The process of biological aging or the state of an organism being biologically old.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (2)

3
votes
2answers
890 views

In practice, do fishes die from old age?

I was watching sea birds eating fishes and wondered if fishes actually died from old age, or if they are all eaten before this can happen? I reckon some big predator fishes must be able to live long ...
3
votes
1answer
170 views

Senescence, immortality and evolution?

Many have heard about the fabled "immortal" jellyfish, Turritopsis dohrnii, which doesn't die from aging (senescence) and can revert the aging process indefinitely. It is rather remarkable that only ...
3
votes
1answer
84 views

How do mosquitoes maintain telomere length?

While the vast majority of eukaryotic organisms maintain their chromosome ends (telomeres) via telomerase, an enzyme system that generates short, tandem repeats on the ends of chromosomes, other ...
3
votes
1answer
496 views

Could inhibition of progerin formation slow the rate at which a body ages?

According to wikipedia, progerin is activated in senescent cells. The protein itself is known to be the cause of a rare affliction 'progeria' - a disease marked by accelerated aging of the body. This ...
3
votes
2answers
311 views

Does the speed of electrical impulses through neurones decrease with age?

From what I read on the NatGeo app, it stated that the speed of the electrical impulses that are sent by a neurone will be approximately 332 kilometers per hour. Will the speed of this electrical ...
3
votes
0answers
91 views

Papers linking telomeres and aging [closed]

I'm currently writing a piece of work about telomeres and aging, and wondered if you could share some good papers you've either read or know of.
3
votes
1answer
82 views

What are senescent cells doing in our bodies? [closed]

I'm reading a paper that mentioned the elimination of senescent cells delays aging. I'd like to receive more information about it. The Baker study published in Nature demonstrates that targeted ...
2
votes
2answers
211 views

How does the telomere repeat sequence vary in Eukaryotes?

Question: How does the telomeric repeating sequence vary in non-vertebrate Eukaryotes? If you know the repeating sequence of a given species I would appreciate hearing it. Background: Telomerase is ...
2
votes
2answers
163 views

Do couples having children later in life act as an evolutionary mechanism?

Ok, this may be just wild nonsense and I have to warn that my knowledge on the subject is limited. I was reading about how in some countries people choose to have children later in life. After that ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

Do Blanding's Turtles die of old age?

I have recently found articles and various claims that turtles (Blanding's turtles as an exact example) could possibly live indefinitely. http://discovermagazine.com/2002/jun/featturtle This is said ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Age-associated neurodegenerative diseases

Age-associated neurodegenerative diseases encompass Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease. What other neurodegenerative diseases could be described as age-associated? Multiple Sclerosis? Brain ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

About modern dating techniques

In a comment to this question, it was said that Radiocarbon dating won't work. For a start the tree needs to be dead, which since you're not using the rings I'm assuming it isn't. Also the atomic ...
2
votes
1answer
78 views

Telomere elongation methods?

What sort of telomere elongation methods are there currently? Would this stop aging? (edit: No, probably) I couldn't turn up anything good on google. I was thinking that maybe you could sequence ...
2
votes
1answer
147 views

What are the effects of combining rapamycin with dietary restriction?

Are the effects additive or subadditive? In many ways, rapamycin acts like a CR mimetic, but even CR can only go so far.
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Why the length of UTR in the genomic sequence of gene X is too much longer than the same region in the corresponding Refseq mRNA sequences?

I'm browsing in the UCSC genome browser and found that the UTRs length of KIAA0040 gene in the genomic sequences is too much longer than the corresponding the Refseq mRNA sequence. In fact, the total ...
2
votes
0answers
47 views

Hydra immortality

Recent research on immortality ha been on an organism named Hydra. I have heard about it being related to some FoxO gene, which has been found in several other organisms but how does telomerase affect ...
2
votes
0answers
25 views

What is the role of RAGEs?

According to articles I read, AGEs (advanced glycation end products) activate RAGEs (receptors for AGEs). This activation increases the ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels in the cells. 2003 - ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

How can stem cells be counted in body?

In the study of supercentenarian woman here, it was found that all her blood cells are formed from only two stem cells (ancestor stem cells). How scientists can distinguish cell ancestors? Aren't ...
2
votes
0answers
36 views

Source of information on the evolution of aging/senescence

Do you know a good review (published peer-reviewed or an online course or whatever) that offers a good overview of all hypothesis explaining the various patterns linked with aging? I'd like this ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

In what ways can mechanisms of apoptosis be damaged?

How many ways can an Apoptosis mechanism be made disfunctional or irreparably damaged? If a cell has damaged Apoptosis mechanisms and it divides will its daughter cells have such damage?
1
vote
1answer
83 views

If inhibiting S6 kinase decreases protein translation, then could inhibiting S6 kinase could possibly slow down long-term potentiation in neurons?

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P70S6_kinase... Phosphorylation of S6 induces protein synthesis at the ribosome. P70S6 kinase is in a signaling pathway that includes mTOR (the mammalian ...
1
vote
3answers
99 views

Does DNA influence death (e.g. by cell aging)

I know that we age because of errors in the cell replication process and these errors eventually leads to death. If we exclude environmental factors, are there any other factors that can cause these ...
1
vote
1answer
6 views

If crocodiles are k-selected, why do they supposedly “not age,” as in avoid senescence?

I recently saw a few sources stating that Crocodiles do not biologically age, implying negligible senescence. Basically, a 70 year old crocodile is in the same physical/health condition as a 7 year ...
1
vote
0answers
8 views
1
vote
0answers
13 views

Do “old” or damaged organs leak out damaging substances? [closed]

I'm wondering whether "old" or damaged organs leak out some substances (like free radicals or others) that damage other organs. For example consider a 50 years old healthy person. Assume for the sake ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Senescence in space

How is senescence of individual eukaryotic cells and tissues affected by gravity and zero-gravity environments? In other words, can eukaryotic cells live forever in space (given the appropriate ...
1
vote
0answers
115 views

What is the name of systemic tension of muscles?

I meat a overtrained friend (25 years old) who cannot rest. He has all muscles and most of the skin very tense. He is practising regularly in gym and sleep badly. He moves like a stick figure and has ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

Does the second law of thermodynamics cause aging? [closed]

What is the current understanding as to why organisms age and die? In the following explanation on Ask an Engineer, entropy is not even considered (despite it being answered by an engineer). Unless ...
0
votes
2answers
256 views

How is it that the WI-38 cell line isolated by Hayflick in 1962 is still very much around and not affected by the 'Hayflick Limit'?

I have searched the net and I have not been able to come up with an clear answer. Edit: Here is the para quoted from Nature http://www.nature.com/news/medical-research-cell-division-1.13273 "So began ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

How does the body repair extracellular damage caused by glucose?

So we know that glucose is an aldehyde that can cause cell damage to the lysine and arginine residues on proteins through the Maillard Reaction (among other damaging reactions that glucose ...
0
votes
0answers
53 views

Disposable Soma Theory and the case of the contraposition

According to August Weismann (1889), Kirkwood and Holliday (1979): Because of the evolution of an organism that is segregated into soma and germ cells, soma becomes disposable, and in the face of ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Hair whitening with age explanation

I don't understand, why the hairs are whitening with age? Popular explanations look formal to me. For example, an explanation by stopping of melanin production is just a rephrase. Melanin is a ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Determination of Ageing by ECG inclusions/exclusions?

I am studying ageing and considering ECG signal because of its high sensitivity in theory (escardio). Some factors Sensitivity Gender Medical treatment ... Benchmark: RTG dental + wrist ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Why do multicellular organisms die of old age? [duplicate]

According to this answer, bacteria do not really age, just some offspring of the bacteria have more damage and die to let other bacteria live. Most cells in an animal are "new" cells and are not the ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

What is the term for being younger than the body age?

I remember that I once attended a seminar in which the speaker talked about the heart rate of different kinds of butterflies. Normally, the heart rate of the adult butterfly will be more complex than ...
0
votes
0answers
138 views

What is the reason our body stops producing collagen/elastin?

Stops producing elastin at around 14 years old. Collagen -- at 25-30. What is the reason?
0
votes
0answers
83 views

Known ways to modify the genetic structure of the 13 loci used in CODIS

After reading the answer to Does our DNA change during our lives?, I was wondering if and how it would be possible to change the structure of the 13 loci that are used in the CODIS database, in such a ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

Fibrinous inflammation, exudate and scarring in monotonous movements and ageing

I have palpated many hard organs during my work and studies. I have seen many young and old people who have hard organs, like very hard shoulder - very common. I have interviewed some of them, some ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Can we define biological age? [duplicate]

How can we define ageing from a biological standpoint without making an appeal to chronological age? Related, but less important, are there any metrics we can use to determine someone's biological ...