Biopolymers consisting of amino acids that fold into 3D shapes and perform a large number of functions in living organisms.

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What is the biding site code recognized by the parts of the spliceosome

Another question about another Youtube video. At 0:50, the splicing process begins to remove the non-coding section of the DNA (intron), so the different parts of the spliceosome attach to the borders ...
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2answers
39 views

What are the naming conventions for mutations of proteins?

I have been reading about Maltose Binding Proteins. Mutant forms of the molecule seem to be named MalE_ where the _ represents a number, for example MalE36 or MalE50. Please can someone explain the ...
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2answers
45 views

pI and pH relationship in context of ion exchange protein purification

I am confused about relationship between isoelectric point and pH in context of ion exchange protein purification. Why we cannot use this method for protein with pI below 7? Thank you very much for ...
2
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1answer
38 views

Does Sirtuin protein family Sir2 work in low-calorie diet mostly?

I am reading about the protein family in relation to the prolongation of cell life. It is known that Sirtuins have been implicated in influencing a wide range of cellular processes like ageing, ...
2
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1answer
73 views

How to bind antibodies to study their properties?

I want to experimentally look at the behavior of antibodies. To do so, I need to be able to bind these antibodies to a substrate. Does anybody know of a good substrate to use that antibodies bind to? ...
2
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1answer
109 views

How long does a tan last?

How long do melanocytes and melanosomes continue to protect DNA after UV exposure? Basically, if skin is tanned, then over the next month it is shed, will melanocytes continue to produce high levels ...
2
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1answer
77 views

Why glycoproteins are better than non-glycoproteins in fulfilling biological tasks?

I have just an intuition that the carbohydrate part of glycoproteins help them to fulfil those tasks like in plasma membranes. You can also get many more receptors if you can use carbohydrates too. ...
2
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1answer
206 views

Are Bovine serum albumin, Avidin, Ficoll-70 and Dextran-70 positively charged or negatively charged? [closed]

Bovine serum albumin, Avidin, Ficoll-70 and Dextran-70,are they positively charged or negatively charged ? And which other solvents can be used as a substitute to water for preparing solutions in each ...
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1answer
46 views

Pectinase Enzyme Assay

I am working on pectinase enzyme assay. I incubated 900 ul of substrate for 10 minutes in the water bath, followed by adding 2ml of DNSA reagent, then 100ul of enzyme extract added finally i read the ...
2
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1answer
29 views

Protein Conformation Modeling

I'm interested in learning about computational modeling in biophysics. I have heard some amount about people modeling proteins as a network of ideal springs to examine things like conformation ...
2
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1answer
27 views

Evolutionary rationale behind migration proteins

Tumor cells are able to migrate due to specific migration proteins. What is their evolutionary origin? Or are they simply deregulated?
2
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1answer
38 views

Epistasis when interacting loci are codons within a single gene

There is epistasis when the effect on the phenotype of one gene is influenced by one or more other genes (called modifiers). Is there a similar concept when the effect on the phenotype of one site ...
2
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3answers
106 views

Bacterial cell lysis buffer used in proteomics procedures

What kinds of detergent-free bacterial lysis buffers exist? The proteins we're extracting will be later analyzed by LC-MS/MS, and we're looking for a lysis buffer that won't interfere with this ...
2
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1answer
55 views

PTMs of proteins via mass spec?

I understand that mass spec is widely used to study PTMs like glycosylation of proteins, but how can mass spec determine correct PTM structure of say glycosylation if two glycan structures have the ...
2
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1answer
357 views

Where to put the gene after eukaryotic promoter for best expression levels?

As far as I know there is an optimum distance between a promoter and the gene for the best expression levels. What is that distance for common promoters like CMV, SV40? If you have a first hand ...
2
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1answer
28 views

The use of proteins in memory creation

I have very limited knowledge of how the human memory works as I think, at this time, most people do. However, I have been reading and some articles which say, and I quote the article just linked ...
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0answers
43 views

Circular mRNA to produce long proteins

Ribosomes can read mRNA and produce proteins, if we somehow make a circular mRNA for the ribosome to bind onto, it will make infinitely long "proteins", (since ribosomes can make very big proteins, I ...
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0answers
41 views

Removal of the Initial Methionine in Venus for FRET

I'm working on building some FRET reporters. In addition to a cleavage site (of varying composition from 15-18AA), a 1 AA linker, I'm using Venus and Cerulean. Initially I was worried that 18AA ...
2
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1answer
45 views

How do you differentiate between SR protein and SR-like protein?

What are the criteria that the researchers use to choose whether a protein is an SR protein or and SR-like protein?
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0answers
41 views

Which mass spectrometry database search algorithms include the fragment mass accuracy in the calculation of protein scores?

E.g. in a MASCOT search, the accuracy of the fragment ions in a ms/ms spectrum does not have any influence on the scores of identified proteins (unless the fragment ions are out of the set ms/ms ...
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0answers
47 views

How to use mechanical microstrainer to extract tissue proteins from human?

Background: There are many methods to extract proteins form human tissues out there. The majority of them use an extraction buffer containing variable concentrations of detergents and protease ...
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0answers
38 views

Endocannabinoid Transporters - which ones are Likely to Exist and what is the Evidence for their Respective Existence?

Endocananbinoid = Endogenous Cannabinoid or CB1 and CB2 ligands. I'm asking which endocannabinoid transporters exist and could the one answering show all the evidence for the existence of the ...
2
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0answers
196 views

What specifically allows alpha-complementation in beta-galactosidase?

I'm familiar with the use of alpha-complementation of beta-galactosidase with the pUC alpha-peptide and the M15 lacZ gene product, and would like to hypothetically apply alpha-complementation in other ...
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0answers
58 views

Are there examples of PTMs that add different chemical groups (and mass) to different amino acids?

I'm talking about this type of post-translational modifications. What I'm interested in is not whether some modifications can only occur on specific amino acids (that's clear), but if the nomenclature ...
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2answers
289 views

How are proteins formed?

Somewhere, I have read that we need to consume proteins to make amino acids to make new proteins. What does it suggest? How do we make proteins from proteins?
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4answers
78 views

Which point mutations in proteins are OK, and which cause significant change?

I heard that some point mutations in proteins are OK, like from alanine to glycine (I'm not sure, it's just an example), some will change the protein significantly. I want to understand deeper but ...
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2answers
75 views

Conserved proteins are non immunogenic

I read that proteins that have been highly conserved are non-immunogenic. Why is it so ? What is the special thing that makes it non immunogenic(antibodies against them are hard to make) ?
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1answer
117 views

What type of mutation causes Progeria?

I'm doing my High School biology final on Progeria, and am wondering what type of mutation causes this disease. I know that the LMNA gene codes for the "prelamin A" protein, and that protein contains ...
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2answers
292 views

PEG-silane treatment: why incubate for 18 hours at 60 degrees Celsius?

I am conducting a biochemistry-related experiment and I have been unable to understand a step which is commonly performed. My aim in this step is to apply a PEG (Polyethylene glycol) silane layer. ...
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1answer
186 views

Which concentration of BSA is recommended for dynamic light scattering experiments?

What is the recommended concentration of BSA to be mixed with water so as to prepare a very dilute solution in order to clearly study the intensity-intensity correlation with single scattering ? I ...
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1answer
14 views

What does the term 'modified residue position' in phosphorylation mean?

Does it mean the position of the amino acid in the protein sequence, or something else? For example, I came across the phrase "S 368 phosphoryation" where S is the modified residue and 368 is the ...
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1answer
27 views

How are cyclic hormones characterized?

I have a question regarding the description of a subset of peptide hormones, called cyclic hormones. Two examples of cyclic hormones would be somatostatin and melanin-concentrating hormones. I know ...
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1answer
29 views

Staphylococcus AG structure?

I found this statement in my study materials in the section of Staphylococcus The AG structure: protein AG (species specific); polysaccharide AG (serotype specific). I know what is ...
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1answer
138 views

Codon alignment via Python? [closed]

I have pairs of coding DNA sequences which I wish to perform pairwise codon alignments via Python, I have "half completed" the process. So far.. I retrive pairs of orthologous DNA sequences from ...
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1answer
609 views

What is the difference between average and monoisotopic mass calculations of peptides?

I often have to calculate the mass of peptide sequences using calculators such as here. I have the option of calculating the average and monoisotopic mass, but what is the difference?
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21 views

Deduce length order of 4 decapeptides based on the Ramachandran plot

I have stumbled upon the following past exam question: 4 decapeptides A, B, C, D, made only of glycine residues, have different conformations, and the phi and psi angles of individual peptides ...
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1answer
51 views

How to parse SCOP parseable files PDB residue identifiers?

I am trying to parse the SCOP parseable files, specifically dir.des.scop.txt ver 1.75. But, I have been facing problems with the PDB residue identifiers in the file. This is a tab limited file and the ...
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1answer
524 views
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60 views

Topology of protein

The domain structure of protein Z, which is composed of 180 amino acids, is shown in the upper part of the figure below. Protein Z is palmitoylated at a cysteine residue (the third amino acid) ...
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1answer
168 views

What are the differences between HPRD and BIOGRID databases?

What are the differences between HPRD and BIOGRID protein-protein interactions databases? What are their purposes? Why do we need two different databases? How is data collected into each one? How ...
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1answer
48 views

Dimethyltryptamine binding site on Sigma 1 type opioid receptor?

I asked this question Dimethyltryptamine and Sigma 1-type opioid receptor interaction but it seems that I didn't express myself well. I was looking for the place on Sigma 1 type opioid receptor where ...
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1answer
92 views

What are the characteristics of a promising drug target?

When researchers are looking to start developing a drug, what characteristics do they look for in the potential proteins (assuming they already have good quality structural models)?
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1answer
12 views

can a bacterial protease inhibitor cocktail be used for Western Blotting involving HUVEC cells and HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells?

Dear fellow biochemists, I need some advice on Western Blotting, more specifically the use of certain protease inhibitors with the RIPA cell lysis buffer and protease inhibitor cocktail. A Millipore ...
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1answer
56 views

What I can do in order to improve the folding of the protein?

I am struggling with the expression of the certain protein. It seems that it is not properly folded and thus, it is not active. I tried to express it at the lower temperature and for the longer time, ...
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1answer
37 views

conservation of C-peptide sequence in the guinea pig

Where can I compare the C-peptide sequence of guinea pig with human or mouse? I am also interested in finding whether the guinea pig has insulin 1 and 2 to know whether I could use an anti-C-peptide 1 ...
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1answer
25 views

fibrinogens and fibrins - are they the same molecule?

Some proteins are "activated", like fibrinogens; they are turned into fibrins by thrombins, and then the fibrins can aid in blood clotting. Are fibrinogens and fibrins the same molecule, just in ...
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1answer
30 views

Vesicular and non vesicular transport

I have to classify them either as transported in vesicles or without vesicles. What I think - Non-vesicular 2.vesicular 3.vesicular 4.vesicular 5.non-vesicular 6.vesicular 7.vesicular ...
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1answer
37 views

Removing Sugars Bound to a Protein

I recently purchased some Maltose Binding Protein and as the name suggests this protein binds to maltose. The problem I have is the protein arrive with maltose bound. I know this through native mass ...
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1answer
46 views

Protein Structure Statistics [closed]

Could you show me references of any works you know of where, 1- they take all the known protein structure data (that is the coordinate data of all the proteins in PDB database lets say or elsewhere) ...
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1answer
152 views

How do proteins get into the blood stream?

So I'm asking this in reference to the injection of insulin, which is commonly done subcutaneously (in the hypodermis, a fatty part of skin). Now I know proteins usually get into the blood when ...