The study of the normal function of living organisms and the means by which it is achieved.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
1answer
25 views

To understand synthesis of e-NOS and n-NOS with respect to Ca and calmodulin

I found this sentence in my notes interesting E-NOS and n-NOS are Ca-calmodulin dependent ferments. They are synthesized in small concentration as a response to physiological signals which ...
1
vote
1answer
933 views

Can food swallowed when a person is upside down reach the stomach?

If a person positions himself upside down and swallows food, will it reach the stomach against gravity? If so how?
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Given an EC50 value, how do I reproduce the sigmoidal curve from which this was calculated?

All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is a potent ligand for a nuclear receptor called retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARa). The concentration of atRA at which RARa is half maximal is 19nM. The dose-response ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Is Norepinephrine beta2 adrenomimetic?

I know that it has alpha1, alpha2 and beta1 effects. It has beta2 receptor where epinephrine can effect. However, to say that it is beta adrenomimetic, I am not sure. That is ligand binding beta2 ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Does pupil size affect image focus in persons with no lens?

If an individual has no lens like Claude Monet (who had them removed). They should be able to still focus the images they see in a well light area if they shrink their pupils to a very small size ...
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Why is LH level much higher than FSH level at ovulation?

My teacher showed us an elaborate collection of graphs with one of them showing FSH and LH plasma levels during the menstrual cycle. LH level was almost 3 times higher than FSH level. Why? Does this ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

All or nothing phenomena

We know that an action potential is produced by an active cell membrane when the stimulus reaches a certain threshold. When it does, an action potential fires, and when it doesn't, nothing happens. ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

brain activity responsible for imagination

Which part of brain is responsible for advance or unseen imagination For example:ones brain can make a situation in mind which is impossible to happen ...which part of brain is hyper active?
1
vote
1answer
29 views

What triggers the release of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone with the onset of puberty?

I am interested to know the process of development of puberty. During puberty, when boys/girls reache 12-14 (puberty) years of their age, their hypothalamus releases gonadotropin releasing hormone ...
1
vote
1answer
108 views

Why the scent of mouth gets dirty after not eating for a long time?

After a long time of hard workout,not eating and nervousness makes your taste and scent of mouth very uncomfortable and bad why this happens and is there any way to prevent it?
1
vote
1answer
89 views

Simultaneously using both hands - How does that work?

Is some part in one hemisphere the decision maker and "calling the shots" - controlling the opposite side's hand "directly" and controlling its own side's hand through the corpus callosum. Or: is ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

difference between ischemia and oxygen-glucose deprived medium

Ischemia is roughly defined as insufficient blood flow to a specific region of the body and in the literature it is generally considered as causing oxygen and glucose deprivation in the tissue and ...
1
vote
1answer
126 views

Earwax versus Mucus

Something I have wondered for a while is why have two different primary defense mediums, ie earwax and mucus, that perform the same function? As far as I know, mucus and earwax are both part of the ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Nervous system: Pain and Pleasure?

If you have a constant pain in your body, why does a greater pain or pleasure make you not feel the original pain?
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Missing 4$H_2O$s (per glucose) in Cellular Respiration… Where can they be?

I having trouble understanding the equation of the cellular respiration. The thing that bothers me is the number of $H_2O$ molecules. Generally, cellular respiration is written thus : $C_6H_{12}O_6 + ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Are there any forms of heart failure where cell size decreases?

I think hypertrophy happens in most of the cases. However, I am not sure if hypertrophy always happens. I started to think about wet lungs (pulmonary reason for the left-sided heart failure). Can the ...
1
vote
2answers
188 views

Hypovolemia and orthostatic hypertension

What is the physiological mechanism behind the occurrence of orthostatic hypertension in the presence of hypovolemia?
1
vote
1answer
31 views

What are the movement mechanisms of thrombus?

I am thinking how thrombus (veins, arteries and heart) can move. Secondary mechanisms come to my mind only: some enzyme which lyses it, probably adhesion mechanism. Blood circulation (flow rate) ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

Voltage-gated Potassium channels in the action potential of cardiomyocyte?

There is one type of potassium voltage-gated channels open in Phase 1 too. Some call them early repolarization channels. I am not convinced that the channels are different in different phases: 0, 2, ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Physiology of skin and leather: why do salt borders occur?

I discussed a leather store about the white border aka salt border on leather shoes. They said that it is due to inner features of leather and you could try to add some fat/cream to push it back ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

(Web)app to search metabolic/signalling pathways

I'm looking for an application where you can find pathways by selecting a chemical occurring in it. So, for example, selecting 6-phosphogluconolactone brings up the pentose phosphate pathway or any ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Amphibian blood circulation

In an amphibian blood entering the right atrium shows higher levels of oxygenation than that in left atrium when : A.It is hyperactivated B.it is hibernating C.it is submerged D.it is in the ...
1
vote
1answer
904 views

What is the physiological difference between snorting/swallowing cocaine

I know that mucosa inside the nose absorbs cocaine molecules when snorting cocaine, but what difference is there compared to swallowing? Also more cocaine administration equals more cocaine molecules ...
1
vote
1answer
82 views

What stops the coagulation process?

Whenever there are minor/major injury to blood vessels, the platelets, fibrin, thrombin, etc. are recruited. They then seal the wound and block bleeding. What tells them that their job is done?
1
vote
2answers
178 views

What use a pair of lips?

Pardon my ignorance ... A lip is apparently a very sensitive tactile device - as it at-least serves to warn it's owner they may just be about to consume something that could cause injury. Primates ...
1
vote
1answer
103 views

Is stereo olfactory ability restricted to humans?

Most animals I see around seem to have two nostrils - humans, snakes, birds, fish .. and so on. From reading online I see that 2 nostrils provide a stereo olfactory effect. This stereo effect is ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Why can we control our breath rate but not our heart rate? [closed]

Even though we cannot survive for more than few minutes if we stop breathing or if our heart stops, why is it so that our heart beat is controlled involuntarily while breathing can be voluntarily ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

How many mitotic divisions do haploid cells undergo before fertilization?

Background This question is about human physiology and gametogenesis. A spermatozoid is not necessarily the direct "offspring" of diploid cell. Stated differently, a spermatozoid cell can be the ...
1
vote
0answers
11 views

Does creatine-phosphate (CP) supplementation regenerate NADH?

I have the following facts: It is possible to convert ATP <-> creatine vice-versa. (ref - non scientific) CP supplementation protects against metabolic syndrome. ref1 ref2 Fructose digestion ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

How is ATP involved in muscle contraction?

The sliding filament mechanism as explained by my text does not elaborate on how ATP is involved in the cross bridge binding and contraction process. How does muscle contraction utilize ATP? In my ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

how food moves in horizontal coils of small intestines [duplicate]

This is a very very basic question, and I am looking at it more from point of view of physics. The small intestine is a highly coiled structure, which means it has horizontal coils as well. I can ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

Would blue light be effective to help average people when sunsets come much earlier in the day?

I know people with SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) benefit from blue light in the winter as night-time comes much earlier (in the UK, sunset is around 4pm in December, compared to 9pm in June). ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

How do you accurately measure anguiliform (eel) locomotion?

In one of my courses, we were discussing a paper by Muller and van Leeuwen (2006) which made a lot of comparisons the differences between carangiform (mullet) and anguilliform (eel) locomotion. While ...
1
vote
3answers
110 views

Resilience to the neurotoxins of Indian King Cobra

I read on Wikipedia about this: King Cobra - Wikipedia In Thailand, a concoction of alcohol and the ground root of turmeric is ingested, which has been clinically shown to create a strong ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Physiology of benign eye twitching?

About four times in my life I have experienced the feeling of my eyelid fluttering for a few minutes by itself, and then it stops. I have talked to other people who have had the same experience so I ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

Is there a known glucosepane cross-link breaker?

I read the following on wikipedia: There is, however, no agent known that can break down the most common AGE, glucosepane, which appears 10 to 1,000 times more common in human tissue than any ...
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Why are there no animals with a length greater than 30-40 meters or with a mass greater than 200 tonnes? [duplicate]

The biggest and heaviest aquatic animal is the blue whale: 30 meters long and a mass of 200 tonnes. The biggest and heaviest terrestrial animal was a Sauropod (plant-eating, long-necked dinosaur): 40 ...
1
vote
0answers
15 views

What biological processes are affected by dietary fiber besides peristalsis?

Dietary fiber affects the rate of peristalsis, but what other effects does it have? Does fiber affect signal transduction, hydration, the autonomic nervous system, organ function, other biological ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Can non-carbonated energy drinks boost alcohol intoxication?

I just read news article about banning caffeine in alcohol drinks and about that energy drinks increase the urge to drink alcohol. Energy drinks cause sugar intoxication - answer about it here ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Vitamin D oral intake, transportation and absorption

Several factors affecting vitamin D and its active form absorption and storage acidity of stomach (not significant effect) cytopathic effects of viruses cytopathic effects of bacteria where the ...
1
vote
0answers
100 views

What is the nature of action potentials in autonomic nervous system?

My conjecture is that the natures of sympathetic and parasympathetic action potentials are different. My findings propose me that sympathetic action potential is little longer lasting than ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

What are the mechanisms of disabling extrinsic control of heart?

I started this thread by thinking this question but I developed it further below What is the mechanism maintaining refractory period of pacemakers? My conjecture is that the mechanism is the ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

Nearly Exhaustive List for Cholesterol Pathways [closed]

I have run across an interesting case that is similar to only two others I've encountered. What makes it interesting is the combination of undetectable (under normal testing conditions, can elaborate ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

To define the total Resistance of Systemic Blood Circulation

Some systems are in parallel. For instance, the resistance of lungs $R_{\text{lungs}}$. Assume here for simplicity that these parallel systems can be handled linearly. We also consider only Total ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

Is end-systolic volume (ESV) the same as residual volume?

I am reading this site and my study materials. The end-systolic volume (ESV), 50-60 ml, is the volume of blood found in ventricles after systole and contraction of ventricles. I think ESV is the same ...
0
votes
2answers
126 views

What is the name of the condition where no pacemaker cells are active in the heart for a short-time?

Assume that the heart is beating, but no pacemaker cells are working for at least 15 seconds. This would be a very long compensatory pause if extrasystole started it. There may be some low frequent ...
0
votes
1answer
102 views

Similarity between a heart attack and a spasm

When someone is having a heart attack, could it be considered , in some situations, a spasm? Below, I have written how I believe the process may work. The heart is basically a muscle working ...
0
votes
2answers
93 views

Can you disconnect sensation from the brain without destroying muscle functions?

I want to know if it would be possible for a surgeon to "shut off" a person's senses without causing paralysis of any kind. The person would have to maintain their ability to speak and move, but not ...
0
votes
3answers
731 views

Why do we exhale after we hold our breath?

I tested this out with my friends, and I find that after they hold their breath and can't hold it anymore, they exhale air, instead of inhaling air. Interestingly, they all try to inhale in as much ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Normal Frequencies in Heart

I am trying to visualise possible ranges of frequencies from different structures of heart: different valves and their possible frequencies heart sounds I - IV and their normal frequencties what can ...