The process of biological aging or the state of an organism being biologically old.

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Free Radicals for aging

From my understanding free radicals play a slight role in ageing. In what ways are they so damaging, and can a restricted diet reduce production of free radicals?
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428 views

Could inhibition of progerin formation slow the rate at which a body ages?

According to wikipedia, progerin is activated in senescent cells. The protein itself is known to be the cause of a rare affliction 'progeria' - a disease marked by accelerated aging of the body. This ...
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1answer
206 views

Have any mutations or genetic loci been associated with exceptional longevity in humans?

Individuals that avoid age-related diseases into later life are known as 'exceptional survivors', and have increased longevity compared to their 'controls' (those that were born at a similar time, yet ...
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1answer
99 views

In what ways, if any, does administration of rapamycin *not* mimic calorie restriction?

Numerous sources like this say that rapamycin increases lifespan. And mTOR antagonism appears to be a large part of this (mTOR antagonism also appears to be a large part of calorie restriction's ...
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1answer
79 views

If inhibiting S6 kinase decreases protein translation, then could inhibiting S6 kinase could possibly slow down long-term potentiation in neurons?

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P70S6_kinase... Phosphorylation of S6 induces protein synthesis at the ribosome. P70S6 kinase is in a signaling pathway that includes mTOR (the mammalian ...
5
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1answer
212 views

Why isn't the p16-INK4a gene involved in apoptosis expressed in heart or liver tissues?

New York Times article explains how killing p16-INK4a positive senescent cells can help keep the surrounding cells vigorous. So here's my question: why is p16-INK4a expressed in most cells other than ...
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1answer
129 views

What are the effects of combining rapamycin with dietary restriction?

Are the effects additive or subadditive? In many ways, rapamycin acts like a CR mimetic, but even CR can only go so far.
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0answers
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RHEB senses amino acids in order to recruit mTOR. Do we know if RHEB is more sensitive to some amino acids (like methionine) than other amino acids?

See http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21157483 for the full paper describing the process of how RHEB recruits mTOR. We also discussed this in Matt Kaeberlein's class yesterday and I posed this ...
6
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1answer
368 views

Why are beta-galactosidase proteins overexpressed in senescent cells?

Wikipedia explains that it's a hypothetical hydrolase enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-galactosides into monosaccharides only in senescent cells. I'm just wondering - what causes it to be ...
4
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1answer
1k views

How do caspase proteins kill a cell?

Wikipedia just says... The active effector caspases then proteolytically degrade a host of intracellular proteins to carry out the cell death program. Okay, but what parts of the cell do they ...
5
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1answer
148 views

Does AMP/ATP ratio affect lifespan in vertebrates?

The reference below says that a higher AMP/ATP ratio is associated with lower lifespan in C. elegans. Is this finding also generalizable to vertebrates as well? Reference: Apfeld, J., O’Connor, ...
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318 views

Why does regular exercise increase brain volume?

It has been shown in several studies that regular aerobic exercise increases brain volume in aging humans. The changes were observed in hippocampus and were correlated with dramatic reduction of ...