Study of the normal functioning of plants and plant cells

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Mechanism by which water flows through xylem

I was doing a Cambridge iGCSE past paper when I came across the question: Describe the mechanism by which water flows through the xylem I thought the correct answer would revolve around the ...
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135 views

What's the (or some of the) minimum(s) amount of atmospheric carbon dioxide needed by plants?

We currently have a problem of increasing CO2 in the atmosphere. But assuming we find a way to carbon sink it, what is the minimum CO2 we need to leave in the atmosphere to provide a source for ...
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Does a plant have to have leaves to produce fruit?

Is it possible that a plant can still produce fruit, even though it may not have leaves? Are there any plant species that can produce fruit without leaves?
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Is Valerian diuretic or antidiuretic

Hello i wanted to take valerian to calm me down on stress situations, and also using it as an antidiuretic, but i have seen forums where people say it acts as an diuretic, and others where they said ...
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50 views

Do flowers transpire?

I have googled this out but no where found a satisfactory answer. The definition of transpiration states that it is the evaporative loss of water from the aerial surfaces of the plant but I am really ...
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32 views

How can I estimate the CO₂ uptake of a plant?

I would like to make an estimation of the CO2 uptake of plants I cultivate, including, lettuce and aromatic herbs, such as thyme, basil, rosemary. What I want is to end up with a rough indicator for ...
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76 views

Alder Tree Root Nodule Origins?

I recently found out that alder trees have root nodules which contain nitrogen-fixing bacteria and that alders are primary colonizers in primary succession. That leads me to this question: since there ...
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27 views

what is the effect of temperature and carbondioxide on the opening and closing of stomata?

I am teaching biology in an academy. The question which I had asked above had been raised by on of my students. I tried my level best to search out the answer to this question but I could not find the ...
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48 views

How to measure the biomass of hydroponic plants in netpot/rockwool DWC system?

I'm doing an experiment with 4 kale plants, each in their own small deep water culture (DWC) system. Each plant was transplanted in rockwool with netpots and clay pebbles. But I need to periodically ...
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94 views

Why do fruits have to ripen?

It seems like most fruits that we consume undergo some sort of ripening process either before or after they are picked from the vine, tree, etc. I understand that sugars are released during the ...
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Where do plants obtain the metal ions needed for biological processes?

Enzymes employ metal ions (e.g. Mg, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) for catalysing certain reactions. Let's consider planting a seed. Where will it obtain these metal ions from? Just from water?
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Explain a transpiration graph

The solution is A, but I think both A and C are correct. For choice C, stomata that protected by hairs will have a greater amount of water vapour around them, hence lower water potential gradient. ...
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49 views

Photosynthesis and its subtopics [closed]

Which of the following statements about photosynthesis is true? a. Photosynthesis is an energy consuming process b. The light-dependent reactions produce the energy-rich compounds that are used up ...
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How does an increase in CO2 concentration affect Photosynthesis and Transpiration

I noticed a strange thing in my book. At one place it says that an increase in CO$_2$ concentration in the outside air decreases the rate of transpiration but at the other place it says that an ...
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21 views

What is the genetic difference between two cone branches?

As we can see on this larch, male and female cones are sometimes directed to grow on the opposite side of the branch. We were told in school that this mechanism works against self-fertilization. Also ...
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11 views

What are the theoretical and actual (measured) minimum water potentials in plants?

I'm a plant physiology researcher, but water potentials are not really my thing, so I don't have a great grasp on the literature. I'm dealing with water potential data right now though, and it seems ...
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Do trees have genes for stopping the grow?

Do trees have genetically encoded to stop growing at some height, to keep dividing the cells only to a certain amount, or to pump nutritions only till it's advantageous because they've already ...
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What tell a plant to have one/a lot of flower(s)? [closed]

some plants just have one flower and some have more. This is the question. please simply tell me how? which genes or pathways control this in various plants?
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How can plants be grown in hydroponics, and yet not handle too much water in soil?

It's pretty much common knowledge that plants planted in pots or soil that doesn't have good drainage can't be watered too much, or they'll "drown". Regardless of what actually happens, experience ...
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406 views

How is photosynthesis observed?

How is photosynthesis observed? Say I have plants A and B, and I want to find how fast they are able to turn carbon dioxide into oxygen. How would I experiment this? Say I have one plant A, which ...
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What is a rough estimate of CO₂ saturation for high-yield or high growth rate plants?

Naturally, plants have individual photosynthesis capacities, but it would still be interesting to get a general picture of CO2 saturation levels for some common cultures. Where lies the optimal yield, ...
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282 views

How does Pothos grow in only water?

The popular potted plant, Pothos aureus (or Epipremnum aureum) is happy to grow in a jar, with only water, for years. How is this possible when other plants need at least Nitrogen, Phosphorus and ...
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Fe(II) and Fe(III) transport from rhizosphere across plasma membrane

Does the graminaceous plants have passive uptake of Fe(II) via a passive Fe(II)-transporter enzyme? Or it it only dicots and non-graminaceous plants that have the Fe(II)-transporter enzyme? Also, can ...
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49 views

Rosemary room temperature at winter

I consistently read in non-scientific resources that I have to put my rosemary to low temperature (about 10°C) in winter (unless I don't want it to freeze). I googled, but I fail to find a scientific ...
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68 views

Total dark deprivation at day-neutral plants

First of all, I am not a biologist. Almost for a week, a question has come to my mind: "Is it harmful ceaselessly exposing a plant to light?" (I mean with natural & artificial light with ...
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1answer
76 views

Which sources can I use to study botany and horticulture?

I refer with this question to those among you who have a strong background and work in fields like: botanics, horticulture, dendrology, etc. I would like to start building a solid preparation, both ...
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421 views

How do roots obtain nutrition?

I have a city garden (see picture below) and yesterday I was nurturing it and I pulled up a small plant. I saw its root system and laid it in the sun to dry a bit and then scraped of the rest of the ...
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Which are mobile and immobile elements in plants?

I am confused with this element or nutrient classification in the plants, since some authors set elements like $\ce{S}$ and $\ce{Ni}$ as mobile and other as immobile elements (Citation 1, 2, 3, 4, 5). ...
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Do lunar rhythms have really impact on plant growth?

It is commonly known that lunar rhythms have influence on plant growth, and there are even lunar calendars to know when planting, pruning, transplanting, harvesting, etc. I know that the lunar cycles ...
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55 views

Reason for aquatic plant roots

My question is about why aquatic plants have roots. At first they seem a bit superfluous to me because leaves of the plants could just absorb nutrients directly from the water thereby skipping a need ...
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23 views

Ions in Stomatal Opening Mechanism

When a stoma’s guard cells try to swell and open the stomata, they actively pump out protons outside of the cell. This causes a membrane potential, where the inside of the cell is negative with ...
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30 views

Why do the vines change their spinning direction?

Look at the vines holding onto the lattice. The "vine springs" change their spinning direction in the middle. Why? And how do they achieve this? (By the way, what's the name for this plant? Is is ...
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Does anyone know the explanation for branches with different flower colors (see picture)?

As you can see in the below picture, there's a branch with white-colored flowers, while the rest of the tree has pink flowers. I googled a number of questions but it is a bit complicated to ...
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Why are amides transported via xylem vessels? Why not phloem?

There is a statement in my textbook: "since amides contain more nitrogen than amino acids, they are transported to other parts of plants via xylem vessels" I wanted to know why the book ...
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Moss Transportation System

In my biology textbook, it says that mosses are avasculer and do not have xylem like spermatophytes. So by what means do mosses transport nutrients ?
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What factors affect the rate of transpiration in plant leaves?

I'm trying to get my head around factors which affect transpiration in leaves. For example, how would applying petroleum jelly to the surface of plant leaves affect their rate of transpiration? I ...
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1answer
32 views

Plasmolysis vs Flaccidity in cells

When is a cell said to be flaccid and when is it called plasmolysed? So far I found that there is a specific relation to osmosis.
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Are there any (chemical) processes occuring inside a seed while it's in a dormant state?

If a seed were in a glass jar without a chance of germination, are there any (chemical) processes occurring inside the seed while it sits there? My intuition tells me no since my understanding of ...
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Can plant roots absorb dissolved oxygen from water, or do they require actual bubbles in the water?

Plant roots generally require some exposure to air. Deep water culture is a form of hydroponics where plants' roots are left to soak in water. To keep the roots from "suffocating", most online ...
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How does a plant grow before photosynthesis is possible?

During photosynthesis, a plant translates CO2, water and light into O2. I assume the carbon C is further used for the growing process. I wonder how the plant grows before the time where photosynthesis ...
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Is it possible and how could it possible for plant to survive in naked space

I heard that there are fungi could survive on space station in the naked space. I want to know if any plant could be able to do the same How many limitation of plant differ from fungi And could it ...
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Plant symbiosis, alternative regulation pathways to AON and miRNA399?

I am currently studying systemic repression of both arbuscular mycorrhizae and nitrogen fixing bacteria in legumes. I know of the AON pathway (which works through CLE and NARK). I also know of ...
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Phototropism or Hydrotropism is a more important factor for trees beside the lakes growing bending to the water?

I see a lot trees beside the lakes are growing bending to the water and I wonder why. After reading this I think it might be a combined effects by: Phototropism: the lake works as a mirror and ...
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105 views

Could an annual plant be genetically modified to be a perennial?

My chives, asparagus, oregano, and rhubarb come back every year like clockwork. Suppose I want my bok choy to join the party - is there an "I'll be seeing you next year!" gene that can be modified to ...
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Do any plants grow leaves beneath the ground?

We have a pretty common California weed in our yard. When we dig in the ground, we often find small ones there, with green leaves! It's as if they form green leaves before they come to the surface. ...
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1answer
147 views

Why does Citric Acid occur in Citrus fruits?

Why is there so much citric acid in citrus fruits? And how did it evolve i.e. what did it come from? Is it a by-product of the ripening process? Why have citrus fruit evolved a particularly high ...
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1k views

Do immature fruits perform photosynthesis?

Most immature fruits are green: peppers, pine cones, plums, lots of them. I want to know if the green is from chlorophyll in the cells. Do the fruit cells perform photosynthesis? When you cover a ...
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Current scientific theories for evolution of Cucurbita

I'm attempting to find research on scientific theories surrounding the evolution of certain plants, and am unable to find any footing with respect to a certain genus. In this case, I am researching ...
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What is the effect of a pure-oxygen environment on a plant?

Just read What's the effect of oxygen deficit on plants? ; and wondered whether the opposite would have any effect on a plant. That is to say, if a potted plant were placed under a bell-jar and ...
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What happens if we continuously stimulate a mimosa plant?

I know there is some mechanism in humans by which we start to ignore a certain stimuli if it persists for a long time (e.g., we don't feel our shoes all the time !). Can the same thing happen in ...