The study of the normal function of living organisms and the means by which it is achieved.

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99 views

Why does the arch of aorta coils?

My study materials use the word vesselcompression chamber of aorta to emphasize aorta's elastic property. The arch of the aorta only coils, not its straight part. I think the reason why the arch ...
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1answer
554 views

Excretion of various wastes and water requirement

A common fact is that Ammonia, Urea and Uric acid are the most common excreted metabolites and their removal needs varying amount of water, highest for ammonia (hence suited only for aquatic animals) ...
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1answer
2k views

fibroblast cells and fibers

I am interested in fibroblast cells in human arteries. Here are the things that I am not clear at the moment and I could not find any answer from the literature: What are the dimensions of these ...
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55 views

Deep diving in mammals

Mammals like seals often dive and can remain under water for more than 70 minutes. How do seals know when is it the time to come up?
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128 views

Why do ion concentrations change with different secretion rates in pancreatic juice?

Why is it that when secretory rate increases in the pancreas the concentration of chloride ions decreases, and the concentration of bicarbonate increases in the production of isotonic NaCl secretion? ...
2
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1answer
24 views

Where does the exudate comes from during inflammation?

During inflammation transudate and exudate is formed by vessels. I would like to make sure if it comes from arterioles, venules, or both, and the reason why.
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2answers
151 views

Difference between facilitated diffusion and secondary active transport in cells

Specifically, what is the difference between facilitated diffusion carrier processes (passive transport) and secondary active transport co-transport processes (active transport)? They seem to be the ...
2
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1answer
67 views

How to define drug-resistant or -sensitive cell line when knowing the IC50 values?

I have got the IC50 data for a drug on different cell lines. How to define if the cell line is sensitive or resistant towards this drug? Could anyone tell me how to define this?
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1answer
20 views

How is circadian rhythm of gastric acid secretion regulated?

Gastric acid secretion shows a circadian rhythm where acid production in the morning is minimal and it reaches a maximum towards the evening. How is this process regulated?
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1answer
49 views

Is Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) isohydric or anisohydric species?

Question from a thesis defense list ask me this. But I can't find the exact answer on the internet or in books. In my thesis, I described isohydric plants, for example maize, lupin, pea, poplar. This ...
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1answer
41 views

Why is the resting potential of a neuron so close to the equilibrium potential of K⁺?

I know this has something to do with the K+ leak channel. I just don't understand how. I know that 3 Na+ are pumped out for every 2 K+ pumped in. This makes the cell interior net negative. I know ...
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2answers
82 views

How does the cell regulate different metabolic pathways?

I heard somewhere that cells use different nucleosides bound to triphosphates e.g. ATP, GTP, CTP and other modified compounds: NADH, NADPH to distinguish between different metabolic pathways and so ...
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1answer
411 views

What is the difference between rheobase and threshold?

Neuronal tissues can be excited by electrical stimulation. Two commonly encountered characteristics for electrically stimulating nerve cells is the threshold and the rheobase. My question is what the ...
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130 views

Is there a known glucosepane cross-link breaker?

I read the following on wikipedia: There is, however, no agent known that can break down the most common AGE, glucosepane, which appears 10 to 1,000 times more common in human tissue than any ...
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1answer
41 views

What makes certain obligate anaerobes viable in fermentation starter cultures?

If Propionibacterium are obligate anaerobes (to wit, poisoned by oxygen), what makes 'Dairy' or classical propionibacteria (e.g. P. shermanii, P. jensenii, P. acidicpropionici, et al) viable in ...
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1answer
98 views

Why does crying lead to a running nose and reddened nose tip?

Why do we have a running nose for quite some time after crying? It persists even after we stop crying. Why is it so? I have faced this always. Also, why does our nose redden on crying for long?
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1answer
79 views

Fast standing and the heart's insufficient accommodation of the increased venous return

Assume you are 45 minutes on the supine position. Furthermore: you stand all of a sudden and fast and without sympaticus activity. The venous return (smooth musculature of vessels) accommodates ...
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2answers
179 views

Calcium levels and nerve hyperexcitation

Why does lower blood calcium levels (or lower calcium levels in ECF) cause nervous hyperexcitaton? Why does it cause over stimulation of nerves and muscles and spasmic contractions of muscles? This is ...
2
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1answer
116 views

Sodium levels and blood pressure

Why does low Na+ levels cause hypotension (low blood pressure). Alternatively, why does excessive intake of Na+ cause hypertension or high blood pressure? From what I understand, there are ...
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1answer
78 views

What happens during a Raynauds episode?

Raynaud's phenomenon can be a serious health issue, as the blood flow to the extremities, mainly the fingers is compromised, causing fingers to blanche, and then turn blue. Severe Raynaud's can cause ...
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1answer
60 views

Antibody production in secondary immune response

Can IgG antibodies be produced in the secondary immune response without the help of T cells? Is the affinity of antibody for antigens higher during secondary immune response?
2
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1answer
182 views

Need of Creatinine Phosphate

In muscle cells most of the ATP's phosphate is with creatinine phosphate. So why is the displacement of the phosphate group done ? Is it because creatinine phosphate would give it's phosphate more ...
2
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1answer
495 views

Why is the blood pressure in the superior vena cava during inhalation less than during the exhalation? [closed]

For further investigation into the progress of the blood pressure, we will measure a patient's blood pressure in the superior vena cava measured during inhalation and during an exhalation. His heart ...
2
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1answer
87 views

What is the mechanism behind ventilatory acclimatization?

In my respiratory physiology lectures, my professor explained that hypoxia-induced hyperventilation occurs in 2 stages when people try to acclimate at high altitudes. My question is about the ...
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1answer
2k views

What is the “lifecycle” of an average eschar and what types of cells are involved in each stage?

(after some deliberation in the comments, I've decided to make the question more general) An eschar or "dry scab" often forms at a site of injury over a large cut or sore. It seems as though the ...
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3answers
67 views

What is the difference between meristem and bud?

Keep reading both terms quite frequently while studying plant physiology. I did some research trying to establish their differences and I learnt that meristems are undifferentiated cells that can ...
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0answers
53 views

Biology Experiment Data (Hodgkin-Huxley)

I'm doing research into the Hodgkin-Huxley Model from an electronics/mathematics perspective and I'm looking to find actual numerical results from experiments on squid axons. I want to compare the ...
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41 views

What does salt do to styes?

Styes formed in the eyes are cured by dabbing at them with lukewarm water(I saw this being done many a times as a home remedy.) At times, common salt is added to the water before dabbing. My mother ...
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862 views

Why does skin sometimes suddenly itch when you stretch it? [closed]

Sometimes, when I bend over, areas of my skin like my back can suddenly itch quite intensely. Sometimes it may be another part of my body and the pattern seems to be a part of the skin organ that is ...
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0answers
42 views

How do the symptoms of Sepsis affect heart function?

I have intuition that Sepsis with infection can cause spastic functioning of heart during systole heart working spontaneously in snatches during systole atrial fibrillation first contraction of ...
2
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1answer
426 views

Which is the tissue damaging agent in krokodil (street desomorphine)

I've just read about krokodil and saw some quite hideous pictures about what it does to the human body. I guess just desomorphine alone wouldn't have this effect. Which ingredient(s) causes the ...
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0answers
1k views

What are potential side effects of myostatin inhibitors?

Myostatin inhibitors, which are being developed to treat muscle wasting diseases like muscular dystrophy, are likely to be abused by athletes. What are the potential long-term side-effects of taking a ...
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0answers
110 views

Size of classical liver lobule across species

A classical liver lobule is made up of a central vein and the portal triads. A typical human liver weighs around 3 lbs. , while a typical bovine liver weighs around 12 lbs. I was wondering if anyone ...
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3answers
1k views

Does Darwin's Theory of Evolution refute Terence McKenna theory “Stoned Ape” theory of human evolution?

I haven't read it but I'm asking for a quick answer. As far as I know, Terence McKenna's theory of evolution in humans main concept is that a hominid has tried in their diet psilocybin mushrooms, and ...
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3answers
294 views

What difference does it make in the organism's physiology/metabolism whether oxygen binds reversibly or not?

A follow-up to How does hemoglobin-free blood transport oxygen? I'm unsure about the use of physiology/metabolism in the title there. The question in mind is whether this reversible binding makes an ...
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1answer
62 views

Gastro-intestinal physiology reference

I am a physicist but I have always wanted to understand how my digestion takes place in as much detail as possible. I have no idea about books or reference on the subject of Gastro-intestinal and ...
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2answers
383 views

What gases are needed for humans to breathe?

I will be beginning a science project about sustaining life on space stations. I already know that pure oxygen is harmful for humans but would $O_2$ + $CO_2$ be enough for humans to breathe in or do ...
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1answer
100 views

How much heat can a human sustain? [closed]

For how long can a human sustain a temperature of 180 degrees Fahrenheit (82oC) without damage in a confined place? For instance, suppose a person is sitting in a steam-filled room, without external ...
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1answer
23 views

What is the so called “hepatic glucose production”

I came across this term in my readings but I do not understand how this works. Can someone direct me to some reference as to what this "hepatic" glucose production is all about?
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1answer
317 views

What are the risks of elevating the legs too regularly and when tired?

I started to to think the pathophysiology of elevating legs high next to the wall too often and when you are tired. I think possible manifestations some damage to valves of the veins (No!) because ...
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1answer
46 views

What is ischaemia exactly?

I think it is decreased blood supply to organs and tissues. I also think it is the stopped circulation. However, both ones cannot be right, I think. What is ischaemia exactly?
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1answer
180 views

What is the energy balance of cooking?

If I cook some food, I get apparently several energetic advantages: thermal : the temperature of the food is closer or superior to the temperature of my body or internal organs, so I do not have to ...
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3answers
94 views

Are all healthy animals more likely to defecate near the end of a rest-cycle?

Just what the title states. It stems from observation & personal experience that a person/dog/cat/monkey is more likely to relieve oneself immediately after it wakes up from the peak-sleep cycle ...
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2answers
362 views

Why can newborns swim?

I am wondering for someone to discuss the phenomena that newborn babies (humans) are able to submerge underwater up until a few months where that ability is lost again? What is the explanation for ...
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1answer
48 views

How does ANF increase GFR?

ANF as we know reduce the Na+ uptake and K+ removal in the distal tubules and it also functions as a Vasodialator (?) But again it says that ANF increases the Glomerular filtrate ? But if it is acting ...
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1answer
37 views

Is the sense for salt depending on the electrolyte level in our body?

I often noticed, after (heavy) physical activity like cycling, running, swimming or working an isotonic drink (to recover the electrolyte level) tastes less "salty" compared to when drinking it before ...
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1answer
30 views

How are cyclic hormones characterized?

I have a question regarding the description of a subset of peptide hormones, called cyclic hormones. Two examples of cyclic hormones would be somatostatin and melanin-concentrating hormones. I know ...
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1answer
68 views

Could light/occasional smoking strengthen the lungs?

Here's my thought process, correct me where I'm wrong. It seems the human body has thresholds. Examples: You lift too much weight, and the muscles and tendons risk serious injury, but otherwise ...
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1answer
237 views

Advantage of cup-like shape of blood cells, spores?

Mold spores sometimes have the same shape as platelets in blood. If I were designing a spore it would probably be spherical. Is there any advantage to this cup-like shape? Maybe there is some ...
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78 views

Why are new vessels more permeable in microvasculature?

I know for microvasculature New microvasculature (arterioles, venules) are always more permeable as they lack pericytes. and then I have this sentence about new blood vessels (not specific) ...