Questions regarding how the brain interprets information from the eyes. Consider using the "eyes" tag for discussion of eye anatomy, physiology and evolution.

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8
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1answer
168 views

Dogs bark at familiar person in Santa costume. Why? Don't dogs trust smell over vision?

Last night 10 humans and 2 dogs spent Christmas together. At some point, one human dissappears for a few minutes and comes back wearing a full Santa outfit. Upon respawning, the dogs start barking ...
3
votes
1answer
55 views

Do blind birds bob their head when they walk?

Birds try to keep their heads still for short periods of time between steps to improve their ability to see. You can find amusing videos of chickens used as small video camera stabilizers. But does ...
52
votes
2answers
8k views

What is the evolutionary advantage of red-green color blindness?

Red-green colorblindness seems to make it harder for a hunter-gatherer to see whether a fruit is ripe and thus worth picking. Is there a reason why selection hasn't completely removed red-green ...
6
votes
2answers
340 views

Do animals exist which have great vision, but see only grayscale?

In computer vision the color information is often discarded, as most object recognition tasks seem to work just as well on the greyscale image (even better, because there is less unnecessary ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

Relaxing Eyes when using Virtual-Reality-Glasses?

Accommodation is the process by which the vertebrate eye changes optical power to maintain a clear image or focus on an object as its distance varies (eye focusing). For distant vision, the ciliary ...
12
votes
1answer
152 views

Why do I see different hues of colors between each of my eyes?

Frequently, I see colors with a slightly different hue when looking through my eyes individually. The right eye is more red-tinted ('warmer' hued) and the left is typically more blue-tinted ('cooler' ...
1
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0answers
13 views

Does the change in eye color (melanin concentration) affect the iris pattern?

In cases of acquired heterochromia, is there a quantifiable change in the iris pattern; the clefts , furrows, etc. If yes, what changes are observed? And if no, are there any diseases or acquired ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between myopia and hyperopia?

In myopia the lens is bending the light too much even in the most relaxed state. Thus the image is produced in front of the retina. If the object comes closer the lens just adjusts a bit less than a ...
14
votes
1answer
2k views

Why do we go blind for a few seconds after switching off the light?

At night, when I switch off the lights, I always seem to go blind for a while. The room becomes pitch black and I am unable to see anything. After a while, however, my vision slowly recovers and I ...
3
votes
0answers
17 views

Controlling the pursuit path of the human eye

The human eye scans images by panning focus along a certain path. Stork et al. (2002) revealed that there is a feedback process involved in moving ocular focus along a path that produces minimum ...
4
votes
3answers
454 views

What exactly is the neural receptive field?

Neural receptive fields map the spatial or temporal distribution of the data to individual neuron excitation, if I understand correctly, but I do not understand if receptive fields (especially in the ...
6
votes
1answer
46 views

Would constant light or fading light be registered as more wakefulness promoting by the Supra Chiasmatic Nucleus?

During the fall and winter season, a number of people are experiencing Seasonal Affective Disorder. One of the way it has traditionally been treated is with a dedicated lightbox - a very high ...
3
votes
2answers
326 views

Why do our eyes “wrap” hue from UV to IR?

On the high-wavelength side of things, we see almost-infrared as reddish, with a slight tinge of magenta. On the low side, we see violet fading into the same magenta color. Why is that? You can see ...
23
votes
2answers
5k views

Is it possible that by mutation a human could see infrared or other 'colours'?

Incoming light reacts with the several types of cone cells in the eye. In humans, there are three types of cones sensitive to three different spectra, resulting in trichromatic color vision. Each ...
4
votes
1answer
144 views

What are dreams, biologically?

Falling asleep or states of subconsciousness does not stop the mind from making its own fictional images. These seem like sensations just like those received from human eyes. But, how do we define ...
7
votes
1answer
230 views

How is color information transmitted from the eye to the brain?

Is color information sent from the eye to the brain frequency-modulated, or are different colors transmitted by different axons? I know that each ganglion cell is connected to multiple ...
22
votes
7answers
5k views

Why can't we see in low light if staring long enough?

For me it seems reasonable that if I kept my gaze on a fixed point in a room with low light, a progressively brighter and better picture would appear before my eyes, just like a camera can see in the ...
4
votes
1answer
9k views

Is it safe to look at infrared LEDs?

What happens if one looks directly at infrared LEDs? Sometimes I see this kind of LED at night as red dots and I'm also courious about it. I was wondering what would happened if one looked directly ...
2
votes
0answers
22 views

Do primate RGCs have overlapping receptive fields?

According to this link, http://hubel.med.harvard.edu/book/b10.htm retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) receive input from overlapping receptive fields (RFs). This is also an idea used in convolutional ...
4
votes
1answer
66 views

What determines the shape of the center-surround receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells?

The wikipedia article about receptive fields of visual system tells us the following: The receptive field is often identified as the region of the retina where the action of light alters the ...
8
votes
1answer
222 views

Are 2 eyes necessary for 3D vision?

To start off: I'm not a biology student, but a computer science major It has always been my understanding that humans have 2 eyes so that we can have 3D vision: the left eye see more of the left side ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Pulfrich-Effect explanation

The explanation of the Pulfrich effect on the Wikipedia only mentions that is probably because of a slower signal transduction for smaller retinal illumination. Is there a known explanation why the ...
1
vote
1answer
92 views

Why is it necessary to have both cone and rod cells in the eye?

Our eyes have both cone and rod cells. Rod cells measure the intensity of light whereas cone cells identify the colour of the image formed in the eyes. So cone cells must also be able to identify ...
4
votes
1answer
237 views

The arrangement of retinal cells?

The section of retina shows a layered arrangement of the various retinal cells. Starting from the inside (where the light strikes first) is the nerve fibre layer, ganglionic layer, amacrine cell ...
7
votes
1answer
101 views

Perception of white in the absence of rods

If the retina would not have any cones, one would be color blind. If white is the presence of all colors (in the matter of color mixture, not addition), then what would white look like without rods?
0
votes
1answer
564 views

Are there animals / mammals which only have one eye?

Do all animals (of a certain size and not thinking about worms) have the possibility to perceive depth? Do all mammals have at least two eyes? Are there mammals with more than two eyes?
12
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5answers
3k views

What is the difference between a circular and a cat's-eye (slit) pupil?

I've been to local zoo the other day and one lizard caught my attention: its pupils are circular, which, I thought, is not usual for reptiles. Turns out it is, but now I can't find any explanation on ...
18
votes
1answer
876 views

Why can't I read everything in my field of view?

When I look at a piece of text, I can see all the text on the paper, no matter where I look, because my field of view covers it all. However, if I stare at a specific word, I cannot read the text a ...
5
votes
1answer
132 views

Colorblindness in females and random X chromosome inactivation

From Annenberg Learner: Because the X is inactivated randomly in cells, one cell could have the maternal X inactivated, while the adjacent cell could have the paternal X inactivated. This causes ...
6
votes
2answers
346 views

Why can't our eyes smoothly transition from side to side without focusing on a moving object?

Why are we not able to slowly and smoothly look from side to side, or up and down in a single and smooth transition, given that we are able to do this if our eyes are focused on a moving object?
1
vote
2answers
150 views

Is there a difference between visual sensation and imagination in the brain?

How substantial is the difference between the neural signal associated with seeing an image and the imagination of that image? Surely, it can not entirely copy the pathway from the sensory organs to ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

All-trans-retinal being converted back to 11-cis-retinal or vitamin A

There are two pathways all-trans-retinal can take after detaching from the scotopsin: (1) it can convert back to 11-cis-retinal, or (2) it can convert to all-trans-retinol (form of vitamin A), which ...
8
votes
2answers
144 views

How many mega pixels does the eye have?

What is the number of mega pixels available in the human eye? It seems that newer camera models continuously keep increasing their pixel count. However, they never seem to be capable of reproducing ...
6
votes
1answer
132 views

What is the function of the human eye white?

If you have a look at the eyes of most animals, you never see the white part unless the eyes are averted. In contrast, humans always have the whites visible because the iris is quite small. The only ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

Why doesn't the ambient lighting condition change the perception of colors we see on a monitor?

Suppose that I take a picture of an object illuminated by an incandescent light bulb and I choose the daylight white balance setting. The picture I then get will display a white object as looking ...
3
votes
2answers
245 views

How can some animals see ultraviolet or infrared light?

I know that some animals like birds, bees, and fish can see ultraviolet and infrared light. Whether it to detect flowers that bare nectar, or the urine trails of prey. But what I don't understand is ...
2
votes
1answer
156 views

What causes the bright flash of light when poking my eye?

Recently, I poked myself in between my eye and eye socket, right below my eyebrow, and sometimes I would get this flash of light. Others have tried this too, and they also had a flash of light. I am ...
14
votes
1answer
268 views

Effect of pupil responses on the electroretinogram

The electroretinogram (ERG) is a measure of electrical activity of the retina. It is typically recorded from the cornea with a wire electrode or gold-foil electrode. Generally, the the ERG is ...
13
votes
2answers
278 views

Are some animals, like dogs and cats, color-blind and how do we know that?

I have heard that some animals, including dogs, cats and donkeys, are color-blind. They cannot recognize any color. Is that true? And how can humans verify that animals are color-blind, or not? During ...
3
votes
3answers
36k views

What is it called when one human eye is seeing brighter color than the other?

What is the name of a phenomenon where one of the human eyes is seeing brighter/more saturated color than the other? I can observe the same object from the same position while alternating which eye is ...
4
votes
2answers
270 views

What is the relationship between W, X, Y and P, M retinal ganglion cells?

In Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology (12e) the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are classified into W, X, and Y types. However, in Gray's Anatomy (40th ed.), RGS are subdivided into midget ...
8
votes
1answer
132 views

How well does it actually work to surgically reroute the optical nerve?

Two publications, Roe et al, 1992[1] and Metin & Frost, 1989[2], describe results pertaining to the ability of a region of cortex to process information from a different sensory mode than the one ...
0
votes
1answer
84 views

How do we perceive acceleration?

Today me and my friend were coming on motor bike and I was sitting opposite direction because I was holding something in my hand (and it was fun :P). When he started bike I felt very high ...
12
votes
1answer
2k views

How does this illusion work?

I found this image on Google+ If you shake your head you can see a portrait of a person. Can anyone explain how the image is constructed in the brain?
1
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0answers
39 views

Seeing through the rain

This question leads me to wonder about seeing in and through rain. From visual point of view, rain is light-bending droplets moving downwards, unformly in steady rain, less uniformly if there's ...
10
votes
1answer
375 views

Is it a limitation of the eyes, or the brain, that we can't see a moving bullet?

Are the photoreceptors in our eyes not fast enough to register the fast moving bullet, or is the brain not powerful enough to make sense of something happening that fast?
2
votes
0answers
33 views

Can a stationary eye with a moving pupil exist? [closed]

I am making a sci-fi web-comic set on an alien world and I thought up an idea for an eye that works much like an eye from a mammal, but instead of moving the whole eye, only the pupil moves. This idea ...
25
votes
1answer
10k views

What do you see when your eyes are closed?

If you are in pitch black and you close your eyes, you sometimes can see strange shapes of various colors. A lot of the time these shapes and colors change as you observe them. This phenomenon still ...
1
vote
1answer
140 views

Can my eyes adjust instantly to my friend's glasses? [closed]

My eyesight is pretty much perfect, but I noticed that whenever I try any of my friends glasses, from really thin to extremely thick, my eyes seem to adjust to them within seconds and let me see ...
1
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0answers
224 views

Would a VR headset exacerbate myopia or could it be used to retrain the eyes?

I've learned that there are two primary hypotheses to explain myopia: not enough use of distance vision or not enough sunlight If the distance between an eye and what it's focusing on is the primary ...