5
votes
2answers
276 views

Can someone who cannot talk still whistle?

Can someone who has a damaged larynx, which does not allow them to talk, still create a tune when they whistle? I know that the larynx is what allows a person to manipulate their pitch and volume, ...
1
vote
1answer
280 views

Blast output - program to count the number of hits [duplicate]

I have to use the old version of Blast (not Blast+) to compare DNA sequences and I have to know the number of all hits. They are not given in the header and I have to know them for many many of blast ...
2
votes
0answers
138 views

Are there sterilisation methods that do not denature proteins as heat does?

Context: Most countries require milk to be sterilised through radiation or heat to remove possible harmful bacteria. Both of these processes denature the proteins in the milk (ref). Are there methods ...
6
votes
2answers
67 views

Can molecular genetics make a boolean variable from a continuous variable?

In the same kind of idea than this question. Gene expression are regulated through complex interactions. The concentration of enhancers and repressors is an important aspect that dictate the level of ...
3
votes
2answers
60 views

Are restriction enzymes active at −20 °C?

I have digested my DNA with NotI enzyme and put it in the −20 °C freezer without heat inactivating it. Can restriction enzymes work at −20 °C? Should I expect STAR activity?
14
votes
2answers
2k views

How do birds deal with their eyes drying out at high speeds?

My eyes tear up when cycling at 15 mph, which is nothing compared to bird airspeeds. Do birds continuously produce lots of tears and blink a lot, or do the eyes self-moisturize from the inside ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Explaining natural selection in moth [closed]

Industrial melanism is an example of natural selection. Can it be considered as a evolution due to anthropogenic action?
8
votes
2answers
262 views

Are unilaterally deaf people able to determine where sound comes from?

My question is on people deafened in one ear, but normal hearing in the other. Time and level differences between the two ears are only part of how the human body can localize the source of the sound....
2
votes
1answer
113 views

Edman method to identify peptides with Phenylisothiocyanate (PTH)

We all know that in this method the PTH reacts with the first amino acid (aa) from the N-terminal to the peptide and separates from it giving PTH-aa so that we can know the amino acids sequence in the ...
3
votes
1answer
49 views

Obvious phenotypic inheritance markers in humans

In humans, are there phenotypic markers that prove parenthood? For example, if mother and father have <trait characteristic> (let's say, specific ear lobe ...
17
votes
2answers
2k views

What's the difference between male and female?

As long as we only look at humans the differences are clear: males have chromosomes XY, produce sperm and don't get pregnant. Females have chromosomes XX, produce egg cells and bear babies. But when ...
2
votes
1answer
790 views

Why does gaining a hydrogen in biology considered reducing a molecule? [closed]

I've learnt in chemistry that gaining electrons means reduction, while losing electrons means oxidation. But why is it in Biology textbooks I sometimes come across the term gaining hydrogen??
3
votes
4answers
998 views

Why autosomal trisomy has more adverse effects than sex choromosome monosomy or trisomy?

Autosomal Trisomy syndromes are usually lethal but sex chromosome number related abnormalities do not lead to that much fatality. why?
2
votes
0answers
76 views

How did birds become so intelligent?

I have seen a Discovery Channel video of a bird throwing stones in a pot to raise the water level so it is able to reach and drink it. A similar experiment in this paper from Current Biology shows ...
7
votes
2answers
137 views

How animals know which is carnivorous and herbivorous?

Deer ran away from tiger or cheetah, but not from giraffe or zebra. where did deer learn this? How animals know which is carnivorous and herbivorous?
4
votes
1answer
410 views

What are the lower and upper hearing limits of the human ear?

I am looking for the loudness limits, expressed in decibels, for the human ear. Google or Wikipedia giving me only frequency limit human ear can receive, but I cannot find mention about the decibel ...
14
votes
1answer
237 views

Help identifying what this is in Crayfish gills?

this is my first time posting here. I was in my Zoology lab doing a dissection on a Crayfish when I noticed these hairlike structures within the gills. They were very "snappy" and fine, and would ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Are Whales More Intelligent Than Humans?

Are Whales smarter than Humans? Their brain size leads me to think so.
6
votes
1answer
185 views

What are the positive effects of wrongful antibiotic use on a viral infection?

I categorically accept that bacteria differ from viruses; so antibiotics DON'T help in viral infections. I also read this and this; so no need to explain this. I've read about the negative effects (eg ...
0
votes
0answers
309 views

Barr body Giemsa staining

Why not all the female cheek cells show Barr Bodies when stained with Giemsa stain?? only 30 to 40 % female cells showed Barr Bodies . Why?
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Comparing gene expression levels between control and disease at different time points

I have a data set with expression levels of a list of genes, measured in replicate at two different time points between two groups; a control group and a disease group. I want to identify the changes ...
1
vote
1answer
542 views

What is the relationship between radiation and evolution?

There is always a certain amount of background radiation present, for example due to ionizing radiation from the sun and other stars. Also certain materials like granite may emit relatively large ...
6
votes
2answers
103 views

What level of cellular radiation is harmful for humans?

What level of radiation at the frequencies used by the cellular network(1-2 Ghz) is harmful for human health?
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Are both (partial) copies of DNA transcribed in S and G2 phases of cell cycle?

For a little less than half the cell cycle, a significant number of genes are represented twice (just before dividing). Does the cell differentiate between these DNA in any way or are transcription ...
6
votes
5answers
310 views

Is the amount of blood that flows through every vein and artery per minute really a constant?

I was listening lectures from Mark Saltzman via Open Yale Courses. Now, if I did not understand him wrong, he said that the amount of blood that travels through every vein and artery in our bodies per ...
5
votes
1answer
173 views

Can reptiles digest grains?

As a caretaker of a turtle, I sometimes struggle understanding the logic behind the inclusion of corn, soybean, and wheat meals in reptile food, such ingredients seem truly aberrant from what a ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Immediate Early Genes during sleep

In Neuroscience 3rd ed by Bear et al. on page 607, immediate early genes are described as related to changing synaptic strength, yet have decreased expression during sleep. The explanation given is ...
2
votes
2answers
67 views

C. elegans are either male or hermaphrodites, but why aren't there any females?

From my understanding C. elegans are mainly hermaphrodites but are occasionally males to increase genetic variation. Why is it that random females aren't born instead to achieve he same goal (genetic ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between myopia and hyperopia?

In myopia the lens is bending the light too much even in the most relaxed state. Thus the image is produced in front of the retina. If the object comes closer the lens just adjusts a bit less than a ...
2
votes
0answers
123 views

Is there a database of known riboswitches?

I'm looking for sequences and annotations of known riboswitches, but so far I haven't found a resource that actually fulfills my requirements. The best database I found so far is Rfam, which has ...
4
votes
1answer
77 views

Can anti-aging cream work?

I have a friend who told me that anti-aging cream cannot work to reduce wrinkles as it only penetrates x amount of skin layers and can never make a long term effect. Me not knowing much about how ...
5
votes
1answer
81 views

Stretching and compressing bones

The Young's modulus of elasticity when a bone is stretched is : 16×109 and when it is compressed, it is 9×109 N/m2. That means, change in length will be more if you compress a bone as compared to ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

How does a sperm cell die?

What causes an animal sperm cell to die? Does it die somehow from being outside its original environment? I've studied the Wikipedia page on sperm and I see a lot of information on what makes up a ...
3
votes
1answer
111 views

Proteins in Milk, Oat , Eggs and Soy

I have read that there are proteins in oat which are similar to those in soy, milk and eggs. I know nothing about biochemistry, and I'm struggling to decipher the info i find.. the closest Ive got to ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Can someone link me to resources on the efficiency of sticky end ligation?

I really would like to know if sticky end ligation could potentially be performed with very high efficiency, and which factors influence that. However, I can't find any papers on the subject, even ...
3
votes
1answer
76 views

Reconstruction of wildlife distribution based on poorly-sampled data [closed]

cross-posted to Signal Processing, Cross Validated, and World Building Stack Exchange Hi, I thought I'd also put this here in case there are any field biologists with ideas on the matter. Problem: ...
0
votes
0answers
83 views

Medical Uses of toxic venom

One interesting thing I recently learned is that venom has medical uses that can actually save lives! But from what I see so far this either applies to venoms from creatures that are not fatal to ...
3
votes
1answer
322 views

What happens to the precursor protein's signal sequence after it is cleaved?

Where does this signal sequence "go" after it has been cleaved by signal peptidase and what is its next function?
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Why is the opposite of plantar flexion called “dorsiflexion”?

Why is the action of flexing the foot so that the toes move anteriorly/superiorly (i.e. in the direction opposite that which they move during plantar flexion) described as "dorsiflexion"? In the same ...
0
votes
0answers
93 views

Why does a human's field of view narrow when moving faster?

A relative of mine is a driving instructor and he regularly likes to bring up that the field of view narrows noticeably when driving at higher speeds. Is this true, why is this so and does this apply ...
5
votes
1answer
145 views

Telomerase as cancer target

There are a lot of publications, starting from 2000, about using telomerase for targeting cancer cells (it is upregulated in more than 80-90% of tumor cells). Specifically using its promoter (hTERT). ...
2
votes
0answers
59 views

CRISPR Knock in

Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, it is possible that after inducing a DSB with the Cas9 endonuclease guided with an RNA designed by the user and using a template DNA, get a desired Knock-In (KI) by ...
1
vote
1answer
221 views

Hydrogen peroxide decomposition and catalase uses [closed]

All google searches have simply returned more info on catalase. I'm looking for a catalyst that isn't found inside living organisms which can break down H2O2. Looking for any resources to look at, or ...
4
votes
1answer
63 views

By what mechanism does Risperidone swell breast tissue?

There has been much talk of the anti-psychotic drug Rispeirdone causing un-natural breast tissue growth as well as galactorhea (milk production). Especially in young men and boys. What is the ...
9
votes
3answers
428 views

How can I align more than 2 sequences locally?

ClustalW and Omega of EBI and Blast of NCBI, both globally align sequences. Smith waterman of EBI aligns sequences locally, but works with just two sequences. How can I align more than 2 sequences ...
4
votes
0answers
118 views

Are there any de-novo genome assembly programs for HADOOP?

I have access to a small (approx 20 nodes) cluster that has HADOOP running on it, and I need to do some de-novo genome assembly. I'd like to ask is anyone knows of any program that can do this on a ...
9
votes
1answer
2k views

Why are butterflies drinking blood?

According to this video, butterflies sometimes drink blood. Do they have the organs necessary to digest blood? I thought they eat only salts and nectar, which are easy to digest compared to proteins. ...
2
votes
0answers
25 views

What is the role of RAGEs?

According to articles I read, AGEs (advanced glycation end products) activate RAGEs (receptors for AGEs). This activation increases the ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels in the cells. 2003 - ...
7
votes
2answers
334 views

Do butterflies see behind?

Butterflies, like many other insects, understand that I am getting near from behind. How do they feel this - through vision, hearing, or some other sense?
2
votes
0answers
33 views

Is (are) there any crucial gene(s) for the formation of flower in flowering plants? [closed]

I am interested in qualitative (flowers of some plants have petal or sepal, but some plants have not) and quantitative (number of flowers of plants) differences between flowers of different plants. ...

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