Questions regarding how the brain interprets information from the eyes. Consider using the "eyes" tag for discussion of eye anatomy, physiology and evolution.

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107 views

Do people with colorblindness have less cones or no cones of a certain type?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_blindness#Red.E2.80.93green_color_blindness Protanopia (1% of males): Lacking the long-wavelength sensitive retinal cones, Deuteranopia (1% of males): ...
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1answer
43 views

The Eye, and Camera Lenses

How do near sightedness, farsightedness, and normal sightedness work? If the eye is accustomed to one small focal point, how can it manage a wall of light? And also, how does it process the small ...
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1answer
2k views

What negative effects can pinhole glasses have on the body?

While shopping in the local supermarket yesterday, I was surprised to find this display on one of the shelves. I also realize that I should have taken a pamphlet with me, as well as a picture of ...
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0answers
33 views

How well does the event-driven DVS sensor approximate the rods of the retina?

There is a neuromorphic vision sensor that is generating some interesting research these days that is called the Dynamic Vision Sensor. One of the claims of this sensor is good approximation of the ...
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0answers
77 views

How is color information transmitted from eye to brain?

Is it frequency-modualated or are different colors transmitted by different axons? I know that each ganglion cell is connected to multiple photoreceptors. How does it tell the brain which ...
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0answers
43 views

How well do we notice asynchronicity?

I'm stopped at a stoplight and, with nothing to do, my thoughts wander to the timed don't-walk sign that governs any pedestrians who might wish to cross the street I'm driving along. I can see two ...
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0answers
35 views

What processes are responsible for focusing on an image only seen by one of the eyes?

When a person is spying from around a corner with only one eye, it's rather easy to ignore the other eye's image, since it's probably much darker, because one usually spies around a corner standing ...
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1answer
202 views

What is the brightest color a light source that only emits blue frequency light can achieve?

Let's say there is a luminous light bulb that only emits blue light, and you (or a camera if you prefer) look at it from a close distance. Will the maximum brightness perceived not have any "white" to ...
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1answer
184 views

Is it safe to look at infrared LEDs?

What happens if one looks directly at infrared LEDs? Sometimes I see this kind of LED at night as red dots and I'm also courious about it. I was wondering what would happened if one looked directly ...
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1answer
144 views

If people with colorblindness lack one type of cone cells, shouldn't they be unable to recognize one particular color?

The 3 types of cone cells in normal humans allow them to view 3 types of colors and any color made from mixing and matching those 3. So, 2 types of cone cells should only allow to view just 2 types ...
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2answers
133 views

What gives observable light its colors? [duplicate]

I know that difference between different colors of light is difference between their wave length but I don't know what gives beautiful colors (like rainbow colors) to different wave length of ...
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1answer
60 views

Radial Basis Function Network (RBF Network)

In the Wikipedia article on radial basis function network, I didn't understand what was meant by "center vector for neuron i", in other words "center of the RBF units called also prototype".
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1answer
142 views

Why are trichromat cone cells unable to sense ultraviolet and infrared radiation?

I understand that cone cells vary in the color they sense, is this because of wavelength, frequency, something else, or a combination of the previous? I also understand that tetrachromats can see an ...
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1answer
67 views

Is there an optimal illumination level for human habitats/workplaces?

I know of melanopsin, a photo pigment in mammal eye that helps regulate circadian rhythms. It responds most strongly to blue spectrum light. There have been experiments that demonstrated that ...
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0answers
177 views

How do optical illusions work? [closed]

Hello fellow investigators I have two questions about optical illusions 1) A photo mosaic is something like this http://i.stack.imgur.com/Pzplp.png What are the optical principles behind our eye ...
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1answer
7k views

What is it called when one human eye is seeing brighter color than the other?

What is the name of a phenomenon where one of the human eyes is seeing brighter/more saturated color than the other? I can observe the same object from the same position while alternating which eye is ...
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0answers
18 views

Are insects attracted to near infrared light?

Do insects see near infrared light? If yes, are they attracted to it at night, as they are to visible light sources? I am building something similar to a home-made trailcam with a Raspberry Pi ...
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0answers
54 views

Does our brain really “flip” images perceived by our eyes?

I know a similar question has been asked and this is closely related to cognitive science. However, I want to know whether is there any mechanism or structure in the visual cortex which is proved to ...
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0answers
106 views

The process of how you visually perceive objects?

Use the following terms to describe in detail how you visually perceive an object that you can see right now. Use the terms in order to correctly describe the sequence of events involved in your ...
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117 views

Perception of distant lights without glasses

I am fairly short-sighted and wear glasses pretty much all the time. Naively, I would expect that when I take my glasses off, the image I see should look very much the same as as a photograph that's ...