The study of the normal function of living organisms and the means by which it is achieved.

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Is Norepinephrine beta2 adrenomimetic?

I know that it has alpha1, alpha2 and beta1 effects. It has beta2 receptor where epinephrine can effect. However, to say that it is beta adrenomimetic, I am not sure. That is ligand binding beta2 ...
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12 views

How can succinylcholine cause myorelaxation?

I first thought that this is because of prolonged depolarisations. However, I am not sure anymore, because after reading PubChem, the only possible pathways are are Choline agonist. So I would say ...
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1answer
10 views

Ephedrine or pseudoephedrine indirectly central alpha2 mimetic?

I started to think this problem by first thinking if the alpha2 mimetism is possible in either case. It seems to be indirectly in either one. Ephedrine seems to have more prominent effect in CNS. ...
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2answers
33 views

Resilience to the neurotoxins of Indian King Cobra

I read on Wikipedia about this: King Cobra - Wikipedia In Thailand, a concoction of alcohol and the ground root of turmeric is ingested, which has been clinically shown to create a strong ...
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57 views

What is the difference between rheobase and threshold?

Neuronal tissues can be excited by electrical stimulation. Two commonly encountered characteristics for electrically stimulating nerve cells is the threshold and the rheobase. My question is what the ...
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1answer
34 views

Does pupil size affect image focus in persons with no lens?

If an individual has no lens like Claude Monet (who had them removed). They should be able to still focus the images they see in a well light area if they shrink their pupils to a very small size ...
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2answers
180 views

How is membrane capacitance related to the increased speed of saltatory conduction?

Here is the original question which inspired my question. As explained by the answers there, the reason saltatory conduction in myelinated neurons is faster than non-myelinated conduction is because ...
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2answers
1k views

Can human organs be transplanted indefinitely?

I watched this movie, where they rented hearts to people for a year. I wonder if it is possible to transplant a heart indefinitely from person to person, or does the heart have a lifetime? So, do ...
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1answer
71 views

How are arms different than legs?

Ok, this is a bit of a tangent question, but it came up yesterday and I didn't know the answer: How are arms and legs defined physiologically? For example, we say humans have two arms and two legs, ...
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71 views

What are the physiological roles of Hydrogen sulfide?

I am thinking why hydrogen sulfide has its effects in the body. For instance, it is one Salmonella's virulence factor. I am not sure if such a balance equations holds H2O + H2S ←→ ... Actually, I ...
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13 views

Where can I find the details of kinematics data, physical parameters, and anatomical data of the forelimbs and hindlimb of a kind of horse?

Now, I am doing a simulation of horses, and some basic data, such as weight, height, species should be obtained to model a virtual horse. I am a student of engineering, and want to find some ...
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98 views

Does muscle get bigger by increase in size of individual cells or increase in number?

Somewhere in the back of my mind, I have the claim that a muscle never increases its amount of cells but, if the muscle gets bigger, it's simply because individual cells get bigger. The book Anatomy ...
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57 views

Do human visual functions degenerate due to genetic factors or by external factors?

Does eyesight primarily deteriorate 'naturally' due to genetics (genomic/epigenomic factors), or due to external factors such as normal wear and tear, or disease? By normal wear and tear I include ...
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24 views

Does vitamin D form crystals in the blood with calcium and magnesium?

I read on a vitamin-D product (2000NE) that I should not use calcium and magnesium with it, because it can result crystal formation in the blood. I googled, but find anything about this. Is it true? ...
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2answers
24 views

How does the cell regulate different metabolic pathways?

I heard somewhere that cells use different nucleosides bound to triphosphates e.g. ATP, GTP, CTP and other modified compounds: NADH, NADPH to distinguish between different metabolic pathways and so ...
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1answer
32 views

Does the cellular response to every receptor work the same way?

I heard somewhere that activating any receptor results in the same intracellular response (signaling) which involves NF-κB. If that is true, I hardly understand how the cells distinguish between ...
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3answers
2k views

Is there any use of CO₂ in human body?

We all know CO₂ as a waste product of metabolism . Does CO₂ have any helpful role , apart from having a role in pH of blood ?
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89 views

What is atrial fibrillation?

I am wondering exactly what a-fib is (causes and symptoms). I would really appreciate having a sample of an EKG with it (because in my limited research, I have found it nearly impossible to find just ...
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1answer
31 views

Why is LH level much higher than FSH level at ovulation?

My teacher showed us an elaborate collection of graphs with one of them showing FSH and LH plasma levels during the menstrual cycle. LH level was almost 3 times higher than FSH level. Why? Does this ...
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30 views

Examples of genes involved in plastic responses

Adaptive plasticity involves sensing the environment and responding adaptively to it. Intuitively, I would think that this process may ask for a more or less complex genetic machinery of regulation of ...
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2answers
71 views

How do diving marine mammals avoid decompression sickness?

How do marine mammals, whose very survival depends on regular diving, manage to avoid decompression sickness or "the bends?" Do they, indeed, avoid it?
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1answer
50 views

Fast standing and the heart's insufficient accommodation of the increased venous return

Assume you are 45 minutes on the supine position. Furthermore: you stand all of a sudden and fast and without sympaticus activity. The venous return (smooth musculature of vessels) accommodates ...
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1answer
56 views

What is the mechanism behind ventilatory acclimatization?

In my respiratory physiology lectures, my professor explained that hypoxia-induced hyperventilation occurs in 2 stages when people try to acclimate at high altitudes. My question is about the ...
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20 views

How many cells are there in an apical meristem?

How many cells are there in the apical meristematic tissue? Looking at this picture... I would tend to think that there are few hundreds (maybe only a hundred) cells in the meristem tissue. But I ...
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1answer
92 views

Why the scent of mouth gets dirty after not eating for a long time?

After a long time of hard workout,not eating and nervousness makes your taste and scent of mouth very uncomfortable and bad why this happens and is there any way to prevent it?
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2answers
769 views

Ill effects of urea and NH₃ on metabolism

What exactly does urea do that harms our body? Does it interfere with our cellular processes or disturbs the colloidal onchotic pressure of our blood? I have heard that NH3 damages the brain. What ...
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45 views

Does eating antacid (such as Magnesia) before meal have any impact on digestion?

During an anatomy lecture I heard of the importance of the acidity of gastric acid (e.g., killing microorganisms, dissolving food, being a factor for triggering further processes). If a healthy person ...
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90 views

Why do I feel funny in my tummy when riding a virtual roller coaster?

I've ridden a virtual roller coaster on an Oculus Rift. I felt tension as I went up to the top, but more interestingly I actually felt my stomach drop when I went down the steep drop on the other ...
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1answer
75 views

Mechanism of Muscle Growth

According to this video (sorry for the poor reference but it represents my level of understanding in physiology), muscle grow as a consequence of repairing micro-lesions. How are these micro-lesions ...
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701 views

How are our senses dimmed during sleep?

Our senses are not as sensitive during sleep compared to wake. There is an arousal threshold during sleep that only when it is overcome will it wake a person up. My question is how is this arousal ...
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1answer
24 views

Recovery from a more severe injury can be shorter than from a less severe one [closed]

I vaguely remember reading somewhere that in certain cases, recovery from a more severe injury can occur faster than from a less severe injury. This was motivated by claiming that the less severe ...
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2answers
79 views

What is called the condition where no pacemaker cells are active in heart for short-time?

Assume that the heart is beating but no pacemaker cells is working for at least 15 seconds. This would be very long compensatory pause if extrasystole started it. There may be some low frequent ...
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42 views

What is the effective line detected by ML II channel in ECG?

I want to find the approximate effective path/line on the heart that ML II channel detects on the heart. The normal ECG angle is 59 angle. ML II channel, which is a combination of two bipolar leads, ...
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1answer
16 views

Does re polarization of muscle fibers mean that the muscle bundle is relaxed?

If I flex my bicep and continue to contract it does it mean that the muscle cells are in depolarizing state and not re polarizing?
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1answer
45 views

What are the risks of elevating the legs too regularly and when tired?

I started to to think the pathophysiology of elevating legs high next to the wall too often and when you are tired. I think possible manifestations some damage to valves of the veins (No!) because ...
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17 views

Physiology of benign eye twitching?

About four times in my life I have experienced the feeling of my eyelid fluttering for a few minutes by itself, and then it stops. I have talked to other people who have had the same experience so I ...
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2answers
8k views

What could cause hairs to gray at the tips but not the roots?

I have noticed that some of my sporadic gray hairs are gray at the tip side but oddly, not near the roots. Some are even only gray in the middle. I find all of this very counter intuitive, and I ...
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1answer
17 views

What is the difference between the basal membrane and the basal lamina?

I'm researching about the basal lamina in lung tissue and I'm not sure if the basal membrane is the same. What is the difference between them?
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29 views

Which organs in the body are responsible for measuring temperature?

As an instrumentation engineer, I have designed temperature control systems capable of measuring and controlling temperature with a precision of 0.001K over a wide temperature range. I have always ...
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9 views

Does dendrite have Na/K electrical channels?

Does dendrite have Na/K electrical channels if not so how can we sense the touche/pain/scald in our skin because we learned that Na/K electrical channels are present only in nerve fibers (axon).In ...
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1answer
50 views

NADH inhibits gluconeogenesis?

I was told in a physiology lecture that alcohol inhibits gluconeogenesis because 'NADH produced from ethanol catabolism leads to product inhibition'. But is NADH not a reactant coenzyme of ...
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20 views

Is there a known glucosepane cross-link breaker?

I read the following on wikipedia: There is, however, no agent known that can break down the most common AGE, glucosepane, which appears 10 to 1,000 times more common in human tissue than any ...
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31 views

Why are there no animals with a length greater than 30-40 meters or with a mass greater than 200 tonnes?

The biggest and heaviest aquatic animal is the blue whale: 30 meters long and a mass of 200 tonnes. The biggest and heaviest terrestrial animal was a Sauropod (plant-eating, long-necked dinosaur): 40 ...
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1answer
413 views

How long can a bee surive in a jar?

So, some people and I encountered an adventure game where you have a bee in a jar and need to move it from place to place before it suffocates, and someone tried to find out how long a bee would ...
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1answer
109 views

cellular respiration

What are the effects of addition of these chemicals to actively respiring cells ? Which of them would lead to INHIBITION of aerobic respiration ? Would cytochromes be actually taken up by cells ? ...
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4answers
6k views

What is the cause of muscle cramps?

According to wikipedia, muscle cramps are caused by myosin fibers not being able to break free from the actin filaments during contraction, resulting in a prolonged contraction. Obviously a lack of ...
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3answers
234 views

What difference does it make in the organism's physiology/metabolism whether oxygen binds reversibly or not?

A follow-up to How does hemoglobin-free blood transport oxygen? I'm unsure about the use of physiology/metabolism in the title there. The question in mind is whether this reversible binding makes an ...
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2answers
2k views

How do insects breathe?

Do ants even breathe? If they don't, how do they stay alive? On what resources do they depend upon to stay alive? How are they different form mammals?
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43 views

Where can I find approximate rates of sequestration of CO₂ for different species of algae?

For a study, I want to compare the rates of CO₂ sequestration and fixation of a few different species of algae. I could not find any data on the sequestration rates. Any pointers to where I can find ...
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1answer
152 views

Why can CO₂ be transported dissolved in plasma?

Is it because CO2 is more soluble in water or has it got to do with the alkaline pH of plasma ?I here mean only aqueous CO2 transport from body cells to lungs.