The study of the normal function of living organisms and the means by which it is achieved.

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552 views

Do tall people have more cells?

Within a single species, how does the relative number of cells in the body relate to the relative size of the organism? Let's say we take two humans, one of them is 6 feet tall and the other one is 5 ...
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1answer
50 views

Normal Frequencies in Heart

I am trying to visualise possible ranges of frequencies from different structures of heart: different valves and their possible frequencies heart sounds I - IV and their normal frequencties what can ...
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0answers
36 views

How do the symptoms of Sepsis affect heart function?

I have intuition that Sepsis with infection can cause spastic functioning of heart during systole heart working spontaneously in snatches during systole atrial fibrillation first contraction of ...
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1answer
49 views

Nervous system: Pain and Pleasure?

If you have a constant pain in your body, why does a greater pain or pleasure make you not feel the original pain?
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1answer
66 views

Missing 4$H_2O$s (per glucose) in Cellular Respiration… Where can they be?

I having trouble understanding the equation of the cellular respiration. The thing that bothers me is the number of $H_2O$ molecules. Generally, cellular respiration is written thus : $C_6H_{12}O_6 + ...
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1answer
48 views

Fibrinous inflammation, exudate and scarring in monotonous movements and ageing

I have palpated many hard organs during my work and studies. I have seen many young and old people who have hard organs, like very hard shoulder - very common. I have interviewed some of them, some ...
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0answers
73 views

A day in Beijing is like smoking Only one sixth of a cigarette

This is the title of this blog post followed by this other good post. I'm particularly anti-tobacco-smoke, at the point of not always considering other pollution, and this article shows how this kind ...
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1answer
259 views

Are females more flexible than males in all mammals?

It's common that human females have a more flexible body than males, (but I don't know why, so it'd be helpful if someone answers why so as well!) but does this apply to all mammals?
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23 views

How does vasomotor and bronchomotor reactions equilibrate local blood flow to correspond local ventilation?

I am trying to find some figure(s) to explain this. There is probably better name for "bronchomotor" reaction. They seem to opposite terms and actually affecting same things (alveolar diameter/tone); ...
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1answer
77 views

What is the function of clot retraction?

I am thinking how clot retraction and fibrinolysis work together. I think that clot retraction is a process that gets clot towards fibrinolysis process. Fibrinolysis process then lyses the clot. ...
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1answer
19 views

To characterise diameter of capillaries in organs

I know that there exist Continuous capillaries (skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, connective tissue, pulmonary circulation), Fenestrated capillaries (small intestine, renal glomerulus, exocrine ...
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1answer
38 views

What is the quality rate of intrinsic autoregulation in the heart?

Autoregulation is the maintenance of constant blood flow to an organ in spite of fluctuations in Blood pressure. It involves the relaxation of myocardium and contraction. It is local. I know that ...
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1answer
30 views

Are there any forms of heart failure where cell size decreases?

I think hypertrophy happens in most of the cases. However, I am not sure if hypertrophy always happens. I started to think about wet lungs (pulmonary reason for the left-sided heart failure). Can the ...
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1answer
46 views

What is ischaemia exactly?

I think it is decreased blood supply to organs and tissues. I also think it is the stopped circulation. However, both ones cannot be right, I think. What is ischaemia exactly?
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1answer
77 views

What is the difference between intracardiac and extracardiac reflexes in cardiac regulation?

The primary parameters of heart pumping are strength of contractility (inotropic positive; Frank-Starling relationship) rate of relaxation (lusitropic positive) heart rate (chronotropic positive) ...
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1answer
51 views

Do's and Don't's of Undergraduate Research? [closed]

I was fortunate enough to get a position as a researcher for the Mayo Clinic's SURF Program this year. My PI's lab focus is on the the immune system's role in CNS axonal and neuronal injury, ...
3
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2answers
151 views

Electronic cigarettes (e-cigs), any health risks?

Background: An electronic cigarette (e-cig or e-cigarette) is a battery-powered device which simulates tobacco smoking patented in 1963 by Herbert A. Gilbert. It generally uses a heating element ...
3
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2answers
91 views

What are the physiological roles of Hydrogen sulfide?

I am thinking why hydrogen sulfide has its effects in the body. For instance, it is one Salmonella's virulence factor. I am not sure if such a balance equations holds H2O + H2S ←→ ... Actually, I ...
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0answers
37 views

Nearly Exhaustive List for Cholesterol Pathways

I have run across an interesting case that is similar to only two others I've encountered. What makes it interesting is the combination of undetectable (under normal testing conditions, can elaborate ...
3
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1answer
267 views

What are the highest and lowest possible pH, paCO2 and HCO3 in the blood of living human?

What are the highest and lowest possible values of pH, $paCO_2$, and $HCO_3$ in the (arterial or venous) blood of a living human being?