A connection between neurons, which is either continuous (in electrical synapses) or interrupted by a cleft (in chemical synapses), through which communication is established.

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How does Sodium Valproate cause neural plasticity

I have been reading a fascinating paper: Valproate reopens critical-period learning of absolute pitch 18 individuals were given Sodium Valproate (VPA) for a fortnight during which they trained on a ...
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36 views

Can a postsynaptic neuron 'shut itself off?

I am an amateur interested in neuroscience and was curious whether there is a process by which a neuron or group of neurons would close their receptors and stop receiving signals from specific ...
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39 views

Biological advantage of electric synapses

Electric synapses are synapses that do not process information but simply foward one action potential from one neuron to the next. There are no neurotransmitters, no inhibitory and exitatory ...
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493 views

Can a neuron make a synapse onto itself?

I was wondering if a neuron can make a synapse to itself? I suspect that it would be extremely unusual for a neuron to do this. Anyway, has anyone seen even a single instance of this? Is the process ...
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Which pathways/mechanisms could control some Synaptic clefts in series by Somatic Nervous System?

I listened a talk where the speaker said that this can probably be possible by Weak Quantum Cognition Theory. I see that there is no evidence at the moment, only theory. I see no pathways by which ...
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50 views

Deducing synaptic strength from electron micrographs?

There are several promising techniques for connectomics based on iterative sectioning and imaging of tissue with scanning electron microscopes (e.g. FIB-SEM and ATUM) By looking at such micrographs, ...
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97 views

What is the full name of E. G. Gray?

E. G. Gray is Neuro scientist who found and described first the two major morphologically defined synapse types (Gray Type I (asymmetric) and II (symmetric)) in his work E G Gray (Oct. 1959). ...
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124 views

What happens in the synapse when cocaine administration occurs in the human brain

As far as i know when you accept cocaine in your blood some cocaine molecules reach some synapses in your brain and fill some Reuptake tunnels preventing the cell to simply "do not know that fired ...
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What's the difference between Cytoplasmic pool and Granular storage pool?

What's the difference between Cytoplasmic pool and Granular storage pool when speaking about neurotransmitters and synaptic cleft. I encountered this here: Amphetamine’s mechanism of action thus ...
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114 views

How are synaptic vesicles brought to the synapse?

I'm reading about how synaptobrevin is used to identify synaptic vesicles for tethering near the synaptic cleft. Since neurons have a synapse and dendrites, I'd like to know how exactly the vesicles ...
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349 views

Is it possible to lose synapses over time?

I mean, what if a person is for a long time submitted to conditions in which his mental capacities are not explored, are the synapses undone? I've heard that drugs may cause such an effect, but what ...
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How does an inhibitory synapse communicate to the cell body of a neuron?

I picture a neuron as having multiple trees of dendrites attached to the cell body with a single axon leaving the cell body. I believe the cell body near the axon root makes the decision to fire or ...
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Under what conditions do dendritic spines form?

I'm looking for resources or any information about the formation of dendritic spines and synaptogenesis, especially in relation to how new connections are formed on a daily basis. Does the ...