Copying the genome for the purpose of reproduction.

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4answers
118k views

Why is DNA replication performed in the 5' to 3' direction?

DNA replication goes in the 5' to 3' direction because DNA polymerase acts on the 3'-OH of the existing strand for adding free nucleotides. Is there any biochemical reason why all organisms evolved to ...
12
votes
2answers
447 views

Why, specifically, does each generation, on average, improve upon the design of the species rather than degrade it?

In every non-life example I can envision, a copy of a copy is always a degraded or less pure version of the original unless some outside influence acts to correct the copy back toward the ideal ...
12
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2answers
191 views

Are there viruses that affect cells across different species?

I'm not a professional in biology nor a student, but I'm curious about this. To be more specific: why doesn't a plant virus affect animal cells? I suspect that different kinds of cells have different ...
9
votes
1answer
209 views

When do plasmids replicate relative to its host cell cycle?

For plasmids is so much shorter than their host cell's genome (about 1/1000 in my case), it will take only 1/1000 time for it to replicate. With respect to cell cycle, when will that replication ...
9
votes
2answers
709 views

Which bacteria have the highest mutation rate?

From my reading on M. tuberculosis, I know that this organism has a pretty high mutation rate due to uncorrected sloppy replication, which leads to a high rate of development of spontaneous resistance ...
7
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1answer
3k views

Difference in length of Okazaki fragments

The length of Okazaki fragments in the lagging strand is about 100-200 nucleotides in eukaryotes and about 1000-2000 nucleotides in prokaryotes. What (molecular mechanism, enzyme type ) ...
6
votes
1answer
97 views

What regulates the timing of the motion of molecular machines during DNA Replication?

This question is about this video I found on Youtube. I just want to know what is the mechanism which regulates the timing of motion of the parts of these molecular machines. I know that those big ...
5
votes
2answers
110 views

Do somatic cells alter their own nucleotide sequence?

I seem to remember reading that embryonic cells will frequently replicate the section of their genome containing rDNA by splicing in duplicate genes. The cells use this to produce ribosomes at a rate ...
5
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2answers
309 views

How can E. coli proliferate so rapidly?

The E. coli has a genome with approximately 5×106 bp. The main DNA polymerase involved in its chromosome duplication (DNA pol III , the one with highest processivity) can polymerize ~103 nucleotides ...
3
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2answers
783 views

What does this equation about DNA replication mean?

Could someone help me understand this equation please? I found it in a paper which said that it was DNA replication, but why? $\ce{dNTP + dNMP_{n} -> dNMP_{n +1} + PPi}$ I found that dNTP means ...
3
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1answer
428 views

Can replication occur if DNA is methylated?

Can a methylated strand of DNA be replicated without removing methylation? Does it make any difference if the strand is methylated or not (during replication)?
3
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2answers
260 views

DNA polymerase I exonuclease activity

Does DNA polymerase I in bacteria use forward or reverse exonuclease activity to remove RNA primers? One of my books says it uses 5' to 3', but another says it uses 3' to 5' exonuclease activity. ...
3
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1answer
2k views

Telomere shortening during replication

It is widely know that each cell cycle during DNA replication some fraction of the telomeres is lost, and this phenomenon is called the end replication problem. Well this is due to the fact that the ...
3
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1answer
2k views

What happens when cells in your body run out of telomeres?

In my biology book I read about an experiment where the genes encoding telomerase were 'knocked out', but they could still live a normal life and no adverse effects were noticed until the 6th ...
2
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2answers
63 views

Bacteria Replication

I learned this at a lecture, but somehow I have trouble in understanding this. It is said that the bacteria such as E.coli need 20 minutes to divide, but its chromosome require 40 minutes to multiply. ...
2
votes
1answer
7k views

Does DNA replication in 5' to 3' (leading strand) need RNA primase?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27TxKoFU2Nw In the above video it shows that during DNA replication, the lagging strand require RNA primase to add 3' -OH group for further addition of nucleotides. ...
2
votes
1answer
181 views

What is the name of the smallest self-replicating thing?

Some time last year, I found an article on Wikipedia about the smallest something to be able to reproduce. I don't remember exactly what it was, but I am fairly certain that after the initial ...
2
votes
1answer
18 views

Number of Chromatids in G1

I know that in G1, the number of chromosomes is 23 pairs, so 46. I assumed there were 46 chromatids too. Why is the number of chromatids in G1 actually 0, not 46? Thanks.
2
votes
2answers
1k views

How accurate does the alignment of molecules in DNA have to be?

We have learned that the same information is saved in the DNA in the same place. So when DNA splits and then connects again (during reproduction); how does it maintain the integrity of the information?...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

How does a thymidine block halt DNA synthesis?

The best I've been able to find is that there's a feedback mechanism, but what is this feedback, and how does the mechanism work? If it's just that the concentration of thymidine is too high, why won'...
1
vote
2answers
165 views

How does high-fidelity of DNA replication depend on the formation of hydrogen bonds?

Replication has an error rate of less than 1 in 100 million. DNA polymerase forms H-bond with the H-bond acceptor atoms in the minor groove. <-- enhance fidelity here? Binding of the triphosphate ...
1
vote
5answers
125 views

Can your immune system's cells destroy you? (Critical thinking and Fictional sense)

In an imaginary sense, If you alone were replicated into 2 so that there should now be 2 of "you" (meaning you both have the same DNA). Then let's say one of you shrunk to the size of a bacteria, and ...
1
vote
1answer
197 views

Can Mono-Cell or other organism self-replicate?

I have a question regarding how organism replicate them self to create an other organism, We know that in animal reign, we need a male and female that will generate a new being. what I want to know ...
1
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1answer
105 views

In the lysogenic cycle, does the provirus split from the cell's main genetic material for replication?

In a diagram of the lysogenic cycle sent by my instructor in a video, it shows the provirus splitting from the cell's main DNA when the dormancy period ends and the viral DNA is "activated". Is this ...
1
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1answer
142 views

What is the mechanism of labeling a DNA molecule with deuterated water?

I have seen a paper in which deuterated water was used to follow dividing cells. The assumption was that deuterated water will be incorporated into newly synthesized DNA molecules. Is there any direct ...
1
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1answer
186 views

DNA Replication

I just wanted to understand the basic steps behind the replication of the lagging strand of DNA: Have helicase unwind it first DNA Primase lays down RNA primers in fragments, called Okazaki ...
0
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0answers
26 views

DNA replication: in which direction does the DNA polymerase 3 work?

In a couple of sites I have seen, it states that it reads in 3' to 5' direction (upstream) though the daughter strand is made in the 5'-3' direction. How does that work?