for side effects, but this is not clear from PubChem. I do not know any cases where nebivolol is used ...
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1answer
71 views

Clonidine's adrenonergic nature?

I am little confused here. I used the term adrenoagonist and sympatholytic to describe the compound. However, my teacher says that the correct term here is adrenomimetic -term. My understanding of ...
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1answer
216 views

What is the mechanism of action of lithium-induced polyuria?

I was reading in my pharmacology textbook on lithium in treating bipolar disorder, and I was curious to know if there was any specific action lithium takes to produce symptoms such as polyuria and ...
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1answer
85 views

Salbutamol's Pathways of Interaction and Classification

Salbutamol is a very commonly used direct-acting β2-agonist. This suggests me that it is sympatholytic. However, it has sympathomimetic pathways, see PubChem for Sympathomimetic. I am trying to ...
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1answer
39 views

Ephedrine or pseudoephedrine indirectly central alpha2 mimetic?

I started to think this problem by first thinking if the alpha2 mimetism is possible in either case. It seems to be indirectly in either one. Ephedrine seems to have more prominent effect in CNS. ...
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44 views

Is Norepinephrine beta2 adrenomimetic?

I know that it has alpha1, alpha2 and beta1 effects. It has beta2 receptor where epinephrine can effect. However, to say that it is beta adrenomimetic, I am not sure. That is ligand binding beta2 ...
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1answer
105 views

How can succinylcholine cause myorelaxation?

I first thought that this is because of prolonged depolarisations. However, I am not sure anymore, because after reading PubChem, the only possible pathways are are Choline agonist. So I would say ...
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30 views

Why is drug clearance not affected by blood flow in case of low extraction ratios?

Background information: 1) Variation of organ blood flow: a) for drugs with low extraction ratio (<0.3): the venous drug concentration is virtually identical to the arterial concentration ...
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1answer
34 views

What is the most common way of administering loop diuretics and what is their time course of action?

I am reviewing some material on loop diuretics, and I am curious to know how these drugs are administered. Also, I am interested in knowing their time course of action once they are administered into ...
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1answer
42 views

Does vitamin D form crystals in the blood with calcium and magnesium?

I read on a vitamin-D product (2000NE) that I should not use calcium and magnesium with it, because it can result crystal formation in the blood. I googled, but find anything about this. Is it true? ...
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133 views

Why does caffeine give you so much energy, while being so low on calories?

There's definitely something I'm missing here. Since calories is a unit of measurement for energy, and caffeine seemingly gives you a lot, how can the labels on caffeinated products have such a low ...
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1answer
61 views

What are the reactions in the body that triggers dizziness after cigar(nicotine) smoking in non-smokers?

Suppose there is a person that has never used nicotine in any form in his/her life. Why does the person get dizzy after a few "shots" from a cigar(nicotine)? What's the difference between using other ...
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1answer
29 views

What enables azacitidine to incorporate into both DNA and RNA?

I did a mini-project on the drug azacitidine for my pharmacology class, and I learned that azacitidine has the ability to incorporate into both DNA and RNA. I think this is really unique because a ...
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1answer
53 views

Concentration of caffeine in physiologically relevant setting

Caffeine is known to overcome G2/M (and possibly other types of) cell cycle arrest through its effects on DNA repair machinery and is used as a positive control in studies of cell cycle arrest. In ...
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1answer
95 views

Difference between medicinal caffeine and regular caffeine

There are some OTC paracetamol tablets, some with caffeine. Is this caffeine the same as the regular caffeine (found in a coffee)? Does it perform better than it in any way?
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1answer
144 views

Which immunosuppression caused by long-term usage of these antibiotics in untreated celiac disease?

These antibiotics include amoxicillin + acidum clavulanicum (beta-lactam, inhibit cell wall synthesis, broad specturm, 3rd gen aminopenicillin) / last part preventing the resistance ceftriaxone (3rd ...
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2answers
242 views

Is there a known glucosepane cross-link breaker?

I read the following on wikipedia: There is, however, no agent known that can break down the most common AGE, glucosepane, which appears 10 to 1,000 times more common in human tissue than any ...
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1answer
9 views

What studies are there showing the effectiveness of any substance on canine hypertension?

Searching on http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov I could only find the article titled as "Telmisartan Treatment of Refractory Proteinuria in a Dog".
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150 views

What are the psychedelic effects of (star) anise and how many people are affected?

Backstory: My girlfriend reacts heavily to chocolate and drinks containing stellar anise, in a way that seems comparable to psychedelic drugs. After consuming it, it takes approximately five minutes ...
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1answer
104 views

How does fluorouracil inhibit pyrimidine synthesis?

I was reading in my pharmacology textbook about fluorouracil, and my book mentioned that fluorouracil is an antimetabolite whose function is to inhibit pyrimidine synthesis. However, I was curious to ...
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522 views

Why do different pain killers have different effects on people?

I've noticed some pain killers working great for me, while others have no effect. Works for me Aspirin APC † Naproxen Doesn't work for me Paracetamol Diclofenac Tramadol I doubt there ...
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42 views

Thermochemistry of gabapentin

So I am taking a new class at my institution called Theoretic Nuclear Thermochemical Pharmacology, (I know big name, it's an elective from a real pioneering fronteirsman in our department :P) and I am ...
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1answer
24 views

Meta-analysis of fruits in blocking Cytochrome family

My professor says that some drugs cannot be used with grapefruit. I am trying to search a list of cytochromes and their effect to block members in the cytochrome family. Some in Cyt P450. What is ...
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1answer
50 views

How are drug metabolism and detection related?

If someone is taking treatment for a psychiatric disorder (e.g. diazepine), then would traces of the metabolized drug be detectable in their sweat or saliva? Any links to resources regarding this, ...
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1answer
110 views

What is meant by drug tolerance?

What is meant by drug tolerance? This question is in my biology textbook for IGCSE and I have no idea what drug tolerance is. It would be very helpful if someone could clarify. Thank you.
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2answers
65 views

Pharmacology: Drug Administration

Why is the enteral route seem by far the most common way to administer a drug to the body?
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1answer
1k views

Pharmacokinetics: why do certain drugs follow zero-order kinetics?

I understand that alcohol and phenytoin are two examples of drugs that follow zero-order kinetics. Why do these two particular drugs follow zero-order kinetics as opposed to first-order kinetics?
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1answer
66 views

Applying drugs to brain via scalp (transdermal)

Many medications are intended only for the brain, but are taken orally. Hence <10% finds its intended target, while the remaining >90% is at best wasted, and at worst causes unwanted side-effects. ...
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2answers
50 views

Compatibility drugs info

Let's suppose that I take a DrugA for ProblemA and then I got this ProblemB and started to take DrugB. Are there general rules I can look up to figure out whether I can take DrugA & DrugB ...
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72 views

Is there any completely Computation Drug ever launched in market?

I am working in bioinformatics(part of it in Drug Designing) for years, still if I have no idea about it. As it is too hard to prove (Pass all Clinical trials) and get FDA Approvals. So, My question ...
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1answer
501 views

What is LD50 for 25i (25I-NBOMe)?

Firstly I would like to apologise if this is not correct place to ask this question, as it can be seen more as chemistry and not biology question. I was looking around for data on psychedelic ...
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1answer
92 views

Can neurotransmitter depletion cause short-term drug tolerance?

I'm curious to know if neurotransmitter degradation factors into drug tolerance and neural conduction and, if so, to what extent. As I recall from textbooks I read as an undergrad, one mechanism of ...
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1answer
422 views

How does Sodium Valproate cause neural plasticity

I have been reading a fascinating paper: Valproate reopens critical-period learning of absolute pitch 18 individuals were given Sodium Valproate (VPA) for a fortnight during which they trained on a ...
2
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1answer
113 views

Mesoporous silica particles as anti cancer drug delivery method

If this question is a little off topic for Biology, I'm sorry. I've recently read a lot about mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a promising drug delivery method. The huge range of customizability of ...
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2answers
88 views

Classify chemotherapy drugs?

I'm studying a TCGA dataset trying to find correlations between gene expression and clinical data which might shed light on some pathways. One column of the clinical data provides a list of ...
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1answer
127 views

Does tea have its effect if you have a sleep after drinking it?

If I drink tea, then go to sleep for a while, when I wake up, will the effect of tea still be on me (the refreshing effect)? Does it depend on the duration of sleep?
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226 views

Pharmacology Half Life Calculation

I'm really stuck on this question. I'm being asked to find the half life of a drug. The Vd is 50L/kg. The clearance is 0.1 L/hr/kg. The patient weighs 70 kg. Equation is: T1/2 (halflife) = 0.693 * ...