1
vote
1answer
106 views

What are the effects of muscle and fat mass on survivability?

If we have humans A, B and C who are different: A is thin (skinny) without significant muscle or fat mass. B is muscular C is fat Which one of them has the best body for survival in accidents like ...
1
vote
1answer
121 views

Which is the correct statement on proteins?

I need help with one of the questions on my biochemistry assignment Choose the correct statement on proteins: a) proteins are folded by alpha-helix b) proteins can preserve their function even if ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Does a large effective population size result in faster decay of linkage disequilibrium (LD)?

I am thinking about an invasive species that was introduced into North America just a few (<20) generations ago. Using microsatellite genotypes (105 loci), I have identified almost no significant ...
2
votes
2answers
530 views

Do primates other than humans have a consistent sleep schedule?

I'm doing some sleep research and would like to compare a human sleep pattern as recorded by a wrist-based actigraph with a "natural" sleep pattern, such as from apes. In an experiment like that, a ...
5
votes
1answer
293 views

Skeletal muscles in clam

Although skeletal muscle fatigues fairly rapidly, clams have a protein called paramyosin that allows them to sustain contractions for up to a month. What might be the role of paramyosin at the ...
3
votes
2answers
299 views

Are identical twins exactly the same?

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=identical-twins-genes-are-not-identical According to this article some identical twins show differences with respect to their copy number variants. ...
1
vote
1answer
172 views

What is this awesome plant, which can close its leaves when touched?

I came across this video on Facebook where a plant closes its leaves when touched. Unfortunately the video does not mention the name of this awesome plant. What's the name of this plant, and where ...
1
vote
1answer
117 views

What is the chemical composition of an egg shell?

It ought to be some combination of C, O, and H, I presume. But really why should I care if eggshell gets in my eggs while I'm cooking?
2
votes
0answers
61 views

Critical pO2 threshold for cell division?

I'm a physicist asking questions on an aspect of cellular metabolism, so excuse my biological ignorance! Hypoxia is a frequent complication of certain tumour types, and has quite an implication for ...
4
votes
1answer
66 views

What would life expectancy be in the western world in the absence of Ischemic heart disease?

In 2012, the leading cause of death was Ischemic Heart Disease. In 1st world countries, what is the life expectancy for people who do not die of Ischemic Heart Disease? I'm interested in the USA, ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

How do inward rectifier potassium channels work in the heart?

Apparently in myocytes, there is an inward rectifier potassium channel that operates in phase 4 of the myocyte action potential. I have heard that while this is named as an inward rectifier, that ...
2
votes
1answer
19k views

Blood pressure difference while seated and laid down [closed]

My blood pressure readings differ a lot when I read them while seated and while I lay down on a bed. I tie the strap in both cases to my left bicep and rest for a minute before noting the readings ...
2
votes
1answer
118 views

What would classify those findings of the University of Sheffield experiment as aliens?

It's in the news that some experiment was able to capture some alien specimens during a meteor shower: ...
4
votes
2answers
371 views

Is life expectancy linked to intelligence in animals?

For example, animals that live only a few days or a few years are often not very intelligent. In contrast, the most intelligent animals seem to live longer. Is this true? Are there any studies to ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Renin - enzyme or hormone?

Wikipedia says : The kidneys secrete a variety of hormones, including erythropoietin, and the enzyme renin. Can a substance be both an enzyme and a hormone ? Why is renin both an enzyme and a ...
2
votes
1answer
98 views

How Do Acid and Base Loving Plants Get Enough PO4?

Acidic and Basic soils experience phosphate sequestration through binding with either calcium, aluminum, or iron. How do plant that thrive in acidic and basic soils obtain the necessary phosphate? ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

What did we learn with Nazi human experimentation?

Was there actually any useful knowledge gained from the Nazi experiments on human test subjects? Wikipedia cites freezing and phosphine gas reactions, but I would like to know other potential results ...
4
votes
1answer
113 views

Difference In Telomeres Between A Thale Cress Plant And A Methuselah Tree

From what I have read and understood telomeres cap off how many times a cell can divide before it can no longer divide and that is what causes aging. A thale cress plant apparently has a life cycle ...
2
votes
0answers
42 views

What's behind the amazing colour combinations in pests & insects?

What's behind the amazing colour combinations in pests & insects ? Do this colour combination signals any character/ poison of the pest/insect ?
6
votes
3answers
3k views

Why do neurons die so fast without oxygen and nutrients?

Some human tissue can survive without oxygen a couple of minutes, even hours. Why are the neurons are so "weak" and depends so much on oxygen and other nutrients and cannot live without them for ...
9
votes
2answers
3k views

Why is saltatory conduction faster than continuous conduction?

How does spacing apart sodium and potassium channels allow the action potential to travel faster down the axon? This is the reason always cited for saltatory conduction and myelination, but my mental ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

How does the matter that makes up the fat of your fat cells ultimately leave your body--following weight loss?

I'd like to get some clarification on specifically how the matter from the fat reserves of the Adipocyte physically leaves the body. In other words, if you were to somehow follow every atom in the ...
0
votes
2answers
155 views

How is it that the WI-38 cell line isolated by Hayflick in 1962 is still very much around and not affected by the 'Hayflick Limit'?

I have searched the net and I have not been able to come up with an clear answer. Edit: Here is the para quoted from Nature http://www.nature.com/news/medical-research-cell-division-1.13273 "So began ...
2
votes
1answer
197 views

GWAS: matched-pairs and logistic regression

Logistic regression is a common analysis tool used for GWAS when your response variable of interested is qualitative. It comes as one of the standard tools in most GWAS packages (e.g. PLINK). Most ...
6
votes
1answer
527 views

What is Mendelian Randomization, and how is it used to infer causality in epidemiology?

Studies of human traits and diseases are inherently confined to observational studies, known as epidemiological studies. This can make it very hard to determine what actually causes a particular ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

DAT1 dopamine and cocaine binding

I've searched the internet for several minutes and I've looked at DAT but I'm having trouble finding the DAT binding location. Where (and to which aa) does dopamine and cocaine bind to hDAT1?
2
votes
0answers
90 views

Mesophytic Climax community in succession?

My textbook says that in all cases of ecological succession (xerarch, hydrarch, etc.), the ultimate climax community, assuming constancy of environment, is a mesic community. Xeric or hydric pioneers ...
3
votes
0answers
143 views

how much grass does a sheep eat in square meters per day? [closed]

I want to buy some sheeps in order to eat my garden's grass. How much grass does a sheep eat each day ??
2
votes
1answer
448 views

How many consecutive cell divisions are required to form the adult human body from the single cell zygote?

The preferred question would have been what is the total number of cells in a full term human foetus and how many cell divisions are required to reach that number. However estimates of total cell ...
5
votes
1answer
132 views

Modern reference for Kropotkin's lazy bees

I have been reading through Peter Kropotkin's Mutual Aid: A Factor of Evolution and he mentions a curious fact about bees (bolding by me for emphasis): predatory instincts and laziness continue to ...
1
vote
1answer
124 views

Do spouses begin to share genes over time?

I apologize if this hypothesis sounds strange by I was wondering if any research had been done on a phenomenon which I've seen and have corroborated with many other - the idea that over time spouses ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What happens if an IV drip with a saline solution slips out of the vein, but keeps dripping into the body?

A patient has a saline solution IV drip into the vein. They have somehow moved around and the needle has fallen out of the vein, but remained in the body. Nobody has noticed and for a few hours water ...
1
vote
1answer
329 views

Number of introns in a genome

Humans have approximately 21000 genes but they probably make more proteins than that. This has been explained by many mechanisms like alternative RNA splicing. My question is - If what we call as ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

3 fates of this matter

When an animal eats something, it obtains matter and energy right? But, what are the 3 possible fates of the matter and 3 possible fates energy. I don't understand what they are even asking. What ...
3
votes
0answers
89 views

What's the Mechanism of Paradoxical Excitatory Effects with Sedating Antihistamines? [closed]

I've been reading the British National Formulary 65 (BNF-65) and it mentioned that in some, especially at higher dosages, sedating (first-generation) antihistamines, can produce paradoxical excitatory ...
1
vote
2answers
44 views

Why don't raisins lose water when in air?

It is common that we soak raisins in water, and they acquire water by endosmosis. That means that the cells are permeable to water, right? Then why don't they lose water when kept in air? Or kept in ...
3
votes
1answer
578 views

Why do brain cells use shuttles that pass electrons from NADH to FAD?

Brain cells are cells require one of the highest amount of energy of any cell of body. So why do they use a shuttle which will transfer electrons from NADH produced in glycolysis to FAD(and there by ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Molecular cause of cramps, spasms and strengthening in muscles? (incl. intro to muscle contraction)

When motor neurons are stimulated to trigger an action potential, this potential propagates down the spine, eventually reaching a neuromuscular junction, causing the release of acetylcholine (ACh). ...
3
votes
2answers
661 views

Can any one reaction in a cell be at equilibrium?

I know that metabolism as a whole can never be at equilibrium (otherwise the cell is dead !) but I wonder whether a few reactions in the cell could be at chemical equilibrium at a given point of ...
6
votes
1answer
153 views

Why does radiation sickness cause hair to fall out?

As I understand it, radiation poisoning (acute radiation syndrome) is fatal because the radiation kills cells. However, why do victims experience hair loss at such an early stage in the process?
0
votes
1answer
228 views

Calcium for Humans: Supplements vs Fortified Sources

I am intolerant to meat and milk products, but purely natural foods don't contain enough calcium for the Recommended Daily Intake. Links 2 to 4 (but NOT 1) avouch a correlation between calcium ...
1
vote
1answer
494 views

What is 'calcium conductance'?

What is the meaning of calcium conductance in ion channels. I encountered this in the following text: It was established that the µ and δ opioid receptors open potassium channels, which results ...
3
votes
1answer
908 views

What happens when cells in your body run out of telomeres?

In my biology book I read about an experiment where the genes encoding telomerase were 'knocked out', but they could still live a normal life and no adverse effects were noticed until the 6th ...
2
votes
2answers
117 views

How did viruses learn to utilize the workings of a cell?

This is my first post here, so excuse me for its simplicity. Viruses can infiltrate a cell, overtake it and multiply. It has projecting fibers whose ends are shaped as kind of a "key" to a mobile ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Are mature RBCs prokaryotic?

Mature mammalian RBCs have all the characteristics of a eukaryotic cell except that they don't have a nucleus, they don't have any cell organelles. Does this mean that RBCs are classified as ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

histamine inter-cellular and cytoplasmic binding site

I noticed that HRH (histamine receptor) has an inter-cellular and cytoplasmic binding site of anti-histamines which are equal in binding energy. Does anyone know what is the function of the well ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Why does the heart use lipids (and not glucose)?

Fetal hearts use glucose as their primary metabolic substrate. Adult hearts use free fatty acids, which are less efficient (require more $O_2$ to synthesize the same amount of ATP); however, during ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Adaptability in immune system

I read somewhere that recently some people are trying to use harmless bacteria that live symbiotically in humans to express some portions of antigens of the harmful ones. Some people have raised ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is there a free alternative to Gelcompar for comparing banding patterns across multiple gels?

In order to run my microbial community samples from my experiments through DGGE, I was required to use multiple gels. Thus it is necessary to compare banding patterns across more than one gel. ...
0
votes
2answers
158 views

Introductory biology text for an outsider

I'm a maths major and I have an interest in learning biology. I know very, very little; I know how babies are made and that's about it. Could anyone recommend a stimulating text to read for it's own ...

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