The study of the form and internal structures of plants.

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Why do Lapidaria margaretae look like stones?

Previous Research I stumbled across a trending reddit post "Lapidaria margaretae looks like stones" (as of 3rd Februrary 2015); but I could not find discussions as to reasons behind why. Question/s ...
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38 views

What are the white spots?

What are these white spots? It's like Braille writing or something. How is the appearance encoded in the plant? (which I think is a Pine, though I am not sure).
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1answer
51 views

How well does the radius of a tree correlate with its age?

I'm looking for a cheap non-invasive ways to approximate the age of a tree (a birch). Measuring the radius pops up in the mind as the first alternative. How would one do that? Measure at multiple ...
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2answers
43 views

How to preserve leaves between sampling (collection) and analysis?

Suppose I spend a day in a forest, collecting different kinds of leaves, which I would like to analyze under a compound microscope. Now, obviously, measures should be taken to preserve the leaves some ...
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27 views

Is there any tree or other plant that produces a new crop in fast cycles? [closed]

Is there any tree or other plant that produces a new crop in fast cycles? By fast I would mean something much more often than once or twice a year, like every month or every few weeks. What is the ...
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32 views

How does trees know to balance themselves so that they never fall down [duplicate]

Well i was flying kites today I saw a tree and its branches were spread around in random directions... I would like to know that how do these trees know to nourish their branches in some direction so ...
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1answer
49 views

Which sex of trees bears fruit? [closed]

Which sex of trees bears fruit? The males or females? And what specifically cause that one to bear fruit. Is it the same as it is with blossoms in trees?
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1answer
60 views

What does the empty space in the bamboo stem do?

Is the empty space inside a bamboo stem a xylem? And why is the space so large?
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234 views

Why should plants transform glucose into sucrose before transporting it to other parts?

I've learned that plants transform glucose into sucrose before sending it into phloem. But the process seems to be complex and energy comsuming. Why should plants do it? Is it really necessary?
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1answer
55 views

Ants eating bark [closed]

Was out walking in the park today, came across a tree, and me being me I thought "Hey lets try climbing this thing for fun." But something strange struck me, the tree was completely devoid, as in ...
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3answers
227 views

Where does crop biomass come from?

Each year, large volumes of crop are harvested from fields. Where does this biomass get replenished from?
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49 views

Is it possible to simulate the effects of high altitudes for plants?

Note- I considered asking this on gardening.stackexchange.com but i believe it is better suited for this site since it deals with more complicated material. As I understand it, certain plants ...
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35 views

Somatic Mutations in meristem tissue in plants

In angiosperm, in which layer of the meristem does a new mitotic mutation occurring has chance to be found in a pollen grain or in an ovule? I also welcome some insights about non-angiosperm plants.
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182 views

Difference between thylakoids and lamellae in a chloroplast?

I'm slightly confused as to the difference between thylakoids and lamellae. My understanding was that thylakoids are 'discs' that are stacked into grana and there is a membrane between the grana ...
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1answer
84 views

Gender and age-specific mutation rate in plants

Background General concept According to Cochran and Harpending (2013), mothers transmits on average a number $x$ of new mutations to their offspring. This number $x$ is independent of the age of the ...
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1answer
60 views

Could an annual plant be genetically modified to be a perennial?

My chives, asparagus, oregano, and rhubarb come back every year like clockwork. Suppose I want my bok choy to join the party - is there an "I'll be seeing you next year!" gene that can be modified to ...
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2answers
163 views

Where do trees get their shape?

Does anyone know any good resources dealing with shapes of trees? For example, pine trees are cone shaped for optimal absorption of sunlight, but lone pine trees growing in isolation (and other ...
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1answer
77 views

How are Raunkiær's plant life forms viewed today?

At the beginning of the 20th century, Raunkiær proposed a typology of plant life-forms based on where they bear their buds, roughly as: cryptophytes: belowground hemicryptophytes: at the surface ...
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1answer
200 views

Scientific name for the union point of a plant stem and root

Is there a word that describes the meeting point of a plants growing stem and its root? Is this the same term for aerial roots above soil level?
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1answer
616 views

Regulation in plants bearing cleistogamous and chasmogamous flowers

In most plants bearing cleistogamous flowers, chasmogamous flowers are also borne by the plants. For example, Viola, Oxalis and Commelina contain both these kinds of flowers.( I am unaware of a ...
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1answer
85 views

Artificial Propagation and it's relation to asexual reproduction

I know that asexual reproduction is also called vegetative reproduction. However I do not understand it's relation to artificial propagation. Is it a technique used for asexual reproduction (the ...
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1answer
45 views

Seed Germination

Is my understand of how seed germination comes to be and what it entails correct? Seed germination: As the seed matures it loses water and enters dormancy (a state in which it’s metabolic processes ...
3
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1answer
33 views

Seed Dormancy and Seed Transportation

My textbook says "As the seed matures it loses water and enter dormancy". I am confused as to whether this happens before the seeds are transported or after, and as to how seeds know to become dormant ...
3
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1answer
419 views

When happens when pollen grains land on the a part other than the stigma of a flower of the same species?

When happens when pollen grains land on the a part other than the stigma of a flower of the same species? Would the pollen be transported to the stigma or would it just sit where it landed and nothing ...
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2answers
615 views

What does dominant generation mean

In my texbook it is written that for non- vascular seedless plants the dominant generation is the gametophyte as the gametophyte generation is larger and longer lived. Is the criteria for dominant ...
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1answer
237 views

Sporophyte and gametophyte

My textbook says that in both groups of seedless plants (vascular plants, non-vascular plants) the gametophyte is a free-living plant, independent of the sporophyte. I don't understand this statement ...
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1answer
51 views

Exotic Cell Shapes

As far as I know, plant cell shapes are a difficult thing to pin down. However plant cells have cell walls and so can be very rigid. However the only plant cells I've seen have been either block ...
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36 views

Root hair formation in Arabidopsis

In arabidopsis, 2 cell types arise in the root epidermis : root hair cells and hairless epidermal cells. The immature epidermal cells that are in contact with 2 underlying cells of root cortex ...
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1answer
937 views

Is there any natural blue rose?

I had recently read an article that the possibility of having natural blue rose is extremely rare because of the absence of delphinidin in most roses. Are all blue roses just a product of ...
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1answer
1k views

How do lilies sense day and night and open and close their flowers?

We have lots of lily flowers inside our garden. Their flowers are open in day and closed in night. How do lilies sense day and night and open and close their flowers?
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2answers
87 views

Plant anatomy, what are these stem like filaments growing under the flower

The picture below shows what I am talking about. Each flower has one and I am just wondering what they are?
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2answers
197 views

A source for leaf architecture of different plant species/genus?

I'm currently working on extracting some features of the leaf architecture based on their images (like L:W ratio, laminar shape, ...). I use the Manual of Leaf Architecture as the reference. It is ...
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1answer
335 views

How do pineapples and lemongrass grow?

You can't plant the leaves, you can't plant the fruit, but, if you plant the part where leaves and fruit meet you will grow a whole pineapple plant. The part of the pineapple where the leaves meet ...
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0answers
58 views

Why do conker flowers grow upwards?

Most trees I know that have their flowers in groups hang these groups down. I noticed, however, that conker flowers grow upwards! I guess that growing against gravity requires special effort, so ...
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2answers
379 views

Why do many fruit trees have five-petaled flowers?

Peach, pear, apple, cherry, and many other fruit trees seem to have flowers comprised of five petals. Assuming there is no evolutionary advantage to confusing students of trees, is there a plausible ...
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1k views

What chemicals and structures control the *direction* of plant growth in leaves, stems and roots?

If you want a specific plant, let's say the snap peas I am growing that I bought at Agway. I noticed that they grow towards the light source through the nearby window. Also I think roots work the same ...
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139 views

Plants without bacteria? is it theoretically possible?

I know from school, that all live on the Earth need bacteria as low-level "machines" that break down/extract/convert/produce chemical elements and combinations, other high-level organisms needed. But ...
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1answer
68 views

Does a plant have to be alive for its roots to prevent erosion?

One argument often given in favour of saving current and planting additional plants/saplings is the roots hold soil together and prevent soil erosion. Unlike plants that may be uprooted, a large ...
8
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1answer
111 views

Why can't we breed watermelons without any remaining seeds in the flesh?

Watermelon is just starting to come in season in the northeastern U.S., and having a seedless watermelon is convenient. The only downside is, the "seedless" almost always still have the immature, ...
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148 views

Is it possible to grow any kind of plant soilless (hydroponics)?

Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture and is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, without soil. [wikipedia] My question is if is it possible to grow any kind of ...
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158 views

Why are trichomes important for both the roots and shoots of plants?

In what ways are trichomes vital to the plant? Why have them on the plant shoots as well?
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2answers
131 views

Why do cucurbits produce so much fluid when their stems are cut?

When carrying out some germination tests on species in the Cucurbitaceae, I notice that young plants of this family produce a lot of clear fluid when they are dissected. Most plants I dissect do not ...
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1answer
2k views

How can a monocot get so massive?

Some monocots (such as palms) are impressively thick and massive, yet botanists maintain that they don't have secondary growth. Why do botanists say this? How can it get so big without secondary ...