A measure of how hot or cold something is, measured in degrees Fahrenheit or Celsius, or Kelvin.

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Why do low temperatures kill

Why can't we (human, or even unicellular organisms) withstand low (body) temperatures (5 - 25°C). I have a limited background in chemistry and biology, so this might be obvious, but not to me. I know ...
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What's the feedback regulation of Thyroid diseases and body temperature?

While going through the feedback regulation, the control of blood glucose level by insulin and glucagon is quite discussed in multiple materials including the textbook. I also understand the basic ...
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30 views

How do cold conditions help organ transplants?

Body organs are kept cold in-between explanting them from the donor and implanting them in the new host. How do these cold conditions help organs to stay viable while they haven't fresh blood, energy ...
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108 views

How much heat can a human sustain? [closed]

For how long can a human sustain a temperature of 180 degrees Fahrenheit (82oC) without damage in a confined place? For instance, suppose a person is sitting in a steam-filled room, without external ...
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106 views

Biopython - Big Discrepancy Calculating RNA melting Temperature over Literature

I experience big discrepancies when calculating melting temperature of RNA 7-mers with Biopython over values generated by a popular algorithm. I tried the nearest neighbour algorithm with RNA and ...
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122 views

How does the brain cool itself?

Thoughout life everyone tells you that brain is essentially a computer but just like computers your brain would create immense amounts of heat by being in use, so if that's the case how does it cool ...
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296 views

Do humans perceive temperature or heat-flux? (or both?)

The general understanding is that when I touch an object, I perceive its (relative) temperature. A metal object at room temperature, however, will often feel cool to the touch. This leads me to ...
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418 views

Why do endotherms need more food than ectotherms?

I have a rough idea: its as endotherms need more food to keep their temperature stable whilst ectotherms use less of their food in respiration, but that's just me parroting the textbook I don't really ...
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Why do we experience temperatures below 37 degrees Celsius as 'hot'? [duplicate]

We always prefer to be in 20-25° C, although our core temperature is about 37°? Why is our skin temperature lower than our core temperature?
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93 views

What is the effect of persistent hypothermia on cardiac performance?

I define persistent hypothermia in this thread about the mechanisms of persistent hypothermia. The Graph of Katzung et al. in Pharmacology about Heart Failure: I am thinking which parts here are ...
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58 views

At which temperature is the Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus destroyed?

At which temperature is the Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus destroyed? If there is no data specifically for TBEV, is there any data for typical temperatures at which other Flaviviruses / Flaviviridae / ...
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194 views

Is the activity of enzymes in the human body affected by the outer temperature?

I have to do a research about the enzymes in the human body and the things that affect them. I know that the body temperature affects the activity of enzyemes but I'd like to know if the outer ...
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66 views

Which organs in the body are responsible for measuring temperature?

As an instrumentation engineer, I have designed temperature control systems capable of measuring and controlling temperature with a precision of 0.001K over a wide temperature range. I have always ...
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922 views

Why does temperature shock kill fish?

As is advised with most fish you should avoid sudden changes in water temperature (for example by introducing new water that hasn't been left to come to room temperature). I have, however, never ...
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84 views

Why humans have the temperature they have?

It is obviously very onerous to generate heat at all, although it has advantages. We don't have to lie on the sun like a crocodile to get warmer. And we avoid the freezing of our body water by out own ...
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2k views

What happens to our body when we undergo a sudden temperature change?

We know that a glass gets cracked when it undergoes sudden change in temperature. But what will happen in the case of a human body if it changes from the maximum(>35 C) to the minimum ...
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173 views

Do people often blow out the air from their lungs a lot when living in the cold condition to keep their lungs warm?

In a cold climate, do people often blow out the air from their lungs a lot when living in the cold condition to keep their lungs warm? I asked this question because it could connect to how people in ...
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1answer
186 views

Scrotal temperature and vascularization

The testes (at least in human males) are vascular organs, the vascularization extending even o the interstitial spaces of the seminiferous tubules. The function of the scrotal sac, is to isolate the ...
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3answers
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In Japan, the official average body temperature is 36.0 °C. Why so different from that of Europe?

The Japanese Wikipedia states that the average human body temperature is 36.0 °C (here,"ヒト"). The statement references the data from the Japanese government. Actually all of my Japanese friends think ...
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149 views

Does the body lose energy or gain energy relatively when drinking or eating hot things?

Does the body lose or gain energy when drinking or eating hot things compared to more neutral temperature things? On the one hand, The body could somehow convert the heat energy into human usable ...
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767 views

How do individual plants adapt to changes in temperature?

If you grow a plant from seed in your nice warm house, then plant it out in your temperate garden, it will stop growing for a while, possibly die, and if not, subsequently resume growth. Standard ...
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1answer
48 views

Storing Apples at 30F?

This article about storing apples for the winter says: You do not want the apples' temperature to fall below 30°F (-1.1°C), however, because that will make them freeze and turn to mush when ...
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92 views

Cereal Alpha and Beta Amylase temperature range and reaction rate

This question is motivated by a practical application in bread making. While it is well known which are the optimal (highest reaction rate) temperatures for both alpha and beta amylase, I am not able ...
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919 views

Is human face more resistant to cold than other body parts?

Walking outside tonight in -15˚C I realized an interesting observation: While I felt cold on most part of my body, my face (although the only uncovered part) didn't really feel cold. It registered the ...
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139 views

Long term effects of “brain freeze” on the cerebral vasculature

According to one theory, ice cream headaches are caused by an increase in blood volume of the anterior cerebral artery: Another theory into the cause of ice-cream headaches is explained by ...
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207 views

Neuroscience of temperature regulation and perception

The hypothalamus is known to be important in the regulation of body temperature, but I'm curious whether anyone knows about the neurocircuitry of perceived temperature. It seems like there could be a ...
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Does body temperature affect human lifespan?

If a human body were somehow to be kept at a cold temperature (say 30C) for the entire life of the given individual. And somehow the brain could be fooled into thinking that this 30C feels nice and ...
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801 views

Temperature Tolerance In Relationship To Body Temperature

A humans body temperature averages at around 98.6°F A dog's body temperature averages at around 101.5°F If the temperature ...
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What's the maximum and minimum temperature a human can survive?

This is a question that has been in my mind since I was a kid. I'm not a doctor, nor even a biology student, just a curious person. What is the minimum and maximum temperature a human body can stand ...
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782 views

How is temperature sensed?

Can anyone summarize the mechanism by which when an object of a given temperature is placed in contact with, say, the skin on a human fingertip, the average speed of the particles of the object is ...