Study of the normal functioning of plants and plant cells

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1answer
272 views

What allows Valonia ventricosa cells to get so big?

Valonia ventricosa are single celled algae that range between one and few centimeters. In rare cases they can reach sizes exceeding 5cm. They range from grass green, to dark green, and some are even a ...
4
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0answers
24 views

Why would a venus fly traps mouth that's still “chewing” die?

A venus fly trap produces leaves that act like traps for insects. A trapped insect is digested over several days. The trap then opens again to catch another insect. These traps regularly die off. ...
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0answers
7 views

what is the effect of temperature and carbondioxide on the opening and closing of stomata?

I am teaching biology in an academy. The question which I had asked above had been raised by on of my students. I tried my level best to search out the answer to this question but I could not find the ...
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2answers
25 views

How do plants get carbon?

How do plants get carbon? From air or soil? How is it different for aquatic plants and algae? According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soil_organic_matter soil has 3.3 times the size of the ...
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0answers
11 views

Nicotine and plants [duplicate]

I hear that nicotine, produced by Nicotiana tabacum, is poisonous to the plant itself, which is why it accumulates the nicotine in the central cell vacuole. If so, why is nicotine produced in the ...
13
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1answer
1k views

How does a tree trunk sprout and grow after being cut?

After I cut trees into logs and remove the branches in winter, they start growing. They sprout out and grow completely normal looking stems and leaves and maintain them all summer. The sprouts mostly ...
8
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1answer
16k views

What factors affect the rate of transpiration in plant leaves?

I'm trying to get my head around factors which affect transpiration in leaves. For example, how would applying petroleum jelly to the surface of plant leaves affect their rate of transpiration? I ...
12
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1answer
137 views

What is the biological age of grafted plants?

Suppose you graft a piece of an existing 'old' plant. Will it continue to grow having the same biological age as its parent? I.e., would it die at the same time as its parent? Or would the process of ...
2
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3answers
97 views

What is the difference between meristem and bud?

Keep reading both terms quite frequently while studying plant physiology. I did some research trying to establish their differences and I learnt that meristems are undifferentiated cells that can ...
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1answer
67 views

Can plants feel pain? [closed]

I was wondering whether plants could feel pain, for example, does grass feel pain when you mow the lawn? Or do the plants and trees that grow vegetables and fruits feel pain when you harvest them? ...
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1answer
18 views

RNAi in nematode resistant plants

Background : Certain plants have been genetically engineered to have sense-antisense gene of a parasitic nematode. The dsRNA produced by the plant then inactivates the mRNA produced in the nematode, ...
3
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1answer
56 views

Where is ATP used in Phosphorylation?

In the section describing the Calvin Cycle, under the subheading "Reduction", my textbook states that: The steps involve utilisation of 2 molecules of ATP for Phosphorylation... I could not get ...
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1answer
30 views

Do herbaceous plants have woody parts? [closed]

Do herbaceous plants, especially perennial plants have woody parts, like woody stem?
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12 views

Do epidermal differentiated cells release cutin, like guard cells?

Cutin is released by epidermal cells. Do epidermal differentiated cells like guard cells or trichomes or root hairs also release cutin? Many thanks.
1
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1answer
43 views

Can roots have cuticle, especially aerial roots?

In my school biology book, it is written that cuticle covers the epidermal cells in aerial parts of plants and root epidermis doesn't have cuticle. My question is that whether aerial roots, in plants ...
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0answers
38 views

How to measure the biomass of hydroponic plants in netpot/rockwool DWC system?

I'm doing an experiment with 4 kale plants, each in their own small deep water culture (DWC) system. Each plant was transplanted in rockwool with netpots and clay pebbles. But I need to periodically ...
23
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1answer
3k views

What is it that creates that wonderful smell after a fresh rain?

I've heard that the wonderful smell of a fresh rain is actually chemicals released from the trees and grass and other plants. What is the process that allows these chemicals to be released? What ...
3
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1answer
21 views

Accuracy of best plant growth models?

Given a plant $P$, predict its height $H$ at time $t$ since planting given some environmental variables $E_1, \dots, E_n$. How accurate are the state-of-the-art models for such thing? What data is ...
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0answers
93 views

Measuring a plant's electric activity any instructions where to place electrodes?

I would like to measure a plant's electric activity / voltage, I've looked online to find out where to place the electrodes and what type of electrodes to use but they seem to very wildly. Any ideas? ...
4
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2answers
93 views

Is the water transpired by plants pure H₂O, or does it contain trace minerals?

I'm considering the idea of drinking water that I trap from what is transpired by trees. Interestingly, is this water a fairly (or maybe even extraordinarily) pure form of H₂O, a remarkably pure ...
4
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2answers
163 views

How is photosynthesis observed?

How is photosynthesis observed? Say I have plants A and B, and I want to find how fast they are able to turn carbon dioxide into oxygen. How would I experiment this? Say I have one plant A, which ...
4
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2answers
114 views

Can carnivores survive on a (processed) vegetarian diet? Why or why not?

There are many differences in for example the digestive system between carnivores, herbivores and omnivores. It seems that in certain kinds of species adaptability with respect to diet is possible. ...
6
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2answers
88 views

Can plants live forever? [duplicate]

I know that some plants die for old age like a lettuce. But there are trees like Baobabs or larger Ficus in the tropics of whom we don't know their age. And trees like spruce reaching 9950 years old, ...
4
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1answer
116 views

Which are mobile and immobile elements in plants?

I am confused with this element or nutrient classification in the plants, since some authors set elements like $\ce{S}$ and $\ce{Ni}$ as mobile and other as immobile elements (Citation 1, 2, 3, 4, 5). ...
2
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2answers
67 views

How do roots obtain nutrition?

I have a city garden (see picture below) and yesterday I was nurturing it and I pulled up a small plant. I saw its root system and laid it in the sun to dry a bit and then scraped of the rest of the ...
6
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1answer
67 views

Viruses selected by evolution

First let me apologize in advance for I know almost nothing about biology. I had a conversation today with a family member who is a bio-computer-scientist and he talked to me about what his colleagues ...
3
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2answers
56 views

Determining how much energy a plant takes in?

I asked a question on WorldBuilding.SE, "Are diamond berries possible?". This led to asking a question on Chemistry.SE about the amount of energy required to burn a 1 ct. diamond (−6.527kJ). The ...
6
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1answer
42 views

How did the introduction of artificial light changed the life cycle of a plant?

Plants in urbanized areas are constantly exposed to artificial light after sunset. In their natural habitat there is a more distinct day and night cycle. Since light is an important factor in a plant ...
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0answers
23 views

Book-recommendation: plant biophysics [closed]

I'm a physicist by training am looking to learn more about the biophysics of plants. Can you give me your recommendation of good resources on plant biophysics? Books are preferred.
3
votes
1answer
165 views

Why are there more stomatal openings on the lower surface of a dicot leaf?

This causes more transpiration to occur from lower leaf surface. What's the exact reason for why are there more stomatal openings on the lower surface of a dicot leaf?
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29 views

Solidification of coconut water

At first, the coconut is filled with liquid endosperm. Later when it ripens, the outer layers form brown fibrous covering, and the inner solid layer turns brown and hardens. Within that, a white layer ...
2
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1answer
51 views

Which sources can I use to study botany and horticulture?

I refer with this question to those among you who have a strong background and work in fields like: botanics, horticulture, dendrology, etc. I would like to start building a solid preparation, both ...
2
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1answer
58 views

About validation process of phenological study

I have recently done a phenological study using remote sensing techniques. Now I need to validate my results and my methods, that is, to determine if the phenology estimated from remote sensing is ...
4
votes
2answers
294 views

What determines the autumn leaf color?

It is autumn out there. Green, brown, red, yellow, and mixed-colored leaves drop from the trees to the ground. What determines the colors of the leaves? Wikipedia tells me Leaf senescence is the ...
5
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1answer
62 views

How does CO₂ concentration affect photosynthesis?

I have heard the theory that with the increase of CO2 in the air, the speed of the photosynthesis would increase, thereby limiting the increase of CO2 levels. What is currently the rate limiting ...
3
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0answers
79 views

What metabolic processes do dormant and ungerminated seeds carry out?

What metabolic processes does a dormant embryo in a seed carry out? Seeds will not germinate, either because of a lack of favourable conditions, seed hibernation, or because of a genetically ...
7
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2answers
1k views

What chemicals and structures control the *direction* of plant growth in leaves, stems and roots?

If you want a specific plant, let's say the snap peas I am growing that I bought at Agway. I noticed that they grow towards the light source through the nearby window. Also I think roots work the same ...
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0answers
26 views

Why is translocation of food in the phloem still a debate?

I currently take tertiary-high school biology and I am taught that translocation of food in the phloem occurs by the pressure flow hypothesis. I would like to ask why it is still a hypothesis, and ...
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32 views

Alder Tree Root Nodule Origins?

I recently found out that alder trees have root nodules which contain nitrogen-fixing bacteria and that alders are primary colonizers in primary succession. That leads me to this question: since there ...
3
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0answers
42 views

How many cells are there in the apical meristematic tissue?

How many cells are there in the apical meristematic tissue? Looking at this picture... , I would tend to think that there are few hundreds cells in the meristem tissue. But I guess this is a ...
6
votes
1answer
99 views

Why is it harder to sequence plant genomes than animal genomes?

Plants seem to be less complex organisms than animals, but despite that there are less plant genomes sequenced. Is that because plant genomes are more complex, for example in terms of regulatory ...
31
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4answers
5k views

Do plants produce any heat?

Many plants (e.g. roses, palms) can be protected from frost during the winter if shielded with an appropriate coat that can be bought in garden shops. Do plants produce any heat that can be kept ...
10
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3answers
160 views

Is there a fundamental reason that plants cannot fix their own nitrogen?

Plants must have nitrogen to grow. According to the answer to this question, there are no plants can fix their own nitrogen (without the help of bacteria). Plants get their nitrogen in the form of ...
16
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2answers
850 views

Do plant-animal cross races exist?

Plants and animals have the following distinct properties: Plants live from solar energy by photosynthesis, they use solar energy to make sugar and oxygen out of carbon dioxide, which gives them ...
4
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1answer
3k views

Why did the sensitive plant (Mimosa pudica) evolve its leaf-closing mechanism?

Why did the sensitive plant, Mimosa pudica, evolve its leaf closing mechanism? Does it help in a heavy storm? Does it scare off whatever animals might think it a good meal?
2
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1answer
53 views

Is Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) isohydric or anisohydric species?

Question from a thesis defense list ask me this. But I can't find the exact answer on the internet or in books. In my thesis, I described isohydric plants, for example maize, lupin, pea, poplar. This ...
3
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0answers
63 views

What's the (or some of the) minimum(s) amount of atmospheric carbon dioxide needed by plants?

We currently have a problem of increasing CO2 in the atmosphere. But assuming we find a way to carbon sink it, what is the minimum CO2 we need to leave in the atmosphere to provide a source for ...
2
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0answers
38 views

why plants cannot use atmospheric nitrogen? [duplicate]

Earth's atmosphere constitutes 78% of Nitrogen, then why do plants need to absorb Nitrogen from the soil. Why couldn't it possible for them to absorb the atmospheric Nitrogen like they do in the case ...
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0answers
66 views

What are the white spots?

What are these white spots? It's like Braille writing or something. How is the appearance encoded in the plant? (which I think is a Pine, though I am not sure).
5
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1answer
43 views

Total dark deprivation at day-neutral plants

First of all, I am not a biologist. Almost for a week, a question has come to my mind: "Is it harmful ceaselessly exposing a plant to light?" (I mean with natural & artificial light with ...