Pharmacology is the study of the interactions that occur between a living organism and chemicals that affect normal or abnormal biochemical function

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

0
votes
0answers
5 views

Repeating assays assessing drug synergy by Chou and Talalay method

I have been using MTT cell viability assays to test compounds, both as single agents and in combination, in a constant ratio. From these assays I have been able to plot the median effect plot to get ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Biological difference in drugs vs drugs labeled as analytic standard?

I'm scaling up a project that uses ribavirin. Previously, I only had a need for small quantities, so I was prepared to pay a couple hundred dollars for ~50mg of pure chemical (Sigma - R9644). ...
3
votes
1answer
43 views

What does “generalisation” mean?

I am trying to understand a paper about ethanol: "Generalisation of ethanol with drug mixtures containing a positive modulator of the GABAA receptor and an NMDA antagonist" (Stolerman & Olufsen, ...
1
vote
1answer
94 views

What Effect would Cannabinoids have on the Acute Porphyrias?

I should be clear in saying that this question is NOT intended for personal medical advice. Rather what I am looking for is journal articles and/or books that touch on this subject because I think it ...
2
votes
1answer
28 views

Question about Enzyme Inhibition in relation to Aspirin

I've been trying to learn a bit more about pharmacology, so bear with my ignorance. In short, I see that aspirin (in part) works by inhibiting cycloxygenase isoenzymes and that this inhibiting is ...
0
votes
1answer
12 views

iPSC in drug discovery

Pluripotent stem cells are very popular and lots of research has been conducted to use these cells as a tool for drug discovery. My question is how many years would it theoretically safe is we could ...
4
votes
2answers
101 views

Does caffeine actually enhance cognition?

I have heard, respectively: Caffeine measurably enhances cognitive function. Caffeine does not measurably enhance cognitive function in any significant way. Caffeine enhances cognitive function, but ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Is 5-HTP a SSRI?

Can 5-Hydroxytryptophan (oxitriptan) be categorized as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)? Since they both act on the serotonin pathway and are used to treat depression and other mood ...
3
votes
1answer
16 views

Is receptor antagonism just long-term binding?

By my understanding, a substance that binds to a receptor and activates it is called an agonist, while a substance that binds to a receptor without activating it is called an antagonist. (Wiki) What ...
6
votes
1answer
117 views

How to determine sensitivity in a dose-response curve?

In a dose-response curve the % inhibition can be plotted against concentration antagonist. In our case, the effect of the antagonist is tested in different genetic variants of a microbe. When trying ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

Why is alcohol such a weak drug?

Most day to day drugs such as caffeine and paracetamol require a dosage in milligrams to have the desired effect. Why then, does it take many tens of grams of alcohol to have a tangible/noticeable ...
3
votes
3answers
301 views

Is there a known glucosepane cross-link breaker?

I read the following on wikipedia: There is, however, no agent known that can break down the most common AGE, glucosepane, which appears 10 to 1,000 times more common in human tissue than any ...
3
votes
0answers
40 views

How does glucose delivered intraperitoneal (i.p.) get into the peripheral circulation?

Intraperitoneal delivery of drugs or fluids is something that occurs much more frequently in veterinary medicine than clinical medicine. In veterinary medicine or scientific studies using animals, ...
4
votes
1answer
31 views

Do pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the drug in animals are the same as in human?

I'm trying to understand the purpose of different clinical trial phases, and the following question comes into my mind : Do pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the drug in animals are the ...
7
votes
2answers
643 views

Why are there so many medicinal plants?

Question Quite a few plant species can be used for medicinal purposes wiki. As an example, Filipendula ulmaria is rich in acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin). An allele that produces a substance which is ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

What is the effect of sodium chloride on head lice?

There are a lot of products that claim to kill lice and eggs. The main ingredient is sodium chloride. How does it work? I wonder if it has something to do with osmotic effects?
3
votes
1answer
65 views

What do proton pump inhibitors do?

I know that sodium azide and 2,4-DNPH inhibit proton pumps. The azide is called an inhibitor and 2,4-DNP is called uncoupler. I want to know what's the difference between the mechanisms of action of ...
17
votes
3answers
469 views

Why would diffusion be faster across a non-specialised tissue?

The standard protocol for a person experiencing chest pains is to chew a 300mg aspirin tablet, the argument being that chewing rather than swallowing the tablet results in the aspirin entering the ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

Which enzymes degrade dynorphins and what drugs inhibit these enzymes?

Which enzymes degrade dynorphins and what drugs are there available to inhibit said enzymes?
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Aspirin - does it inhibit enzyme of thromboxane?

This is a diagram a friend showed me about the drug aspirin, where we were arguing which enzyme it prevents. Aspirin is known to inhibit the production of prostaglandins. However, it also serves ...
2
votes
0answers
40 views

Does medication make the body dependent? [closed]

First of, I know of course that certain medication can cause an addiction if incorrectly used. But as far as I understand it, drugs prone to cause addiction have some agent in it, that makes them ...
4
votes
1answer
84 views

Relationship between toxicity of drugs and negative effects on brain

Are psychoactive drugs with lower lethal doses more neurotoxic (more damaging to the brain)? For example, tetrahydrocannabinol (one of the active components of cannabis) has a much higher lethal dose ...
13
votes
1answer
225 views

Do mammals develop tolerance to anticholinergics?

I know that first generation H1 antagonists, commonly known as antihistamines have anticholinergic effects. Their sedative side effects go away due to tolerance, but as for their anticholinergic side ...
3
votes
1answer
55 views

How are drug metabolism and detection related?

If someone is taking treatment for a psychiatric disorder (e.g. diazepine), then would traces of the metabolized drug be detectable in their sweat or saliva? Any links to resources regarding this, ...
4
votes
1answer
391 views

How is ammonia removed from the colon?

“Lactulose is also used to reduce the amount of ammonia in the blood of patients with liver disease. It works by drawing ammonia from the blood into the colon where it is removed from the body.” ...
16
votes
1answer
59k views

Why do vaccines cause your arm to hurt?

When you get a shot for a vaccine (for example, the annual flu vaccine), the nurse frequently indicates that your arm will ache for a day or two, maybe more. This ache is typically not just a pain ...
12
votes
1answer
304 views

How does paracetamol work?

Hinz et al. 2008 found that COX-2 may be inhibited by paracetamol, and this is attributed to it's analgesic and antipyretic properties. However there are other more recent claims from Andersson et ...
13
votes
1answer
5k views

Why does Penicillin only affect bacterial cell walls

I was quite fascinated by the feature Should Science Pull the Trigger on Antiviral Drugs—That Can Blast the Common Cold? in this month's Wired magazine. They explain that Penicillin is effective at ...
4
votes
1answer
77 views

Can the liver prioritize it's metabolizing potential?

Let's assume we have two toxins - one of which is routinely metabolized by the liver, and the other is new to the organism (consider for example alcohol in a heavy drinker and any other drug that is ...
2
votes
1answer
331 views

What are the characteristics of a promising drug?

Generally speaking, what makes a good drug for research?
2
votes
2answers
98 views

Blood draw from the elderly or those with tiny veins

A lot of people have very small veins making it next to impossible to draw blood. Would a nitroglycerin tablet (or some other vasodilator) before drawing blood help to enlarge veins?
3
votes
0answers
18 views

What are necessary parameters for a tissue scaffold to be biodegradable?`

I am a mechanical engineer with little biological experience, but I have recently been looking at tissue scaffoldings. My current understanding is as follows, but may be flawed. I would appreciate ...
2
votes
3answers
92 views

Homeopathy is placebo, but isn't placebo good?

I never considered homeopathy as a serious and scientific medicine, and now we have plenty of evidence supporting this ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

How do macromolecules (large drugs) in the eye reach the bloodstream and what are the relative significances of these pathways?

I am considering the elimination pathways for antibodies (50-150 kDa) from the vitreous humour to the blood stream. My overarching question is what is the most significant route such antibodies could ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Infection of urinary tract if the pH of urine is made alkaline

It is very well known that drugs like phenobarbiton,morphine are unionized, lipid soluble.So,in case if there is toxicity due to these drugs,the only way to save the patient is make the pH of urine ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Genotype-Phenotype databases?

Beyond the Stanford HIV database, what other databases out there provide a dataset linking virus/bacterial genotype to quantitative phenotype? I'm looking for high quality datasets to test machine ...
3
votes
2answers
128 views

How do antibiotics create drug-resistant strains

I've heard for years that low-level use of antibiotics causes the spread of drug-resistant strains of bacteria, but the explanations always fall short. I understand mutations and natural selection, ...
2
votes
1answer
126 views

Do drugs' levo isomers have a better interaction with the receptors in our body than dextro isomers?

Examples of levo drugs include levothyroxine, levocitrizine, and levodopa. Is there any specific reason why the receptors in our body exhibit this stereoisomerism and hold a high preference for the ...
4
votes
1answer
64 views

How does Tylenol relieve pain without making me drowsy?

So I have a crown that popped out and has been killing me, I've lived on a steady diet of Tylenol since it popped out. I've noticed that aside from killing most of the pain from the tooth, the tylenol ...
3
votes
1answer
97 views

Difficulty in finding protein inhibition drugs

I was reading an article on a recent identification of a PARP-14 protein in cancer cells that is responsible for production of additional glucose which keeps cancer cells from dying, and that a ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

Why are pharmacology studies so experimental?

I am a med student, and as far as I see from our pharmacology lectures, pharmacologists work almost completely experimental. Quite typically they take a substance (e.g., from nature), they add, change ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Western blot extrange band

I performed a WB using plasma rats and monkeys samples with anti ubiquitin K-48 antibody. In every sample the antibody binds something and it appears a specific band that seems to be 71kDa. When I ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Birth control hormones in the water? Or not?

This prior question talks about natural estrogen (TL;DR: Months to years): How quickly do estrogens break down in the environment? Ref: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/485441a A lot of media has said, ...
9
votes
3answers
555 views

Do spinal cord reflexes (such as the knee-jerk reflex) continue to function under general anaesthesia?

The knee-jerk reflex (patellar reflex) is an example of a stretch reflex (myotatic reflex). Stretch reflexes are monosynaptic reflexes happening in the spinal cord without involvement of the brain. ...
3
votes
2answers
55 views

Chemotherapy - Hair loss

Chemotherapy kills cancer cells by targeting rapidly growing cells. That is why patients are loosing hair as well. My question is, why chemo related hair loss is temporary ? The docs say it is ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Source of journals collecting titles of scientific publications regarding clinical trials with dogs fed medicinal herbs

After some time researching on the web, you can find a lot of websites telling you that some herbs may have or have specific properties(unfortunately most seem to be "advertised" as if they were ...
4
votes
0answers
41 views

How does drug-induced photosensitivity work?

Some drugs (tetracyclines, for instance) can cause photosensitivity reactions—that is, some patients become extremely sensitive to the sun, developing rashes or inflammation after spending time ...
3
votes
3answers
239 views

Why is dopamine or a dopamine-receptor agonist not pumped into the brain of Parkinson patients?

I am aware that dopamine cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, but can't it be pumped inside the cerebrospinal fluid via some permanent tube implant? Wouldn't Parkinson patients chose that over ...
0
votes
1answer
120 views

How much penicillinase is needed to deactivate 125mg of amoxicillin?

How much penicillinase is needed to deactivate 125mg of amoxicillin? Penicillinase in penase concentrate from CPC. 20,000 Levy Units/ml/min I need IU of 125 mg of amoxicillin. Please note that the ...
12
votes
1answer
301 views

How do you design a drug to be delivered to the CNS?

I have just started reading up on structure-based methods for drug design (this is completely not my field so apologies for stupid questions that will be coming along!) Clearly, some drugs are ...