0
votes
1answer
143 views

Layman definition of genetic polymorphism?

I am reading an article about Genetic Polymorphism and there are lines in the article about genetic polymophism that I don't quite understand like. In this area, there are six different chemotypes ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

explanation of meaning of high-throughput

Almost all of the papers about bioinformatics, I faced with the high-throughput word, but I could not find any explanation about it (I think it is so easy to understand and thats why anyone explains ...
4
votes
1answer
31 views

What's the maximum pressure inside a bombardier beetle?

This question got me wondering about the pressure inside a bombardier beetle. Lots of articles mention pressure, but don't specify the amount of it: One study records the velocity of the spray to ...
3
votes
1answer
726 views

meaning of the “reads” keyword in terms of RNA-seq or next generation sequencing

I'm an undergraduate student at computer science and currently, I'm interested in bioinformatics. Today, I've started to read a paper about clustering and classification of non-coding RNAs can be ...
3
votes
1answer
36 views

Telomere and its effect on aging

The cloned sheep, Dolly, was said to have died very soon because the cells used to create it were taken from an adult sheep with an aged telomere. Why doesn't this happen with humans? Why aren't we ...
2
votes
0answers
41 views

What is the maximal insert length for PCR based homologous recombination in S. cerevisae

I would like to insert a 6 kbp construct, which I have on a plasmid into the genome of S. cerevisiae. This plasmid was originally constructed to integrate at the HIS locus via homologous recombination ...
5
votes
1answer
100 views

How does the value of K determine number of local optima in NK model?

BACKGROUND The NK model of fitness landscape considers N states which can interact with K other states. For example N is the total number of genes in a haploid genome and K is the number of other ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

What is our skin made up of?

Again, it is a basic question. What is our skin made up of? is it made up of many cells arranged in a systematic way or is it just like any layer say of a book?? what is the difference? where is the ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

What network motifs or other mechanisms can make the expression of a gene invariable to the environment?

Next to double positive feedback loops and chromatin modification, which other mechanisms can make a gene susceptible to a certain environment in one cell-type but not in another?
2
votes
0answers
102 views

Sensitivity of eyes to flashing lights

My eyes are very sensitive to flashing lights - for example I'm always the first person to notice that a fluorescent tube is about to fail because I see it flickering when other people can't. When I'...
2
votes
1answer
388 views

Optical density machine name

What is the name of the machine used to measure optical density? We used it in a lab but I can't remember what they called it.
90
votes
5answers
11k views

Does DNA have the equivalent of IF-statements, WHILE loops, or function calls? How about GOTO?

Does DNA have anything like IF-statements, GOTO-jumps, or WHILE loops? In software development, these constructs have the following functions: IF-statements: An IF statement executes the code in a ...
2
votes
1answer
143 views

Why do Lapidaria margaretae look like stones?

Previous Research I stumbled across a trending reddit post "Lapidaria margaretae looks like stones" (as of 3rd Februrary 2015); but I could not find discussions as to reasons behind why. Question/s ...
4
votes
5answers
571 views

If a gene is located on the X chromosome, does that mean males are never heterozygous for these genes?

As said in the title I am a little confused on the idea of traits located on the sex chromosomes. The example we worked on in class was haemophilia, a recessive trait located on the X chromosome. Does ...
2
votes
1answer
32 views

What mechanisms exist for the excision of specific sequences from DNA?

I already know about recombinases (specifically excisionases), but was wondering if there were other mechanisms present.
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Can life forms exist from simple structures not made of the four bases? [closed]

I understand that all life forms on the planet are made from adenine, gauatine, cytosine and thymine, which chemically joined together to form RNA or DNA (correct me if I'm wrong). This goes on to ...
4
votes
1answer
151 views

Fixation rate at neutral loci

It is a classical result that the expected time for a neutral mutation to occur and to get fixed is $2 N \mu \frac{1}{2N} = \mu$, where $N$ is the population size and $\mu$ is the neutral mutation ...
5
votes
1answer
164 views

What are the total number of action potentials in the human brain?

Is there an approximate figure of the total number of action potentials in the human brain? It's my understanding that there are ~ 60 billion neurons in the brain with ~ 100 trillion connections ...
16
votes
1answer
1k views

How Do White Blood Cells Learn? Or Do They?

So I get the concept that a vaccine is a weakened form of a virus so that the body can "learn" to fight it and make a person immune to that disease, but how exactly does this learning take place? What ...
3
votes
1answer
185 views

Do our ears or brains gradually adapt to noise pollution?

Having lived in various places all over the world for the past 9 years of my life, one thing stood out to me throughout this time, and now in particular. From a quiet place on the countryside in ...
1
vote
0answers
408 views

Does malaria have a reservoir host?

Can warm blooded vertebrates other than humans act as reservoir hosts for malaria parasites? I'm mainly interested in Plasmodium vivax and possible reservoir hosts in the wider area of Europe/ Eurasia....
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Find the probability of Filium (child) that are dark (and) heterozygote [duplicate]

Two mice are crossed and both are dark and heterozygote. Find the probability of their filium(children) dark (and) heterozygote in F1. Here's what our teacher explained: I don't understand. I ...
3
votes
0answers
58 views

Degree of dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster

In this paper the authors state that the dosage compensation seen in Drosophila is approximately twofold, but they do not provide any source or numbers (as far as I can see) for this. What is the mean ...
5
votes
1answer
167 views

(Why) are polar bears more common in Labrador than in southern Greenland?

The Labrador Sea is between Greenland, Labrador, and Qikiqtaaluk: Map source. A Greenlandic source on polar bears states: In Greenland the polar bear lives and breeds in the northernmost parts ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

Electroporation of one-cell embryo?

Would electroporation be successful on a one/two-celled mouse embryo? If it would, what buffer could be used and what percentage of cells would be viable? Thank you.
1
vote
2answers
227 views

The Ancient Kingdom of Monera

Why exactly were bacteria and archaea kingdoms separated from the now unused kingdom of Monera? Aren't they the same? They are both prokaryotes, so what is the difference?
5
votes
2answers
309 views

How can E. coli proliferate so rapidly?

The E. coli has a genome with approximately 5×106 bp. The main DNA polymerase involved in its chromosome duplication (DNA pol III , the one with highest processivity) can polymerize ~103 nucleotides ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Are there multiple meanings to “clone” as in “clone a gene”?

I originally thought that cloning a gene meant to put it into bacteria and have them express it. But sometimes I see it used and it seems like it's just a synonym for "identify the sequence and/or ...
7
votes
1answer
4k views

Are all dinosaur bones radioactive?

I watching some TV program some time ago and a guy in it mentioned that when-ever museums display real dinosaur bones (as opposed to a replica) the bones are painted over with a lead paint, because ...
3
votes
1answer
24 views

Can virus resistance be acquired through generational exposure?

If I have a squash plant that has a mosaic virus of some kind, and I breed its descendants (via seed) for generations, each with exposure to the same virus, will future generations be likely to ...
6
votes
0answers
69 views

How to tell if a beverage will hydrate or dehydrate? [duplicate]

Beverages of any type generally contain some measure of water. However, in the case of some liquids, the non-water components take more water from the human body to filter out than the water contained ...
0
votes
0answers
117 views

What is the probe that absorbs at 450nm in the presence of NADH in this assay?

The colorimetric assays by Biovision and Sigma Aldrich seem to utilise a probe that binds to or reacts with NADH in order to cause absorbance at 450nm which can then be quantified by a ...
3
votes
1answer
127 views

Why do haemophillic females $X^hX^h$ die before birth?

I just came across a statement in my book , while reading genetics, that haemophiliac females do not survive till birth (the reason not mentioned here why) . Before posting this question here I ...
2
votes
0answers
68 views

How do I identify the protein with the highest Disulfide bond density? i.e protein with highest ratio of Disulphide bonds per Peptide bond? [closed]

I want to list all proteins in the protein database and list them by the ratio of number of disulphide bonds per peptide bond. I am not particular about the reliability of identification of ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Primer design for HLA locus

i have designed primers for HLA locus DPA1(exon 2 region) based on Real-Time PCR (qPCR) Primer Design guidelines. primer will start from intron regions to cover full exonic region. F-...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

Nutritious protein substance for vitamin enhanced crop?

I am not a bio or science major, but we have a subject, like an elective on biotechnology and we were tasked to think of a product that hasn't been invented yet. My groupmates and I thought of a ...
1
vote
3answers
555 views

What is the basic structure of the nuclear lamina

What gives the nucleus its shape is a mesh of intermediate filaments called the nuclear lamina. It forms an interface between the chromosomes and the inside of the nuclear envelope. If these ...
1
vote
1answer
655 views

How would i describe a Cladogram as paragraph? [closed]

I have this paragraph that i have halfway finished, but i do not know what to put in the spaces. A Cladogram is a branching diagram that represents the proposed phylogeny or evolution of a species ...
3
votes
0answers
80 views

How we share pain?

When somebody else tells me about his or her itching or pain in some specific body part I sometimes begin to feel similar feelings. I can think of about three explanations: I feel pain all over my ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Why AZT is selective towards HIV and doesn't impair human DNA replication?

I've found this article, which is a very old one (from the time when nucleoside analogs where researched as a possible way to prevent replication of virus genetic material, before the HIV epidemics). ...
4
votes
1answer
108 views

Do cell membranes have more phospholipids in one layer than in the other?

Assuming the cell membrane to have a spherical shape, geometry tells us that the area of the inner leaflet is smaller than the area of the outer due to the difference in radius between them. Does this ...
2
votes
1answer
22 views

Are the proteolytic enzymes in syconiums and nettles identical to those in rennet?

I would like to compare rennet capability under various conditions. The issue is, I don't want to use calf rennet, but I can't figure out if nettle and syconium, which also coagulate milk, contain ...
1
vote
1answer
338 views

Why sigmoid curves appear in quantitative analysis of many biological phenomena? [closed]

I know two examples: 1-The binding of hemoglobin to oxygen (binding of oxygen to one site of hemoglobin induces conformational changes which increase the affinity of the other sites for oxygen - the ...
-3
votes
1answer
577 views

Why do humans need a heart? [closed]

When I looked up the function of the heart, it says the heart pumps blood throughout the body. But the blood is already throughout the body, as it is recycled back to the heart. It is a chick-egg ...
2
votes
4answers
5k views

Why are there both stop and start codons?

Based on my understanding from wikipedia, there is the (RNA) start codon AUG and the stop codons UAA, UGA, UAG. AUG can also encode Methionine, I'm assuming if it appears in the middle of a mRNA ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Two heterozygote mice for skin color are reproduced. Find the probability that in 3 children 2 will be dark and one white

Two heterozygote mice for skin color are reproduced. Black is dominant to white color. Find the probability that in 3 children 2 will be dark and one white. How did you do the ordering. Well I found ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

interpreting enhancer and promoter regions of a target gene

I am reading a paper which talks about promoter/enhancer regions of certain protein coding genes. These genes are for which evidence points to having strong MEF2 transcription factor binding sites. ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

how food moves in horizontal coils of small intestines [duplicate]

This is a very very basic question, and I am looking at it more from point of view of physics. The small intestine is a highly coiled structure, which means it has horizontal coils as well. I can ...
1
vote
0answers
10 views

Plants and animals ability to survive polypoidy conditions [duplicate]

In mammals the condition polyploidy produce something euphemistically termed "general developmental disruption" ,practically speaking this means system meltdown which happens very quickly. There is ...
3
votes
0answers
42 views

Protein-Bound Drugs in Kwashiorkor

Kwashiorkor is characterised by decreased serum protein (including serum albumin) due to poor dietary protein intake. What is the effect of this lowered serum protein on highly-protein-bound drugs? ...

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