The study of the normal function of living organisms and the means by which it is achieved.

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6
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1answer
73 views

What is the top speed of muscle contraction?

Currently I am looking into what muscles groups are most used during a football kick. I have a hypothesis that the quadriceps are not as used as most people think because the momentum the swing ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Possible calculations with temperature, humidity, images and VIS spectrum of a plant in an Integrating sphere

I am currently working on a project which involves growing some plants in a integrating sphere made of foam. I have added temperature, humidity and soil moisture sensors as well as a Spectrometer (350 ...
3
votes
2answers
484 views

Bernoulliโ€™s Principle in the Cardiovascular System

Below are graphs which illustrate the cross-sectional area, velocity, and fluid pressure through each vascular segment of the cardiovascular system. It makes sense that velocity and cross-sectional ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

Would a human survive eating only living ants?

After reading an admittedly foolish question about 1 googol ants vs. 1000 humans, I had a question. Could a human survive solely on eating ants (common ants, not the stinging kind, or leafcutters ...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

How do t-lymphocytes become mature if thymus has lost its function?

The development of t-lymphocytes are done by thymus and we also know that the thymus degenerates before puberty and we also know the maximum lifespan of WBC's is 15 days. So, how do t-lymphocytes ...
2
votes
0answers
17 views

Peculiarity of chemo senses [closed]

We can easily recall our visual stimulus and auditory stimulus but why can't we recall chemical stimulus like smell and pain? We can recall a song or picture but we can't exactly recall smell and ...
5
votes
1answer
268 views

Where do most mutations come from, mitosis or meiosis?

According to this (old) paper there are 10 times more mutations during meiosis than during mitosis. One reason for that is that recombination often causes replication error and therefore mutations. ...
2
votes
1answer
91 views

How does Celiac's Disease cause people to stop growing?

In all of the sites I've looked on, one of the symptoms of Celiac's Disease is the failure to grow in children. Why would an immune attack against gluten cause stunted growth? Celiac.org states: ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

Physiology of tricuspid and bicuspid(mitral) valves

The tricuspid and bicuspid valves are atrioventricular valves. Both are valves that prevent backflow of blood pumped from the atria to the ventricles. However, the former has 3 "flaps" while the ...
2
votes
0answers
118 views

Skin extra sensitive to heat after burn

I just got my finger burnt (first degree burn $\Rightarrow$ I didn't even bother to bear the wound). It didn't hurt much, even when I pressed the wound. However, when exposed to heat (hot water, but ...
17
votes
3answers
2k views

Why does the face turn pale in dangerous situations?

I know what the effects are of a dangerous situation on the brain, i.e., an activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis which eventually results in an increased heart rate and elevated ...
4
votes
2answers
133 views

What is the relationship between W, X, Y and P, M retinal ganglion cells?

In Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology (12e) the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are classified into W, X, and Y types. However, in Gray's Anatomy (40th ed.), RGS are subdivided into midget ...
3
votes
1answer
38 views

How do cold conditions help organ transplants?

Body organs are kept cold in-between explanting them from the donor and implanting them in the new host. How do these cold conditions help organs to stay viable while they haven't fresh blood, energy ...
1
vote
1answer
204 views

How much heat can a human sustain? [closed]

For how long can a human sustain a temperature of 180 degrees Fahrenheit (82oC) without damage in a confined place? For instance, suppose a person is sitting in a steam-filled room, without external ...
4
votes
2answers
149 views

Can carnivores survive on a (processed) vegetarian diet? Why or why not?

There are many differences in for example the digestive system between carnivores, herbivores and omnivores. It seems that in certain kinds of species adaptability with respect to diet is possible. ...
6
votes
2answers
50 views

Why do epithelial cells arrest in response to serum?

Primary epithelial cells, for example human mammary epithelium, fail to proliferate (arrest) in serum-containing medium. Therefore, a common growth medium for epithelium contains pituitary extract ...
4
votes
1answer
87 views

How are smell and taste in fish differentiated?

The senses of taste and smell in different fish classes are described as two distinct senses; smell is mediated by the nasal openings, and taste by epithelial taste buds. They are both forms of ...
23
votes
2answers
3k views

Why does an electrical shock freeze up muscles?

Why is it when someone comes into contact with an electrical supply that their body freezes up and is unable to move away from the electrical source? Can someone explain this through a physiological ...
3
votes
1answer
37 views

classical conditioning paradigm for hippocampal learning

I wanted to know what a suitable classical conditioning experiment would be to analyze learning and memory capabilities in rodent models with respect to hippocampal long-term potentiation. For ...
9
votes
1answer
182 views

What is the convention for log notation in biology?

I'm reading through some oldish (1980s) papers on length-weight relationships in fish and crustaceans. Many report log-log relationships without specifying whether this is natural log, base 10, etc. ...
9
votes
1answer
730 views

Why is the brain dependent on glucose?

The strict dependence of the (human) brain on glucose has always been puzzling to me. While ketones can substitute for a portion of the brain's energy needs, it cannot substitute completely: blood ...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

Are there fishes with a double circulatory system?

Our courseware materials say there are such fishes, but my Internet searches suggests fishes only have a single circulatory system.
4
votes
0answers
128 views

What are those visual and auditory reflex controlled by the midbrain? [closed]

The midbrain is a centre for certain visual and auditory reflexes. But what are those reflexes exactly? My study book says that these reflexes are, e.g., responsible for moving the eyes to view ...
3
votes
2answers
63 views

Determining how much energy a plant takes in?

I asked a question on WorldBuilding.SE, "Are diamond berries possible?". This led to asking a question on Chemistry.SE about the amount of energy required to burn a 1 ct. diamond (โˆ’6.527kJ). The ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

Where does the exudate comes from during inflammation?

During inflammation transudate and exudate is formed by vessels. I would like to make sure if it comes from arterioles, venules, or both, and the reason why.
1
vote
0answers
137 views

Why can we control our breath rate but not our heart rate? [closed]

Even though we cannot survive for more than few minutes if we stop breathing or if our heart stops, why is it so that our heart beat is controlled involuntarily while breathing can be voluntarily ...
1
vote
0answers
93 views

How many mitotic divisions do haploid cells undergo before fertilization?

Background This question is about human physiology and gametogenesis. A spermatozoid is not necessarily the direct "offspring" of diploid cell. Stated differently, a spermatozoid cell can be the ...
-4
votes
1answer
692 views

Why do fingers swell during cold winters?

When exercising, tissue in the hands may swell. This may be caused by the muscles generating heat, which leads to blood being pushed to the vessels closest to the surface of your body to dissipate the ...
11
votes
4answers
7k views

How can we differentiate between respiration and breathing?

I am a student of 10th grade, and I eagerly want to learn biology. What is the difference between respiration and breathing?
3
votes
3answers
749 views

Why Doesnโ€™t Hypercalcemia Cause Muscle Spasms?

If you have more calcium in the cell, wouldnโ€™t more attach to troponin and initiate muscle contraction? Why does hypercalcemia cause muscle weakness instead of spasms?
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Does creatine-phosphate (CP) supplementation regenerate NADH?

I have the following facts: It is possible to convert ATP <-> creatine vice-versa. (ref - non scientific) CP supplementation protects against metabolic syndrome. ref1 ref2 Fructose digestion ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

Does breathing air containing 3% carbon dioxide gives you a headache?

As far as I know, breathing air containing relatively high levels of CO2 may get you a headache. I also know that CO2 level in the fruit bodies of peppers can reach levels as high as 3% at certain ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Difference between facilitated diffusion and secondary active transport in cells

Specifically, what is the difference between facilitated diffusion carrier processes (passive transport) and secondary active transport co-transport processes (active transport)? They seem to be the ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

How is ATP involved in muscle contraction?

The sliding filament mechanism as explained by my text does not elaborate on how ATP is involved in the cross bridge binding and contraction process. How does muscle contraction utilize ATP? In my ...
0
votes
1answer
117 views

Why should or shouldn't we allow the human body to take its natural course? [closed]

For example, when you are sick but don't feel thirsty, this could be due to baroreceptor reflex that is attempting to readjust salt and water balancing. Why shouldn't a patient be left thirsty and ...
4
votes
1answer
125 views

Question about epinephrine

In my class we were told that adrenaline (or epinephrine) causes vasoconstriction. My question was I had always thought that people took this via an EpiPen when they were having an allergic reaction. ...
3
votes
1answer
148 views

Why do people in the scientific community use terminology such as renal, hepatic, cardiac instead of kidney, liver and heart? [closed]

Are there differences between renal, hepatic, cardiac and kidney, liver and heart? Is the "jargon" used more commonly because of tradition, or is there some definitive biological basis to it?
0
votes
0answers
173 views

What is the difference between specific and nonspecific stress response?

My book states that given any stressor, the body will response by providing a specific response to that stressor and a non-specific response that is triggered no matter what the stressor is (fear, ...
3
votes
2answers
391 views

When glucose production is low, the brain begins using ketoacids as energy… how does that work?

Can someone very generally describe how the brain consumes ketoacids/ketone bodies when blood glucose has been completely depleted?
1
vote
1answer
39 views

What is the so called “hepatic glucose production”

I came across this term in my readings but I do not understand how this works. Can someone direct me to some reference as to what this "hepatic" glucose production is all about?
1
vote
1answer
102 views

Given an EC50 value, how do I reproduce the sigmoidal curve from which this was calculated?

All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is a potent ligand for a nuclear receptor called retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARa). The concentration of atRA at which RARa is half maximal is 19nM. The dose-response ...
3
votes
1answer
69 views

Liver - Regeneration in Cirrhosis

Liver is the most resilient of the human organ (on par with or next to skin). A very interesting experiment on liver regeneration is here. Even if two-thirds of the liver is removed, the remaining ...
5
votes
1answer
112 views

Case study and speculations on the brain of Edward Mordake

I am very interested in the case of the man named Edward Mordake who lived in the 19th century. In particular, he had two faces. If you have not heard of this man, please, search this up as there are ...
3
votes
0answers
30 views

Blood as newtonian flow and Poiseuille law [closed]

For a prep exam: A healtly pacient has a carotid with the following characteristics: intern ratio: ๐‘…= 2.8 mm, ๐‘ƒ2 = 89 ๐‘š๐‘š๐ป๐‘”, ๐‘ƒ1 = 90 ๐‘š๐‘š๐ป๐‘”, ๐œ‡blood = 3.5 cp, ๐ฟ=10.0 cm. Using the ...
2
votes
1answer
180 views

How to define drug-resistant or -sensitive cell line when knowing the IC50 values?

I have got the IC50 data for a drug on different cell lines. How to define if the cell line is sensitive or resistant towards this drug? Could anyone tell me how to define this?
3
votes
1answer
68 views

How is circadian rhythm of gastric acid secretion regulated?

Gastric acid secretion shows a circadian rhythm where acid production in the morning is minimal and it reaches a maximum towards the evening. How is this process regulated?
3
votes
3answers
313 views

What is the difference between meristem and bud?

Keep reading both terms quite frequently while studying plant physiology. I did some research trying to establish their differences and I learnt that meristems are undifferentiated cells that can ...
1
vote
2answers
385 views

Why can newborns swim?

I am wondering for someone to discuss the phenomena that newborn babies (humans) are able to submerge underwater up until a few months where that ability is lost again? What is the explanation for ...
3
votes
1answer
96 views

What is the impact of stress on the human body?

Can stress trigger any changes in the human body? I'd like to know more about things less commonly known than, for example: sweating and tiredness. What are the long term risks of chronic stress? Do ...
9
votes
2answers
321 views

Should we induce fever to assist healing?

I am currently reading "The Fundamentals of Anatomy Physiology" 10th edition, and have found it an incredibly interesting book. I have just been reading about the lymphatic system, and the various ...