Questions regarding how the brain interprets information from the eyes. Consider using the "eyes" tag for discussion of eye anatomy, physiology and evolution.

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6answers
3k views

What is the use of eye banks, if eyeball transplants do not exist at present?

Corneas are donated and transplanted, but not the eyeball. I don't understand. What is the purpose of donating a cornea without an eyeball to a blind person?
8
votes
2answers
98 views

If human eyes watch an area, what's the shape of its capturing shape? Rectangular? Half spherical?

A normal camera can capture a rectangular image. If human eyes watch an area, what's the shape of the captured region? Rectangular? Half-spherical?
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Does pupil size affect image focus in persons with no lens?

If an individual has no lens like Claude Monet (who had them removed). They should be able to still focus the images they see in a well light area if they shrink their pupils to a very small size ...
2
votes
0answers
27 views

How can eyeglasses improve vision beyond 100%? [on hold]

The result of a vision test by my oculist yielded a result of more than 100% while wearing prescription glasses. I wonder, how can a person see better using eyeglasses?
1
vote
1answer
18 views

Can we directly stimulate M cones in retina with current technology?

I wonder if we could try to see imaginary "supergreen" color by directly stimulating M cones. For this I suppose we'd need: Non-destructively scan specific human's retina to locate exact positions ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Congenital blindness due to retinitis pigmentosa - does it exist?

Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) patients typically become blind after a period of years in which their eye sight slowly deteriorates. Generally they develop night-blindness first, then tunnel vision, after ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

Do human visual functions degenerate due to genetic factors or by external factors?

Does eyesight primarily deteriorate 'naturally' due to genetics (genomic/epigenomic factors), or due to external factors such as normal wear and tear, or disease? By normal wear and tear I include ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

A subtle test for color-blindness [closed]

Is there a test method of proving a person being color-blind, without letting the test subject know, that he/she is being tested? E.g. showing the person cards with colored dots like depicted here is ...
4
votes
0answers
11 views

Would constant light or fading light be registered as more wakefulness promoting by the Supra Chiasmatic Nucleus?

During the fall and winter season, a number of people are experiencing Seasonal Affective Disorder. One of the way it has traditionally been treated is with a dedicated lightbox - a very high ...
4
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1answer
94 views

Do blind people learn Braille equally fast as the sighted? [closed]

The visually deprived brain undergoes extensive remodeling due to cross-modal plasticity. This leads to increased areas of the cortex being available for other purposes such as tactile processing. Now ...
6
votes
0answers
68 views

effect of pupil responses on the electroretinogram

The electroretinogram is generally considered to reflect the retinal processing of a light stimulus, typically a photoreceptor response followed by secondary neuronal activity. However, I am wondering ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Like size and colour constancy, why does the brain not maintain focus constancy?

I have progressive myopia. I grew up with perfectly normal eyes but slowly started getting myopic. The thing is, my brain knows (or should know) what the world looks like -- it knows that far away ...
3
votes
0answers
36 views

Are some facial features more important than others in human facial recognition?

I'm often surprised by the human ability to correctly identify other individuals despite significant modifications due to ageing, hairstyle, injury etc. But, sometimes the addition of a beard and a ...
4
votes
3answers
224 views

Is human vision sensitive to frequency or wavelength?

In a vacuum, there is a one-to-one correspondence between light frequency ($\nu$) and wavelength ($\lambda$), ie. $\lambda=c/\nu$. But in a refractive medium, $\lambda=v/\nu$, so while the frequency ...
6
votes
1answer
80 views

How does myopia develop, exactly?

Recently I was reading about myopia and I understood a few basic facts about it: Its initial cause is a constant spasm in the ciliary muscle. To do less work, the eyeball elongates a tiny bit. ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Does Spinning dancer has anything to do with your eyesight

I came across the spinning dancer as part of the brain test to determine left brain vs right brain dominance. I saw the dancer is turning clockwise. The other people around me saw it turning ...
12
votes
1answer
2k views

What do you see when your eyes are closed?

If you are in pitch black and you close your eyes, you sometimes can see strange shapes of various colors. A lot of the time these shapes and colors change as you observe them. This phenomenon still ...
9
votes
2answers
67 views

Is mammalian vision processed as a sequence of frames?

I often read that people believe that human vision has an inherent frames-per-second rate (FPS) that causes stroboscopic effects - such as seeing the spokes of a rotating wheel apparently rotating at ...
5
votes
1answer
67 views

Can the negative afterimage appear only if there is light or is it possible in darkness?

Reading the following paragraph: After staring at the red and blue shamrock, you saw a green and yellow afterimage. Opponent-process theory proposes that as you stared at the red and blue ...
7
votes
1answer
898 views

Dark veil when getting up too fast

I was asking myself this weird question. When you get up or stand up too fast, sometimes, you see something like a dark veil, and you aren't able to see anything distinctly for 2 or 3 seconds, then ...
3
votes
1answer
95 views

How much energy is required to blind someone?

As I understand the ravages of sunlight upon the (human) eye; the cause of ocular damage and blindness is too much energy delivered to the cones and rods that ultimately make up our eyes; so the ...
5
votes
1answer
93 views

How does someone with red-green colorblindness see yellow on a monitor/television?

I recently watched the video This Is Not Yellow explaining how red, green, and blue pixels can be used to create images of all other colors. Since yellow is created with red and green pixels, how is a ...
0
votes
0answers
65 views

Are insects attracted to near infrared light?

Do insects see near infrared light? If yes, are they attracted to it at night, as they are to visible light sources? I am building something similar to a home-made trailcam with a Raspberry Pi ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

What is the focus distance of a 3D screen?

I've thought long and hard about wheter this is the appropriate section for this question, because I guess it's kind of an interdisciplinary subject. My understanding of stereopsis (please, correct ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

How well does the event-driven DVS sensor approximate the rods of the retina?

There is a neuromorphic vision sensor that is generating some interesting research these days that is called the Dynamic Vision Sensor. One of the claims of this sensor is good approximation of the ...
9
votes
1answer
170 views

Seeing strange things in light

I have noticed that if you look directly at tubelight (I have only white ones in my home) and close your eyes little, you see little random shaped colourless things sometimes with slow speed and ...
5
votes
2answers
78 views

Improving myopia

I have a friend who no longer needs glasses. He previously had myopia in both eyes but over the years it has improved until he no longer needs glasses clinically. He's had glasses for over 30 years ...
-1
votes
1answer
72 views

Does our brain really “flip” images perceived by our eyes?

I know a similar question has been asked and this is closely related to cognitive science. However, I want to know whether is there any mechanism or structure in the visual cortex which is proved to ...
0
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0answers
542 views

The process of how you visually perceive objects?

Use the following terms to describe in detail how you visually perceive an object that you can see right now. Use the terms in order to correctly describe the sequence of events involved in your ...
8
votes
1answer
97 views

Dogs bark at familiar person in Santa costume. Why? Don't dogs trust smell over vision?

Last night 10 humans and 2 dogs spent Christmas together. At some point, one human dissappears for a few minutes and comes back wearing a full Santa outfit. Upon respawning, the dogs start barking ...
2
votes
0answers
85 views

How is color information transmitted from eye to brain?

Is it frequency-modualated or are different colors transmitted by different axons? I know that each ganglion cell is connected to multiple photoreceptors. How does it tell the brain which ...
2
votes
0answers
46 views

How well do we notice asynchronicity?

I'm stopped at a stoplight and, with nothing to do, my thoughts wander to the timed don't-walk sign that governs any pedestrians who might wish to cross the street I'm driving along. I can see two ...
2
votes
1answer
145 views

Why don't we have more cone cells (bigger fovea)?

Background Apart from being able to sense color, cone cells are able to perceive finer detail and more rapid changes in images, because their response times to stimuli are faster than those of rods. ...
15
votes
1answer
151 views

Haidinger's brush: Is this a by-product of the eye's physics, or are there any evolutionary grounds for it?

The human eye is, very subtly, sensitive to the polarization of light. This is an effect known as Haidinger's brush (see Wikipedia article of this name). What, if anything, is known or at least ...
1
vote
1answer
409 views

Is it safe to look at infrared LEDs?

What happens if one looks directly at infrared LEDs? Sometimes I see this kind of LED at night as red dots and I'm also courious about it. I was wondering what would happened if one looked directly ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Radial Basis Function Network (RBF Network)

In the Wikipedia article on radial basis function network, I didn't understand what was meant by "center vector for neuron i", in other words "center of the RBF units called also prototype".
3
votes
0answers
58 views

The Operation of tuning in the S1 layer of ventral model

According to my previous question in ventral Stream pathway and architecture, I want now to get a brief example about how the S1 layer is constructed. In other words, how all the simple units are ...
3
votes
1answer
186 views

Ventral stream pathway and architecture proposed by Poggio's group

Please can you give me a very brief explanation about all functions in the ventral stream architecture summarized in this figure: This figure is from Serre et al.'s A quantitative theory of ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the equivalent of shutter-speed in Human eye?

I just learned that in video cameras, every frame of the video has its own shutter speed. And I know how frame-rate in human eye works out, well, not completely, hence the question. ...
3
votes
2answers
149 views

Why do our eyes “wrap” hue from UV to IR?

On the high-wavelength side of things, we see almost-infrared as reddish, with a slight tinge of magenta. On the low side, we see violet fading into the same magenta color. Why is that? You can see ...
10
votes
1answer
142 views

Are there specific conditions that allow humans to see ultraviolet wavelengths

It is fairly common knowledge that the lens in its normal state absorbs ultraviolet (UV) radiation. An interesting notion has come up from time to time in my reading that suggests there are a small ...
4
votes
1answer
106 views

Was life less colorful before color vision evolved?

According to Wikipedia, we know that color-vision photopigments appeared in the common ancestors of tetrapods and fish at least 360 MY ago. Would life have been less colorful before the evolution of ...
5
votes
0answers
266 views

Reason for seeing grid-like patterns when strobing a solid black-white image?

I was trying to do some stimulation for SSVEPs by strobing a solid black square and a solid white square. Weird thing was, I ended up seeing weird grid like patterns that looked like this, always of ...
1
vote
1answer
152 views

If people with colorblindness lack one type of cone cells, shouldn't they be unable to recognize one particular color?

The 3 types of cone cells in normal humans allow them to view 3 types of colors and any color made from mixing and matching those 3. So, 2 types of cone cells should only allow to view just 2 types ...
2
votes
2answers
108 views

Do people with colorblindness have less cones or no cones of a certain type?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_blindness#Red.E2.80.93green_color_blindness Protanopia (1% of males): Lacking the long-wavelength sensitive retinal cones, Deuteranopia (1% of males): ...
5
votes
4answers
396 views

Are there animals which can see movements better than shapes or colors?

I remember that in Michael Crichton's novel Jurassic Park, Tyrannosaurus Rex was supposed to have movement based vision. (Of course, that is a novel and not a scientific text.) I have also noticed ...
3
votes
3answers
212 views

What exactly is the neural receptive field?

Neural receptive fields map the spatial or temporal distribution of the data to individual neuron excitation, if I understand correctly, but I do not understand if receptive fields (especially in the ...
5
votes
1answer
150 views

Are these claims of “revolutionising” understanding of human vision and hearing valid?

I've started a hobby machine vision project (and posted some questions to this end on other SE sites) and on a side track, also been looking at relevant research in human vision (and partly, hearing). ...
0
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2answers
10k views

What is it called when one human eye is seeing brighter color than the other?

What is the name of a phenomenon where one of the human eyes is seeing brighter/more saturated color than the other? I can observe the same object from the same position while alternating which eye is ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Animal UV vision

It is reasonably well known that many species, such as bees and some types of birds as examples can see into the ultraviolet (UV). How is the structure of their eye different to humans to allow this? ...