The process of biological aging or the state of an organism being biologically old.

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Do trees age on a microscopic level?

Most animals age via at least two mechinisms: at a "macroscopic" level, basically wear and tear to the point where (on evolutionary time scales) it's more genetically advantageous to optimize for ...
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5answers
605 views

Why do we age? or Do we have a theory of senescence?

There seem to be a number of ideas about why we age. Hypotheses include the gradual accumulation of cell metabolic products affecting organism function and the reduction of telomere length during cell ...
10
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1answer
587 views

Why does hair turn grey or white, and why does it happen later for some?

The question is pretty simple: what is happening molecularly when hair turns grey or white? I would imagine that it is due to the lack of a particular compound. I'm also interested in why some ...
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4answers
1k views

Why is the Hydra Biologically Immortal?

I have heard that the Hydra organism is biologically immortal (later I found that there are more immortal organisms). Now I know that its immortality is related to its telomerase. The thing is that we ...
13
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1answer
634 views

Are human bodies programmed to die?

Following from this question: What is the evolutionary advantage of death?: Is there any evidence that human bodies have systemic self-destruction built into their developmental program? I'm not ...
13
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1answer
254 views

Why do some trees have a life span, while some don't?

I have heard that there is no limit on the growth of trees, but then why do some trees, such as boxelders and poplars, tend to live shorter than redwoods, for example? Some advertisements for improved ...
6
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1answer
122 views

How are new people created from the DNA of an aged person. i.e. Why are we young?

The question "why do we age" has been asked numerous times. But why are we young? The cells of the adult human being are an age (time>0), but how can old cells create new cells that are younger than ...
4
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2answers
369 views

Is there any kind of immortality in plants?

I asked a question about immortality of hydra and leaned good things about senescence. Now I like to know about immortality signs in plants. If there is some kind of immortality in plants its process ...
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2answers
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Is there an advantage to linear chromosomes?

The DNA copying enzymes have a hard time working to the end of a chromosome. For circular chromosomes this is not a problem, since there is not a sharp 'end'. However, for a linear chromosome, without ...
4
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1answer
751 views

How do caspase proteins kill a cell?

Wikipedia just says... The active effector caspases then proteolytically degrade a host of intracellular proteins to carry out the cell death program. Okay, but what parts of the cell do they ...
3
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1answer
363 views

Could inhibition of progerin formation slow the rate at which a body ages?

According to wikipedia, progerin is activated in senescent cells. The protein itself is known to be the cause of a rare affliction 'progeria' - a disease marked by accelerated aging of the body. This ...
2
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1answer
75 views

Difference In Telomeres Between A Thale Cress Plant And A Methuselah Tree

From what I have read and understood telomeres cap off how many times a cell can divide before it can no longer divide and that is what causes aging. A thale cress plant apparently has a life cycle ...