0
votes
1answer
14 views

What is the difference between the basal membrane and the basal lamina?

I'm researching about the basal lamina in lung tissue and I'm not sure if the basal membrane is the same. What is the difference between them?
1
vote
1answer
28 views

What are the risk factors of elevating legs for too regularly and when tired?

I started to to think the pathophysiology of elevating legs high next to the wall too often and when you are tired. I think possible manifestations some damage to valves of the veins (No!) because ...
2
votes
0answers
40 views

Relationship between mN and mg in vessel contraction studies?

What is the relationship between mN and mg as the units involved to measure the changes in contraction? A tool most widely used is an instrument called myograph. In these exoeriments, either units of ...
7
votes
3answers
131 views

Where does extra blood come from to fill your muscles during exercise?

Let's say I go to the gym and lift some weights an hour. During this time my arms will grow due to the "pump" -- the extra blood rushing in to feed the muscles. For example, I've measured about 2-3 ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

How does vasomotor and bronchomotor reactions equilibrate local blood flow to correspond local ventilation?

I am trying to find some figure(s) to explain this. There is probably better name for "bronchomotor" reaction. They seem to opposite terms and actually affecting same things (alveolar diameter/tone); ...
-3
votes
1answer
37 views

Which chemical and hormonal effects on heart are by metabolites?

I am thinking which hormonal and chemical effects from: catecholamines thyroxin corticosteroids sex hormones prostaglandins Ca2+ Na+ K+ can be be regarded as metabolites i.e. intermediates or ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

To characterise diameter of capillaries in organs

I know that there exist Continuous capillaries (skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, connective tissue, pulmonary circulation), Fenestrated capillaries (small intestine, renal glomerulus, exocrine ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

What is the quality rate of intrinsic autoregulation in the heart?

Autoregulation is the maintenance of constant blood flow to an organ in spite of fluctuations in Blood pressure. It involves the relaxation of myocardium and contraction. It is local. I know that ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

What are the movement mechanisms of thrombus?

I am thinking how thrombus (veins, arteries and heart) can move. Secondary mechanisms come to my mind only: some enzyme which lyses it, probably adhesion mechanism. Blood circulation (flow rate) ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

To define the total Resistance of Systemic Blood Circulation

Some systems are in parallel so let's just call those like $R_{\text{lungs}}$. I got this formula $$R_{\text{total}}=R_A+R_a+R_c+R_V+R_v$$ where $R_c$ capillaries, $R_a$ arterioles, $R_A$ Small ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

What are the main parameters for systemic circulation?

I have in my notes that main parameters for systemic circulation are ejected blood per minute central venous pressure (in the right atrium) work done by the heart something else What can this ...
2
votes
1answer
64 views

What happens during a Raynauds episode?

Raynaud's phenomenon can be a serious health issue, as the blood flow to the extremities, mainly the fingers is compromised, causing fingers to blanche, and then turn blue. Severe Raynaud's can cause ...