The process of biological aging or the state of an organism being biologically old.

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Why does hair turn grey or white, and why does it happen later for some?

The question is pretty simple: what is happening molecularly when hair turns grey or white? I would imagine that it is due to the lack of a particular compound. I'm also interested in why some ...
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446 views

Could inhibition of progerin formation slow the rate at which a body ages?

According to wikipedia, progerin is activated in senescent cells. The protein itself is known to be the cause of a rare affliction 'progeria' - a disease marked by accelerated aging of the body. This ...
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228 views

Have any mutations or genetic loci been associated with exceptional longevity in humans?

Individuals that avoid age-related diseases into later life are known as 'exceptional survivors', and have increased longevity compared to their 'controls' (those that were born at a similar time, yet ...
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587 views

Do trees age on a microscopic level?

Most animals age via at least two mechinisms: at a "macroscopic" level, basically wear and tear to the point where (on evolutionary time scales) it's more genetically advantageous to optimize for ...
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569 views

Why do some trees have a life span, while some don't?

I have heard that there is no limit on the growth of trees, but then why do some trees, such as boxelders and poplars, tend to live shorter than redwoods, for example? Some advertisements for improved ...
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Free Radicals for aging

From my understanding free radicals play a slight role in ageing. In what ways are they so damaging, and can a restricted diet reduce production of free radicals?
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80 views

If inhibiting S6 kinase decreases protein translation, then could inhibiting S6 kinase could possibly slow down long-term potentiation in neurons?

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P70S6_kinase... Phosphorylation of S6 induces protein synthesis at the ribosome. P70S6 kinase is in a signaling pathway that includes mTOR (the mammalian ...
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49 views

Do we know if RHEB is more sensitive to some amino acids than other amino acids?

RHEB (Ras homolog enriched in brain) senses amino acid levels in order to recruit mTOR. See this review describing the process of how RHEB recruits mTOR. So does RHEB have differential selectivity ...
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134 views

What are the effects of combining rapamycin with dietary restriction?

Are the effects additive or subadditive? In many ways, rapamycin acts like a CR mimetic, but even CR can only go so far.
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In what ways, if any, does administration of rapamycin *not* mimic calorie restriction?

Numerous sources like this say that rapamycin increases lifespan. And mTOR antagonism appears to be a large part of this (mTOR antagonism also appears to be a large part of calorie restriction's ...
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81 views

Why would we overexpress Sir2 by overexpressing its hypomorph (dSir2-EP2300) in C. elegans?

Can't we just overexpress regular Sir2 in the paper? Rather than overexpress a reduced-function gene? The paper is Burnett C, Valentini S, Cabreiro F, Goss M, Somogyvári M, Piper MD, Hoddinott M, ...
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Why are beta-galactosidase proteins overexpressed in senescent cells?

Wikipedia explains that it's a hypothetical hydrolase enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-galactosides into monosaccharides only in senescent cells. I'm just wondering - what causes it to be ...
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226 views

Why isn't the p16-INK4a gene involved in apoptosis expressed in heart or liver tissues?

New York Times article explains how killing p16-INK4a positive senescent cells can help keep the surrounding cells vigorous. So here's my question: why is p16-INK4a expressed in most cells other than ...
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How do caspase proteins kill a cell?

Wikipedia just says... The active effector caspases then proteolytically degrade a host of intracellular proteins to carry out the cell death program. Okay, but what parts of the cell do they ...
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How does the NAD+/NADH ratio affect lifespan in vertebrates?

Here's the proximate physical implication of the ratio (from the Wikipedia article on NADH). The balance between the oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide is called the ...
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149 views

Does AMP/ATP ratio affect lifespan in vertebrates?

The reference below says that a higher AMP/ATP ratio is associated with lower lifespan in C. elegans. Is this finding also generalizable to vertebrates as well? Reference: Apfeld, J., O’Connor, ...
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Does current evidence support the use of resveratrol as an anti-ageing drug?

A while back there was a lot of noise about resveratrol, a naturally occurring phenol which was touted as a potential anti-aging drug due to its role in regulating the SIRT 1 gene. A number of studies ...
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334 views

Why does regular exercise increase brain volume?

It has been shown in several studies that regular aerobic exercise increases brain volume in aging humans. The changes were observed in hippocampus and were correlated with dramatic reduction of ...
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959 views

Why do we age? or Do we have a theory of senescence?

There seem to be a number of ideas about why we age. Hypotheses include the gradual accumulation of cell metabolic products affecting organism function and the reduction of telomere length during cell ...