The study of the normal function of living organisms and the means by which it is achieved.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

3
votes
1answer
86 views

Do human visual functions degenerate due to genetic factors or by external factors?

Does eyesight primarily deteriorate 'naturally' due to genetics (genomic/epigenomic factors), or due to external factors such as normal wear and tear, or disease? By normal wear and tear I include ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

NADH inhibits gluconeogenesis?

I was told in a physiology lecture that alcohol inhibits gluconeogenesis because 'NADH produced from ethanol catabolism leads to product inhibition'. But is NADH not a reactant coenzyme of ...
3
votes
1answer
116 views

How does regurgitated food go to the 3rd stomach chamber instead of going to the 1st?

Ruminants are known for their regurgitation of food; the food goes through the 1st and 2nd stomach chambers, then returns to the oral cavity in cuds. The cuds then come back into the stomach, but this ...
3
votes
1answer
149 views

How does sepsis affect heart function?

I have intuition that sepsis with infection can cause: spastic functioning of heart during systole heart working spontaneously in snatches during systole atrial fibrillation first contraction of ...
3
votes
1answer
692 views

Why does caffeine consumption cause one to urinate more?

What is the physiological mechanism behind the diuretic effect of caffeine?
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Alternating Ovulation

I have often heard that right and left ovaries alternate in releasing ovum. Is it always true? What controls this rhythm? Is it simply because the other ovary is unresponsive to LH or FSH? If so, ...
3
votes
1answer
76 views

Difference in reptile inner ear and otosclerosis

In reptiles, the sound is conducted from the tympanic membrane to the inner ear by a single bone. In the disease otosclerosis the stapes of humans become fused to the other middle ear bones( or to ...
3
votes
2answers
89 views

Why we have to damage our muscles to build them?

I know that new muscle cells are made when actin fibers are disrupted. My hypothesis is that muscle mass is limited, from birth, and that nutrients (protein) are only directed to grow muscle when ...
3
votes
1answer
337 views

Is the swimming pool water harmful to frogs who jump in? If so, how?

Here is an odd question: Frogs have permeable skin. Indeed, via capillary action, frogs absorb water through their skin. Chlorine is in principle a harmful substance. I am sure what percentage of ...
3
votes
2answers
63 views

Determining how much energy a plant takes in?

I asked a question on WorldBuilding.SE, "Are diamond berries possible?". This led to asking a question on Chemistry.SE about the amount of energy required to burn a 1 ct. diamond (−6.527kJ). The ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Difference between facilitated diffusion and secondary active transport in cells

Specifically, what is the difference between facilitated diffusion carrier processes (passive transport) and secondary active transport co-transport processes (active transport)? They seem to be the ...
3
votes
1answer
69 views

Liver - Regeneration in Cirrhosis

Liver is the most resilient of the human organ (on par with or next to skin). A very interesting experiment on liver regeneration is here. Even if two-thirds of the liver is removed, the remaining ...
3
votes
1answer
485 views

Antihistamine's effect on insulin secretion and tiredness

Antihistamines are known to cause tiredness. The essential hormones of the body are insulin (glucose), parathyroid hormone (calcium) and aldosterone (Na-K ATPase, sodium). I am thinking how this ...
3
votes
1answer
25 views

Polarized epithelium and localization of ion channels

I'm trying to learn more about polarized epithelial cells of the gut. I am familiar with classic brush border transporters localized to the apical memebrane to facilitate nutrient absorption. I am ...
3
votes
2answers
162 views

What are the physiological roles of Hydrogen sulfide?

I am thinking why hydrogen sulfide has its effects in the body. For instance, it is one Salmonella's virulence factor. I am not sure if such a balance equations holds H2O + H2S ←→ ... Actually, I ...
3
votes
1answer
453 views

Is there a maximum pain threshold?

Is there a maximum threshold of pain a Human can experience, beyond which point there is no noticeable difference? I ask this question in part to better understand the definition of pain and its ...
3
votes
1answer
133 views

Why does hypertension occur in obstructive sleep apnea?

What is the physiological mechanism behind systemic hypertension resulting from obstructive sleep apnea?
3
votes
2answers
463 views

How does Humira work when injected into patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

OK, I have rheumatoid arthritis and I've been injecting Humira 2 times a month for the last 8 months. As far as I know rheumatoid arthritis is simply an immune system disorder which makes the immune ...
3
votes
1answer
51 views

Effect of arteriole dilation on vein

If an arteriole leading to a capillary bed is dilated will the pressure in the vein coming out from the bed decrease ? Will the velocity of blood in the vein change ?
3
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the genetic basis of blood type (ABO) system?

What is the genetic basis of the A/B/B+/O/etc. blood type system? Are there definitive loci that correspond to each or can multiple different genotypes produce the same antigen profile? Also, is the ...
3
votes
1answer
113 views

Are ectopic beats considered sinus rhythm for pNN50 purposes?

One quantification of the heart rate variability of an ECG is pNNx, i.e. the proportion of consecutive NN distances that differ by at least 50 ms. When a premature beat occurs, the preceding and ...
3
votes
1answer
37 views

Does food continue to stay sequential once it is inside my body?

I may be very off on many scientific details here, but I'm always all ears. As far as I understand, any food that is eaten goes to the stomach, gets broke down even further into smaller food ...
3
votes
2answers
483 views

Bernoulli’s Principle in the Cardiovascular System

Below are graphs which illustrate the cross-sectional area, velocity, and fluid pressure through each vascular segment of the cardiovascular system. It makes sense that velocity and cross-sectional ...
3
votes
1answer
37 views

classical conditioning paradigm for hippocampal learning

I wanted to know what a suitable classical conditioning experiment would be to analyze learning and memory capabilities in rodent models with respect to hippocampal long-term potentiation. For ...
3
votes
1answer
51 views

Why do the size of the phase 1 notch vary among cardiac cells?

The size of the phase 1 notch varies among cardiac cells. It is prominent in myocytes in the epicardial and midmyocardial regions of the left ventricular wall and in ventricular Purkinje fibers. ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

Mechanisms of bone growth

The length of a bone is caused by growth of hyaline cartilage which is then replaced by bone tissue. How do cells know whether they should grow the hyaline cartilage? What are the key molecules that ...
3
votes
2answers
183 views

Electronic cigarettes (e-cigs), any health risks?

Background: An electronic cigarette (e-cig or e-cigarette) is a battery-powered device which simulates tobacco smoking patented in 1963 by Herbert A. Gilbert. It generally uses a heating element ...
3
votes
1answer
555 views

What are the highest and lowest possible pH, paCO2 and HCO3 in the blood of living human?

What are the highest and lowest possible values of pH, $paCO_2$, and $HCO_3$ in the (arterial or venous) blood of a living human being?
3
votes
2answers
506 views

Correlation between muscle size and absolute strength

Is there a linear connection between muscle size and the power it can produce? If not, why? And what is the true correlation if any, can it be described with an appropriate function? What other ...
3
votes
1answer
141 views

Attachment of muscles during molting in insects

Normally, insects' muscles are attached to their exoskeleton but what happens to this attachment when they are moulting? Sorry if this is an extremely silly question but I have wondered about it for ...
3
votes
1answer
256 views

Need of Creatinine Phosphate

In muscle cells most of the ATP's phosphate is with creatinine phosphate. So why is the displacement of the phosphate group done ? Is it because creatinine phosphate would give it's phosphate more ...
3
votes
1answer
153 views

How is olfactory acuity rated/measured?

Acuity of one's sight is rated on the 20/20 scale. An online search appeared to indicate there is no comparable 'standard' to rate olfactory acuity. How is acuity of the olfactory system rated?
3
votes
1answer
58 views

What is the effect of reduced gravity on human height?

There has been talk recently of building a base on either the Moon or Mars. What I'm wondering is, if you are born and grow to adulthood on the Moon, where the gravity is a tenth of the Earth's, would ...
3
votes
1answer
69 views

Which is more susceptible to dehydration — extracellular and intracellular fluid?

I want to ask in human body, there is intracellular and extracellular fluid that makes up the total body water of our body, which is drained first when we do activities? extra or intra? if I want to ...
3
votes
1answer
68 views

How is circadian rhythm of gastric acid secretion regulated?

Gastric acid secretion shows a circadian rhythm where acid production in the morning is minimal and it reaches a maximum towards the evening. How is this process regulated?
3
votes
3answers
313 views

What is the difference between meristem and bud?

Keep reading both terms quite frequently while studying plant physiology. I did some research trying to establish their differences and I learnt that meristems are undifferentiated cells that can ...
3
votes
1answer
96 views

What is the impact of stress on the human body?

Can stress trigger any changes in the human body? I'd like to know more about things less commonly known than, for example: sweating and tiredness. What are the long term risks of chronic stress? Do ...
3
votes
2answers
170 views

How does the cell regulate different metabolic pathways?

I heard somewhere that cells use different nucleosides bound to triphosphates e.g. ATP, GTP, CTP and other modified compounds: NADH, NADPH to distinguish between different metabolic pathways and so ...
3
votes
1answer
681 views

How are arms different than legs?

Ok, this is a bit of a tangent question, but it came up yesterday and I didn't know the answer: How are arms and legs defined physiologically? For example, we say humans have two arms and two legs, ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

Hypersensitivity Simultaneously in Ear canals

I got experimental data where hypersensitivity (i.e. tonic pain when touching ear canal) was recognised for about 100 minutes. I do not know which type of hypersensitivity is this one. IgM can ...
3
votes
1answer
279 views

Elevated position effect on recovery times from upper respiratory infections at rest?

In nursing school, they advice for people with upper respiratory infections to be in a slightly elevated position at the head region when sleeping. My intuition of the reason is that the lymphatic ...
3
votes
1answer
587 views

Why is the blood pressure in the superior vena cava during inhalation less than during the exhalation? [closed]

For further investigation into the progress of the blood pressure, we will measure a patient's blood pressure in the superior vena cava measured during inhalation and during an exhalation. His heart ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

How is Hypertonic Urine Produced in a Mammalian Kidney?

I know that the ascending loop of Henle is impermeable to water and ions, and, by end of the ascending limb, the osmolarity of the tubular fluid is very low due to the active transport of ions out ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Physiological indicators of happiness and well being

If I understand it correctly, levels of serotonin in the brain can indicate if a person is happy. What other physiological measures indicate happiness or well being for a humans? I am looking for ...
3
votes
2answers
269 views

Why is most tissue cellular?

Most tissue is comprised of cells. Why? It would seem inefficient to have so many individual nucleus, membranes, etc.? Specifically: Not all tissue is cellular. Much tissue is extracellular matrix. ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

Is there such thing as “biological cycles” of activity/performance/etc in mammals?

I'm looking for some information about the cycles of increased/decreased activity, mental performance or endurance that are related to a mammal's age and the time of a season. First of all, I'm not ...
3
votes
0answers
48 views

What is a common body composition in mammals?

The Physiology Of The Racing Greyhound states that most species have about a 40% muscle mass to body mass ratio. Understanding Body Composition puts "optimal fitness" in humans at 16-25% body fat for ...
3
votes
1answer
82 views

What causes inhalation during breathing?

I have read here that the two major inhalation muscles are the (1) diaphragm and the (2) external intercostals. Additionally, inhalation can also be caused by (1) expansion of the abdominal cavity, ...
3
votes
0answers
66 views

What is the essence of difference of how different chemicals affect the same receptor?

It is known that various chemicals can bind to the same receptor type, producing different effects. Be these chemicals agonists or antagonists, there are more variations in how they influence the ...
3
votes
0answers
30 views

Blood as newtonian flow and Poiseuille law [closed]

For a prep exam: A healtly pacient has a carotid with the following characteristics: intern ratio: 𝑅= 2.8 mm, 𝑃2 = 89 𝑚𝑚𝐻𝑔, 𝑃1 = 90 𝑚𝑚𝐻𝑔, 𝜇blood = 3.5 cp, 𝐿=10.0 cm. Using the ...