The study of the normal function of living organisms and the means by which it is achieved.

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Does breathing air containing 3% carbon dioxide gives you a headache?

As far as I know, breathing air containing relatively high levels of CO2 may get you a headache. I also know that CO2 level in the fruit bodies of peppers can reach levels as high as 3% at certain ...
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54 views

Detailed mechanism of the cause of diabetes mellitus type 1?

I have read in some texts that diabetes mellitus type 1 is caused by degeneration of beta cells due to our body's own immune reaction.Is it true? Can you explain further how are such types of immune ...
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144 views

Biphasic T wave caused by digitalis toxicity

Digitalis is a drug that can be used during coronary insufficiency to increase the strength of cardiac muscle contraction. But when overdosages of digitalis are given, depolarization duration ...
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59 views

Kinesiology Tape Benefits

Recently, kinesiology tape has become popular, especially in CrossFit. I have also noted its' use in the NFL, and I want to say Tennis as well. What beneficial effects does this tape offer our bodies ...
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120 views

What's the mechanism behind 'losing heat through your extremities'?

I can understand how if you are not circulating enough (warm) blood, by not moving much while in a cold environment, your extremities themselves lose heat, and become cold - but I don't understand how ...
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75 views

What makes certain obligate anaerobes viable in fermentation starter cultures?

If Propionibacterium are obligate anaerobes (to wit, poisoned by oxygen), what makes 'Dairy' or classical propionibacteria (e.g. P. shermanii, P. jensenii, P. acidicpropionici, et al) viable in ...
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171 views

Inductance in cell

In an animal cell, especially neuron and in particular its axon, while there is electrical resistance and capacitance mechanism in the cell, which play essential roles in the cable theory model of ...
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113 views

How Ants know about Earthquake?

How does an ant know about Earthquake is it because of an organ or due to other factors?
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102 views

Do Ants have a sense of Direction?

Do ants understand which way is up or down? Could they differentiate between uphill and downhill?
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341 views

How deep does water have to be so a mosquito can lay viable eggs in it?

I read about this idea for a mosquito trap (with a rather tactless name) where the idea seems to be that because the water available for the mosquito eggs is so shallow, they will die somehow or not ...
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108 views

Do insomniacs yawn?

According to wikipedia, the jury is still out on the function a yawn serves. The article referenced above however writes to say Yawning most often occurs in adults immediately before and after ...
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57 views

Does Sirtuin protein family Sir2 work in low-calorie diet mostly?

I am reading about the protein family in relation to the prolongation of cell life. It is known that Sirtuins have been implicated in influencing a wide range of cellular processes like ageing, ...
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152 views

Why does the arch of aorta coils?

My study materials use the word vesselcompression chamber of aorta to emphasize aorta's elastic property. The arch of the aorta only coils, not its straight part. I think the reason why the arch ...
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2k views

Excretion of various wastes and water requirement

A common fact is that Ammonia, Urea and Uric acid are the most common excreted metabolites and their removal needs varying amount of water, highest for ammonia (hence suited only for aquatic animals) ...
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3k views

fibroblast cells and fibers

I am interested in fibroblast cells in human arteries. Here are the things that I am not clear at the moment and I could not find any answer from the literature: What are the dimensions of these ...
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59 views

Deep diving in mammals

Mammals like seals often dive and can remain under water for more than 70 minutes. How do seals know when is it the time to come up?
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231 views

Why do ion concentrations change with different secretion rates in pancreatic juice?

Why is it that when secretory rate increases in the pancreas the concentration of chloride ions decreases, and the concentration of bicarbonate increases in the production of isotonic NaCl secretion? ...
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77 views

How are isovolumetric contraction and afterload related in the cardiac cycle?

In the cardiac cycle isovolumetric contraction occurs and causes a pressure gradient. The "afterload" is the pressure exerted on the ventricle from the artery. Is the afterload the cause of ...
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94 views

How does Celiac's Disease cause people to stop growing?

In all of the sites I've looked on, one of the symptoms of Celiac's Disease is the failure to grow in children. Why would an immune attack against gluten cause stunted growth? Celiac.org states: ...
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44 views

Physiology of tricuspid and bicuspid(mitral) valves

The tricuspid and bicuspid valves are atrioventricular valves. Both are valves that prevent backflow of blood pumped from the atria to the ventricles. However, the former has 3 "flaps" while the ...
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48 views

Where does the exudate comes from during inflammation?

During inflammation transudate and exudate is formed by vessels. I would like to make sure if it comes from arterioles, venules, or both, and the reason why.
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250 views

How to define drug-resistant or -sensitive cell line when knowing the IC50 values?

I have got the IC50 data for a drug on different cell lines. How to define if the cell line is sensitive or resistant towards this drug? Could anyone tell me how to define this?
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89 views

Is Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) isohydric or anisohydric species?

Question from a thesis defense list ask me this. But I can't find the exact answer on the internet or in books. In my thesis, I described isohydric plants, for example maize, lupin, pea, poplar. This ...
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83 views

Why is the resting potential of a neuron so close to the equilibrium potential of K⁺?

I know this has something to do with the K+ leak channel. I just don't understand how. I know that 3 Na+ are pumped out for every 2 K+ pumped in. This makes the cell interior net negative. I know ...
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575 views

Why does crying lead to a running nose and reddened nose tip?

Why do we have a running nose for quite some time after crying? It persists even after we stop crying. Why is it so? I have faced this always. Also, why does our nose redden on crying for long?
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101 views

Fast standing and the heart's insufficient accommodation of the increased venous return

Assume you are 45 minutes on the supine position. Furthermore: you stand all of a sudden and fast and without sympaticus activity. The venous return (smooth musculature of vessels) accommodates ...
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121 views

Physiology of skin and leather: why do salt borders occur?

I discussed a leather store about the white border aka salt border on leather shoes. They said that it is due to inner features of leather and you could try to add some fat/cream to push it back ...
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Calcium levels and nerve hyperexcitation

Why does lower blood calcium levels (or lower calcium levels in ECF) cause nervous hyperexcitaton? Why does it cause over stimulation of nerves and muscles and spasmic contractions of muscles? This is ...
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152 views

Sodium levels and blood pressure

Why does low Na+ levels cause hypotension (low blood pressure). Alternatively, why does excessive intake of Na+ cause hypertension or high blood pressure? From what I understand, there are ...
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87 views

What happens during a Raynauds episode?

Raynaud's phenomenon can be a serious health issue, as the blood flow to the extremities, mainly the fingers is compromised, causing fingers to blanche, and then turn blue. Severe Raynaud's can cause ...
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2k views

What is the physiological difference between snorting/swallowing cocaine

I know that mucosa inside the nose absorbs cocaine molecules when snorting cocaine, but what difference is there compared to swallowing? Also more cocaine administration equals more cocaine molecules ...
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66 views

Antibody production in secondary immune response

Can IgG antibodies be produced in the secondary immune response without the help of T cells? Is the affinity of antibody for antigens higher during secondary immune response?
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5k views

How do inward rectifier potassium channels work in the heart?

Apparently in cardiomyocytes, there is an inward rectifying potassium channel that operates during phase 4 of the cardiomyocyte action potential. I have heard that despite this potassium channel ...
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120 views

What is the mechanism behind ventilatory acclimatization?

In my respiratory physiology lectures, my professor explained that hypoxia-induced hyperventilation occurs in 2 stages when people try to acclimate at high altitudes. My question is about the ...
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3k views

What is the “lifecycle” of an average eschar and what types of cells are involved in each stage?

(after some deliberation in the comments, I've decided to make the question more general) An eschar or "dry scab" often forms at a site of injury over a large cut or sore. It seems as though the ...
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Can one eye affect the other eye's low-light adaption?

This previous question addresses how long eyes need to adapt to darkness and reach full contrast. My question is how does one eye affect the "transition" and/or efficacy of this "night vision" of the ...
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17 views

How to use the law of diffusion in the presence of electric forces?

Isn't the movement of ions affected by the electric field as well? For instance, when a sodium channel in a cell's membrane opens, the sodium ions are said to diffuse into the cell, from higher ...
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17 views

Peculiarity of chemo senses [closed]

We can easily recall our visual stimulus and auditory stimulus but why can't we recall chemical stimulus like smell and pain? We can recall a song or picture but we can't exactly recall smell and ...
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170 views

Skin extra sensitive to heat after burn

I just got my finger burnt (first degree burn $\Rightarrow$ I didn't even bother to bear the wound). It didn't hurt much, even when I pressed the wound. However, when exposed to heat (hot water, but ...
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75 views

Biology Experiment Data (Hodgkin-Huxley)

I'm doing research into the Hodgkin-Huxley Model from an electronics/mathematics perspective and I'm looking to find actual numerical results from experiments on squid axons. I want to compare the ...
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64 views

What does salt do to styes?

Styes formed in the eyes are cured by dabbing at them with lukewarm water(I saw this being done many a times as a home remedy.) At times, common salt is added to the water before dabbing. My mother ...
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Why does skin sometimes suddenly itch when you stretch it? [closed]

Sometimes, when I bend over, areas of my skin like my back can suddenly itch quite intensely. Sometimes it may be another part of my body and the pattern seems to be a part of the skin organ that is ...
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465 views

Which is the tissue damaging agent in krokodil (street desomorphine)

I've just read about krokodil and saw some quite hideous pictures about what it does to the human body. I guess just desomorphine alone wouldn't have this effect. Which ingredient(s) causes the ...
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2k views

What are potential side effects of myostatin inhibitors?

Myostatin inhibitors, which are being developed to treat muscle wasting diseases like muscular dystrophy, are likely to be abused by athletes. What are the potential long-term side-effects of taking a ...
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161 views

Size of classical liver lobule across species

A classical liver lobule is made up of a central vein and the portal triads. A typical human liver weighs around 3 lbs. , while a typical bovine liver weighs around 12 lbs. I was wondering if anyone ...
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217 views

Why do mice have a higher metabolism?

Mice and other small animals have higher metabolic rate than humans. How does that happen on cellular level, if we look on one cell in the mouse body? What is it in this cell that will be ...
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2answers
150 views

What is the effect of persistent hypothermia on cardiac performance?

I define persistent hypothermia in this thread about the mechanisms of persistent hypothermia. The Graph of Katzung et al. in Pharmacology about Heart Failure: I am thinking which parts here are ...
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Does Darwin's Theory of Evolution refute Terence McKenna theory “Stoned Ape” theory of human evolution?

I haven't read it but I'm asking for a quick answer. As far as I know, Terence McKenna's theory of evolution in humans main concept is that a hominid has tried in their diet psilocybin mushrooms, and ...
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3answers
385 views

What difference does it make in the organism's physiology/metabolism whether oxygen binds reversibly or not?

A follow-up to How does hemoglobin-free blood transport oxygen? I'm unsure about the use of physiology/metabolism in the title there. The question in mind is whether this reversible binding makes an ...
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Why do we exhale after we hold our breath?

I tested this out with my friends, and I find that after they hold their breath and can't hold it anymore, they exhale air, instead of inhaling air. Interestingly, they all try to inhale in as much ...