The study of the normal function of living organisms and the means by which it is achieved.

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857 views

How are our senses dimmed during sleep?

Our senses are not as sensitive during sleep compared to wake. There is an arousal threshold during sleep that only when it is overcome will it wake a person up. My question is how is this arousal ...
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1answer
90 views

What are the risks of elevating the legs too regularly and when tired?

I started to to think the pathophysiology of elevating legs high next to the wall too often and when you are tired. I think possible manifestations some damage to valves of the veins (No!) because ...
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0answers
25 views

Physiology of benign eye twitching?

About four times in my life I have experienced the feeling of my eyelid fluttering for a few minutes by itself, and then it stops. I have talked to other people who have had the same experience so I ...
6
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2answers
12k views

What could cause hairs to gray at the tips but not the roots?

I have noticed that some of my sporadic gray hairs are gray at the tip side but oddly, not near the roots. Some are even only gray in the middle. I find all of this very counter intuitive, and I ...
0
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1answer
34 views

What is the difference between the basal membrane and the basal lamina?

I'm researching about the basal lamina in lung tissue and I'm not sure if the basal membrane is the same. What is the difference between them?
3
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0answers
56 views

Which organs in the body are responsible for measuring temperature?

As an instrumentation engineer, I have designed temperature control systems capable of measuring and controlling temperature with a precision of 0.001K over a wide temperature range. I have always ...
3
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1answer
135 views

NADH inhibits gluconeogenesis?

I was told in a physiology lecture that alcohol inhibits gluconeogenesis because 'NADH produced from ethanol catabolism leads to product inhibition'. But is NADH not a reactant coenzyme of ...
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0answers
35 views

Why are there no animals with a length greater than 30-40 meters or with a mass greater than 200 tonnes? [duplicate]

The biggest and heaviest aquatic animal is the blue whale: 30 meters long and a mass of 200 tonnes. The biggest and heaviest terrestrial animal was a Sauropod (plant-eating, long-necked dinosaur): 40 ...
11
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1answer
478 views

How long can a bee surive in a jar?

So, some people and I encountered an adventure game where you have a bee in a jar and need to move it from place to place before it suffocates, and someone tried to find out how long a bee would ...
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1answer
111 views

cellular respiration

What are the effects of addition of these chemicals to actively respiring cells ? Which of them would lead to INHIBITION of aerobic respiration ? Would cytochromes be actually taken up by cells ? ...
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3answers
256 views

What difference does it make in the organism's physiology/metabolism whether oxygen binds reversibly or not?

A follow-up to How does hemoglobin-free blood transport oxygen? I'm unsure about the use of physiology/metabolism in the title there. The question in mind is whether this reversible binding makes an ...
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2answers
2k views

How do insects breathe?

Do ants even breathe? If they don't, how do they stay alive? On what resources do they depend upon to stay alive? How are they different form mammals?
0
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1answer
179 views

Why can CO₂ be transported dissolved in plasma?

Is it because CO2 is more soluble in water or has it got to do with the alkaline pH of plasma ?I here mean only aqueous CO2 transport from body cells to lungs.
6
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3answers
136 views

What gaseous substances do humans emit?

Other than CO₂ and Methane what other gases do humans produce or emit? For example, does skin decomposition, or aerobic respiration emit any special gases that people don't normally realize or know ...
6
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2answers
105 views

Why do small organisms make faster movements than big organisms?

I hesitated to ask this question because it seems so obvious and intuitive. However, I am not able to explain this tendency. Background It seems to me that small organisms make faster movements than ...
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1answer
47 views

All or nothing phenomena

We know that an action potential is produced by an active cell membrane when the stimulus reaches a certain threshold. When it does, an action potential fires, and when it doesn't, nothing happens. ...
2
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1answer
85 views

How do animals handle light refraction in different media?

For a human, when diving underwater, everything is blurry because of the water's different refractive index compared to that of air, which we are accustomed to. How do animals, like turtles, seals or ...
11
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2answers
1k views

How do we know the presence of light when our eyes are closed?

Last night I laid on my bed and tried to go to sleep with the light off. I closed my eyes (but hadn't gone to sleep). My younger brother touched the wireless mouse (which had laser) for the laptop. ...
13
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1answer
88 views

What is the mechanism responsible for the periodicity of hiccups?

Hiccups (singultus) are caused by involuntary spasm of the intercostal muscles and diaphragm, producing a sudden inspiration with associated glottic closure. It seems the neurobiology of the reflex ...
0
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1answer
48 views

Normal position of Electrical axis only in the III lead?

I found this sentence in my notes which is not exact enough: Electrical axes Excitatory processes have definite direction and magnitude and could therefore be represented as vectors. At ...
0
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2answers
70 views

Can you disconnect sensation from the brain without destroying muscle functions?

I want to know if it would be possible for a surgeon to "shut off" a person's senses without causing paralysis of any kind. The person would have to maintain their ability to speak and move, but not ...
3
votes
1answer
55 views

Mechanisms of bone growth

The length of a bone is caused by growth of hyaline cartilage which is then replaced by bone tissue. How do cells know whether they should grow the hyaline cartilage? What are the key molecules that ...
2
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0answers
43 views

Biology Experiment Data (Hodgkin-Huxley)

I'm doing research into the Hodgkin-Huxley Model from an electronics/mathematics perspective and I'm looking to find actual numerical results from experiments on squid axons. I want to compare the ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Normal Frequencies in Heart

I am trying to visualise possible ranges of frequencies from different structures of heart: different valves and their possible frequencies heart sounds I - IV and their normal frequencties what can ...
3
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1answer
267 views

What are the highest and lowest possible pH, paCO2 and HCO3 in the blood of living human?

What are the highest and lowest possible values of pH, $paCO_2$, and $HCO_3$ in the (arterial or venous) blood of a living human being?
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2answers
1k views

Do women have testosterone?

In a documentary on fitness I saw it was stated that women can't get big like men because of their low concentration of testosterone. If it is true that women have testosterone, where is it made? Why ...
2
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1answer
40 views

Kinesiology Tape Benefits

Recently, kinesiology tape has become popular, especially in CrossFit. I have also noted its' use in the NFL, and I want to say Tennis as well. What beneficial effects does this tape offer our bodies ...
8
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1answer
7k views

What is the normal duration of human sexual intercourse?

Wikipedia is saying: Men's typical ejaculatory latency is approximately 4–8 minutes How the researchers measured this? How did they know if the test subjects weren't suffering from premature ...
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1answer
28 views

What triggers the release of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone with the onset of puberty?

I am interested to know the process of development of puberty. During puberty, when boys/girls reache 12-14 (puberty) years of their age, their hypothalamus releases gonadotropin releasing hormone ...
4
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1answer
109 views

Counterintuitive action of Vitamin D?

Vitamin D acts in a way which to me is counterintuitive. It functionally supplemets Parathormone. It in the intestinal tract steps up calcium absorption by altering nuclear gene expression and also ...
4
votes
2answers
217 views

Where do the 31 spinal nerves start/meet?

Which part of the brain is the first place (from top to bottom) where all 31 pairs of spinal nerves (on each side) meet? Or if they all start at one place - where is that? Nominally, the beginning of ...
4
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1answer
106 views

How efficient is the human body at metabolizing food?

My friend and I were having a discussion over how "efficient" human digestion is. If a human ate a 1000 calorie hamburger, how many of those calories (how much energy) does the body process into ...
21
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3answers
4k views

What actually happens when my leg 'falls asleep'?

Most people have experienced the temporary loss of feeling and tingling in their leg resulting from sitting in an abnormal position for a short while. Usually you get a loss of feeling in your leg ...
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1answer
82 views

brain activity responsible for imagination

Which part of brain is responsible for advance or unseen imagination For example:ones brain can make a situation in mind which is impossible to happen ...which part of brain is hyper active?
3
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1answer
281 views

Why do I breathe out of BOTH nostrils?

After reading the question why do I only breathe out of one nostril I realized that breathing out of both isn't common. I have always breathed out of both, and when I get a stuffy nose, or a runny ...
5
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1answer
40 views

Components of the concept of Developmental Noise?

Developmental noise is a concept that correspond to the amount of possible phenotypic variance of a given genotype in a given environment. Intrinsic noise (aka Cellular noise) is a component of ...
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3answers
1k views

Why are there no organisms with metal body parts, like weapons, bones, and armour? (Or are there?)

Reading this question, Why are there no wheeled animals?, I wondered why no organisms seem to make use of the tensile and other strengths of metal, as we do in metal tools and constructions. I am ...
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2answers
253 views

Why does a blood test show ethanol when no alcohol was consumed?

Why would ethanol show up in a blood test if a person had not been drinking alcohol in many years. What are other reasons for showing ethanol?
0
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1answer
31 views

Characteristics of radius of blood vessel

Which properties do determine the radius of blood vessel? I have these thoughts distension, elasticity, contractility and cross-sectional area of the walls. Is there any other properties?
3
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1answer
513 views

How is Hypertonic Urine Produced in a Mammalian Kidney?

I know that the ascending loop of Henle is impermeable to water and ions, and, by end of the ascending limb, the osmolarity of the tubular fluid is very low due to the active transport of ions out ...
2
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1answer
37 views

What's the mechanism behind 'losing heat through your extremities'?

I can understand how if you are not circulating enough (warm) blood, by not moving much while in a cold environment, your extremities themselves lose heat, and become cold - but I don't understand how ...
4
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1answer
97 views

Are there any situations in which phenylephrine is preferred to pseudoephedrine?

In the mid 2000s in the US, due to issues of drug enforcement, pseudoephedrine containing medications were brought behind the pharmacy counter and in most cases require ID, and phenylephrine was ...
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2answers
444 views

Negative role of Placenta

How can a placenta turn hostile to the mother or fetus ? What are the abnormalities found during placental delivery ?
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0answers
13 views

What biological processes are affected by dietary fiber besides peristalsis?

Dietary fiber affects the rate of peristalsis, but what other effects does it have? Does fiber affect signal transduction, hydration, the autonomic nervous system, organ function, other biological ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

How does extracellular potassium ion concentration and calcium ion concentration affect the excitability of a cell?

When extracellular $K^+$ concentration increase by a certain amount, excitability of cells is higher because the resting potential shifts toward a higher equilibrium potential of $K^+$, therefore ...
3
votes
2answers
134 views

What are the factors that control the speed of propagation of neuronal signals?

If we consider an analogy between a wire and a neuron there may be some resemblance between the factors controlling the data flow rate. For example the increased width of wire leads to decreased ...
2
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1answer
272 views

Why does caffeine consumption cause one to urinate more?

What is the physiological mechanism behind the diuretic effect of caffeine?
2
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1answer
85 views

Why does the arch of aorta coils?

My study materials use the word vesselcompression chamber of aorta to emphasize aorta's elastic property. The arch of the aorta only coils, not its straight part. I think the reason why the arch ...
0
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1answer
41 views

Why is Aorta sometimes called Compression chamber?

I find this statement that Aorta is called Compression Chamber in my study materials. Aorta can it keeps blood flowing it can accumulate potential energy for bumping and compression However, why ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Why there is a very high drop in pressure from arteries to arterioles?

Laplace law explains why the pressure is the same in aorta and arteries (100). I am thinking why there is so big drop in pressure when going from arteries to arterioles (40-60). Why there is a great ...