The study of the normal function of living organisms and the means by which it is achieved.

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1answer
789 views

Why does crying lead to a running nose and reddened nose tip?

Why do we have a running nose for quite some time after crying? It persists even after we stop crying. Why is it so? I have faced this always. Also, why does our nose redden on crying for long?
5
votes
1answer
210 views

By what mechanism can hypoglycemia induce fainting?

Hypoglycemia (Low blood sugar) is said to be among the potential causes of human-faintings. I was wondering by which mechanism this happens. Google search results are abundant; there are lists of ...
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1answer
2k views

Does the human ear adapt to noise levels?

I have noticed lately that if I go to sleep, when I have my radio running, it is on lowest volume, I still consider it kind of loud. In the morning, when being on the edge of waking up, I hear the ...
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0answers
3k views

Why does skin sometimes suddenly itch when you stretch it? [closed]

Sometimes, when I bend over, areas of my skin like my back can suddenly itch quite intensely. Sometimes it may be another part of my body and the pattern seems to be a part of the skin organ that is ...
2
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1answer
116 views

How Ants know about Earthquake?

How does an ant know about Earthquake is it because of an organ or due to other factors?
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1answer
112 views

Do Ants have a sense of Direction?

Do ants understand which way is up or down? Could they differentiate between uphill and downhill?
7
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1answer
182 views

Disproportion in cranial nerve innervation?

The cranial nerve innervation is highly disproportionate, as far as humans are concerned. I am not sure of the advantage of being innervated by cranial nerve versus being innervated by a normal ...
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1answer
58 views

Can lymph be in peripheral blood?

I read an argument that 1-3% of lymph is in peripheral blood. However, I am not sure if this lymph is about lymphocytes in peripheral blood; not lymph itself. Lymph gets exchanged between capillaries ...
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2answers
483 views

Hypovolemia and orthostatic hypertension

What is the physiological mechanism behind the occurrence of orthostatic hypertension in the presence of hypovolemia?
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1answer
142 views

Enlargement of thyroid gland

Why does thyroid gland enlarge both in hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism? Hypothyroid goitre is due to lack of iodine in diet and hyperthyroid goitre (Exopthalmic goitre, Grave's disease) is due to ...
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1answer
81 views

Can tubular secretion regarded as local hormone?

Tubular secretion is : The process in which ions and other waste products are transported into the distal tubules of the nephron. can it be regarded as local hormone??
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1answer
443 views

Mechanism of antiperistalsis

What is the mechanism of antiperistalsis that occurs during vomiting? Why the peristaltic waves normally don't propagate in anal to oral direction? Please give logical explanation with authentic ...
2
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1answer
109 views

Do insomniacs yawn?

According to wikipedia, the jury is still out on the function a yawn serves. The article referenced above however writes to say Yawning most often occurs in adults immediately before and after ...
6
votes
1answer
246 views

How is hibernation/aestivation different from anesthesia?

How do hibernation/aestivation happen? I read on wikipedia that a squirrel injected with the body fluids of a hibernating fellow is more prone to hibernation. If hibernation/aestivation are driven ...
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1answer
131 views

Simultaneously using both hands - How does that work?

Is some part in one hemisphere the decision maker and "calling the shots" - controlling the opposite side's hand "directly" and controlling its own side's hand through the corpus callosum. Or: is ...
4
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1answer
145 views

What is the reason behind more severe proteinuria in nephrotic syndrome than in nephritic syndrome?

Why is there less protein loss via urine in case of nephritic syndrome than in case of nephrotic syndrome?
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1answer
100 views

difference between ischemia and oxygen-glucose deprived medium

Ischemia is roughly defined as insufficient blood flow to a specific region of the body and in the literature it is generally considered as causing oxygen and glucose deprivation in the tissue and ...
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1answer
41 views

Is the sense for salt depending on the electrolyte level in our body?

I often noticed, after (heavy) physical activity like cycling, running, swimming or working an isotonic drink (to recover the electrolyte level) tastes less "salty" compared to when drinking it before ...
3
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1answer
188 views

How is olfactory acuity rated/measured?

Acuity of one's sight is rated on the 20/20 scale. An online search appeared to indicate there is no comparable 'standard' to rate olfactory acuity. How is acuity of the olfactory system rated?
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1answer
58 views

How does a blunt force stimulate histamine to develop early stages of inflammation?

I know that viruses and sharp forces can stimulate mast cells by cut or by a virus infecting them and then release histamine. How can blunt force do this and cause inflammation? It doesn't have the ...
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1answer
44 views

How are cyclic hormones characterized?

I have a question regarding the description of a subset of peptide hormones, called cyclic hormones. Two examples of cyclic hormones would be somatostatin and melanin-concentrating hormones. I know ...
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1answer
530 views

How deep does water have to be so a mosquito can lay viable eggs in it?

I read about this idea for a mosquito trap (with a rather tactless name) where the idea seems to be that because the water available for the mosquito eggs is so shallow, they will die somehow or not ...
6
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2answers
164 views

What type of force holds my body rigid & doesn't make it collapse?

My query is that as atoms & its molecules have inter & intra molecular forces,like that only what type of force keeps the cells bonded to each other & prevent it from collapsing ever since....
3
votes
1answer
628 views

Antihistamine's effect on insulin secretion and tiredness

Antihistamines are known to cause tiredness. The essential hormones of the body are insulin (glucose), parathyroid hormone (calcium) and aldosterone (Na-K ATPase, sodium). I am thinking how this ...
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0answers
59 views

Vitamin D oral intake, transportation and absorption

Several factors affecting vitamin D and its active form absorption and storage acidity of stomach (not significant effect) cytopathic effects of viruses cytopathic effects of bacteria where the ...
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0answers
29 views

Prenatal hyperkinetic dysfunction and its effect on endurace

Do people with an hyperkinetic dysfuntion have a better endurance? Are they fitter in cause of their Dopamine-overdose or any other reason? I have a case, where someone does not do any sports, but ...
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1answer
108 views

Could light/occasional smoking strengthen the lungs?

Here's my thought process, correct me where I'm wrong. It seems the human body has thresholds. Examples: You lift too much weight, and the muscles and tendons risk serious injury, but otherwise ...
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1answer
326 views

what are the mechanics of sweating?

The causes of sweating aside, i.e. I'm not interested in which and how nerve signals are transmitted to sweat glands. But I would like to read a detailed account on what a sweat gland consists of, ...
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1answer
26 views

Polarized epithelium and localization of ion channels

I'm trying to learn more about polarized epithelial cells of the gut. I am familiar with classic brush border transporters localized to the apical memebrane to facilitate nutrient absorption. I am ...
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1answer
41 views

To characterise diameter of capillaries in organs

I know that there exist Continuous capillaries (skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, connective tissue, pulmonary circulation), Fenestrated capillaries (small intestine, renal glomerulus, exocrine glands),...
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1answer
37 views

Are there any forms of heart failure where cell size decreases?

I think hypertrophy happens in most of the cases. However, I am not sure if hypertrophy always happens. I started to think about wet lungs (pulmonary reason for the left-sided heart failure). Can the ...
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1answer
99 views

Fibrinous inflammation, exudate and scarring in monotonous movements and ageing

I have palpated many hard organs during my work and studies. I have seen many young and old people who have hard organs, like very hard shoulder - very common. I have interviewed some of them, some ...
7
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1answer
658 views

Crusty eyes in the morning

Often, after waking up from a night's sleep hard, flaky, pale yellow crystals are deposited around the eyelids (which easily wash off with water). What are these? Why are they yellow? What are they ...
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1answer
73 views

Does Sympaticus and lymphatic circulation cause feeling of thirsty after short shower?

I have been reading blogs, Guyton and Pocock about what triggers the feeling of thirsty. I am not convinced that is the fact of warm water time is short so not much water lost Assume that the ...
3
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1answer
156 views

How does regurgitated food go to the 3rd stomach chamber instead of going to the 1st?

Ruminants are known for their regurgitation of food; the food goes through the 1st and 2nd stomach chambers, then returns to the oral cavity in cuds. The cuds then come back into the stomach, but this ...
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1answer
651 views

Advantage of cup-like shape of blood cells, spores?

Mold spores sometimes have the same shape as platelets in blood. If I were designing a spore it would probably be spherical. Is there any advantage to this cup-like shape? Maybe there is some ...
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3answers
198 views

Is it possible to have life in vacuum?

I just got struck by curiosity now: Intuition says no, but I've never had confirmation of it.
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1answer
61 views

Effect of respiration on Arterial pressure

I am trying to explain the effect of respiration on arterial pressure. I am looking preferably some visual way to show it. How can you show the effect of respiration on arterial pressure? I am ...
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2answers
178 views

Can the body of any organism on Earth live without impairment both in vacuum, and within Earth's atmosphere?

I know from reading that a human in vacuum needs a space-suit to survive. Is the body of any organism on Earth capable of living equally in vacuum, and on/below Earth's surface within the atmosphere?...
6
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1answer
280 views

Task-dependent “reversed” handedness: why use left hand for some tasks? How is it controlled by the brain?

I am right-handed. Which means that when I hammer down a nail, I hold the nail in my left hand, with which I can hold it straight and at a controlled position. This is true in situations where the ...
4
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1answer
313 views

Why mosquito bite is confined to a certain shape?

I think this problem should be asked in a physiology forum rather than biology@ stackex but I'll give it a try. So my question is simple - why a mosquito bite is usually confined to a certain shape (...
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votes
4answers
430 views

Why do the humans become sleepy after meals?

I don't know about all the mankind, but I know enough people, who becomes sleepy after their meals. Also, I'm not sure, what kind of food do they consume, but I personally get sleepy almost from any ...
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1answer
88 views

Missing 4$H_2O$s (per glucose) in Cellular Respiration… Where can they be?

I having trouble understanding the equation of the cellular respiration. The thing that bothers me is the number of $H_2O$ molecules. Generally, cellular respiration is written thus : $C_6H_{12}O_6 + ...
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1answer
758 views

Earwax versus Mucus

Something I have wondered for a while is why have two different primary defense mediums, ie earwax and mucus, that perform the same function? As far as I know, mucus and earwax are both part of the ...
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0answers
42 views

Which reflex arcs work in Heart with extrasystoles?

I am researching what is triggering the extrasystoles - initial idea from this thread about Which ionic channels of Pacemakers can work in very low frequencies in extrasystole? I am interested in the ...
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1answer
36 views

Which ionic channels of Pacemakers can work in very low frequencies in extrasystole?

At frequency 0-3 Hz. Like computer processors which can work at low frequencies and controlling under- and overvoltage. Normal most significant channels are Ca2+ and K+ that are changing. However, I ...
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2answers
182 views

Is Sinus node conduction necessary for heart beating?

Assume a patient with previous cardial infaction which SA node not possible to activate action potential anymore. However, SA trying to beat unsuccessfully repeatedly waisting energy. Therefore, I ...
7
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1answer
469 views

Why is membrane potential not zero at equilibrium?

For the squid giant axon, the membrane potential computed by the Goldman equation is -60mV. And the Nernst potentials are (the differences between the K+ and the Na+'s Nernst potential and the ...
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1answer
81 views

Nervous system: Pain and Pleasure?

If you have a constant pain in your body, why does a greater pain or pleasure make you not feel the original pain?
3
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1answer
80 views

Difference in reptile inner ear and otosclerosis

In reptiles, the sound is conducted from the tympanic membrane to the inner ear by a single bone. In the disease otosclerosis the stapes of humans become fused to the other middle ear bones( or to ...