7
votes
1answer
141 views

Making penicillin using animals - specifically, a goat

In the scifi novel Lucifer's Hammer, one of the characters (a biologist, if I remember correctly) finds himself in a post-apocalyptic world and tries to make penicillin to save his own life. To do ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

3D models of adult male brain in the Blender software? Any open-sourced version for research?

I am trying to find 3D model of brains. I am particularly interested in adult-male -brains in Blender-model. I could find such 3D models of brains for sale here but because I am researching I would ...
7
votes
2answers
3k views

Is nicotine toxic to humans?

More specifically, is nicotine in the concentrations that smokers receive when smoking cigarettes toxic? I know that in great enough concentrations it can be toxic (but then, so can just about ...
5
votes
1answer
99 views

What types of archaea have been found in animals?

I am curious as to the species or "types" of archaea that have been found to reside within animals symbiotically. One of the only ones I can think of off the top of my head are methanogens, which live ...
5
votes
1answer
679 views

How are lysosome membranes protected from the attack of hydrolases?

Lysosomes are a bit like the suicidal bags of cells. They help to clean cells, have an acidic pH and contain a large number of hydrolyzing enzymes. But why don't these hydrolyzing enzymes attack ...
4
votes
1answer
177 views

Is cell senescence in culture comparable to that in vivo?

A cell is 'senescent' when is has permanently left the cell-cycle. This can be caused by stresses, or by reaching the 'Hayflick limit' (the cell has reached its replicative lifespan, as defined by its ...
3
votes
3answers
428 views

What is a good list of unsolved protein structures?

I'm trying to get a list of unique soluble structured proteins that don't have a solved structure. That is, they aren't the usual membrane proteins or some derivative of another protein. Things that ...
7
votes
1answer
86 views

Do antisense transcripts have different names than their sense strand transcripts?

I want to find which genes in the human genome can potentially be complementary to a transcript that could act as antisense transcript inhibtion? Are cis-NATs (naturally occuring anti-sense ...
7
votes
1answer
105 views

What happens when we know that there is something that we forgot but we can't remember what it was?

I think it happens for everyone that sometimes we go to a room and forget why we went there. Is there any research or article on this?
4
votes
2answers
98 views

Low temperature PCR

We're trying to do emulsion PCR using HA-coated polystyrene beads and we're noticing that the beads are seeing drastic issues with thermal degradation above 90C. As PCR has an unfortunate requirement ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

Colonial Cells Demonstrating Cell Specialization

Are there any living examples of cellular colonies demonstrating very primitive cellular specialization? If so, what do we know about how they assimilate? How independent are the individual cells ...
1
vote
1answer
226 views

Would two species of yeast with similar genome sizes have the same number of genes or chromosomes?

Similar organisms generally have similar genome sizes. Given this, would two species of yeast have the same number of genes and chromosomes? Edit: Fixed with thanks to @daniel-standage
6
votes
1answer
113 views

Bicoid regulation of hunchback

I'm learning about development via the example of Drosophila embryogenesis. I understand that bicoid regulates hunchback, among other genes. My question whether the regulation is direct or indirect? ...
1
vote
3answers
206 views

Action Potential Distribution On Synapses

This is a biology+physics question. Since there is no biology section, I am asking here. In brain, when a neuron reaches to threshold value, it fires an action potential. In most graphics, that is ...
4
votes
1answer
191 views

What is ear wax?

A human, at some time in life or the other, must clear the auditory canal. This is usually achieved using soft-cotton buds, or such similar device. Where does this wax come from? What purpose does ...
3
votes
2answers
228 views

Does the speed of electrical impulses through neurones decrease with age?

From what I read on the NatGeo app, it stated that the speed of the electrical impulses that are sent by a neurone will be approximately 332 kilometers per hour. Will the speed of this electrical ...
6
votes
2answers
555 views

Can female Drosophila melanogaster lay eggs without males?

Can female Drosophila melanogaster lay egg without males? I maintain our lab stock but find a line that seems to have all females (or all males). In the vial, I see some eggs laid, but the flies ...
12
votes
1answer
296 views

Can DNA act as a translation substrate?

I get conflicting answers. One would think if it was true, it would be rather seminal and widely known. There are papers from Khorana[1], Holland[2], and Bretscher[3] (late 60s) that suggest that it ...
9
votes
1answer
441 views

What is the modern state of the theory of evolution?

When I studied biology at my medical school we used to learn things about a century old: the famous Darwin's voyage on "Beagle" to the Galapagos Islands, the classical triad of his Theory of ...
5
votes
2answers
153 views

Analysing the results of real-time PCR

I want to evaluate the level of gene expression by real-time PCR. I have five controls that are "clinically" the same. I calculated the "fold change" of the target gene regarding each control. What ...
4
votes
0answers
99 views

Comparative cost of RNA-seq vs sequencing full length cDNAs

I am in the process of assembling and annotating the genome of a non-model organism, using almost exclusively short read (paired-end Illumina) data. Throughput is one obvious benefit of these data ...
7
votes
2answers
198 views

What measures are commonly used for the complexity of an organism?

I'm aware of measures like number of distinct cell types being used as a measurement of complexity in biology, for example in the G-value paradox. But this doesn't really help for unicellular ...
5
votes
3answers
245 views

Is Leptin Stimulated by Insulin Alone?

What is the mechanism of insulin stimulation in the human body? Is leptin release stimulated by circulating insulin directly? Which other factors are involved in the level of insulin release? My goal ...
4
votes
3answers
187 views

Good book on Origin of Life [closed]

What is a book that goes into reasonable detail (but isn't textbook-level technical) about the origin of earth and in particular the origin of life on earth? Something intended for a broad audience, ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Is a minimum size/complexity necessary for an organism to exhibit territoriality?

A follow-up to Is territoriality only the domain of the male of a species? I've seen a large butterfly chase a different kind of butterfly around - it may, or may not have been territoriality. Is ...
13
votes
5answers
4k views

Can any protein be phosphorylated?

I am working with an Arabidopsis mutant with an F-box protein knocked out. It has been shown that F-box proteins targets must first be phosphorylated (Skowrya et al., 1997). I have heard of ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

HDL- and LDL-cholesterol

Why exactly are HDL-cholesterols good for us and LDL-cholesterols not. I know LDL-cholesterols cause Atherosclerosis and that HDL-cholesterols removes the excess of LDL-cholesterols, but from a ...
2
votes
1answer
61 views

Is it more likely to develop a throat-ache at night?

I have noticed that I rarely develop phlemmy throat-aches in the daytime, but often notice them after I have been sleeping. Is this a recognised phenomenon? Could it be because viruses or bacteria ...
5
votes
3answers
127 views

Does the entire surface of the earth contain organisms?

Does the entire surface of the earth contain organisms? My teacher mentioned that in some parts of the earth, there aren't any organism. Is this true? Thanks in advance.
8
votes
1answer
231 views

Do antigens protrude through the capsule/slime layer in prokaryotic organisms where these features are present?

In prokaryotic organisms that have a slime layer or capsule, do intrinsic/extrinsic proteins and other molecules that could be used as antigens protrude through the capsule? I assume that they ...
7
votes
1answer
4k views

Why is Hydrofluoric Acid so dangerous if its a weak acid?

I've read that Hydrofluoric acid (HF) is extremely dangerous to touch, but what exactly makes it so toxic? It's weak acid ($K_a = 7.2 \times 10^{–4}$) and dissociates approximately 1/1000 as much as ...
3
votes
1answer
349 views

Troubleshooting bioconjugates migration in a SDS-PAGE gel?

We do a lot of bioconjugation chemistry (click chemistry in particular but also NHS and Maleimide chemistries). Our method to valid the conjugation reactions have been to use SDS-PAGE gels followed ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

How does a single-stranded RNA bind to a double-stranded DNA to form a “triplex structure”?

If you have a single-stranded RNA that is complementary to a double-stranded DNA, how do they interact to form what my prof. calls a "triplex structure"? e.g. ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

In a human, what non-germline cells have the highest/lowest mass?

I'm just curious which cells are largest/smallest in the human body other than sperm/ova.
6
votes
1answer
861 views

How do neurons form new connections in brain plasticity?

I've been reading about brain plasticity and how the brain can "rewire" itself. One of the things that is not clear to me - how neurons can establish new connections. Does this rewiring mean that ...
3
votes
1answer
447 views

Do adipose cells divide in adults?

I have a dim recollection of having heard that when humans gain weight, adipose cells just get larger, rather than dividing. True?
2
votes
1answer
123 views

Where does an organism store reserves of amino acids?

Where does an organism store reserves of the amino acids it needs to build various proteins it needs -- in the liver ? in the blood ? in every cell ? Thanks
1
vote
2answers
264 views

Do any cells change in size or mass as mammals grow?

That is to say, are there cells that, between infancy and adulthood, get larger? Or is all growth done entirely via cell division? I'm wondering if it is safe to assume that the approximate number ...
0
votes
2answers
379 views

Why do living organisms replicate itself or procreate

Why do living organisms spontaneously replicate itself or "procreate" (my understanding is that it does). From a uni-cellular and micro-organism point of view. Is there some sort of stimulant in the ...
6
votes
1answer
91 views

What is the total number of rounds of cleavage during mammalian embryonic development?

That for frog is 12, but what about mammalian embryos? I cannot find the exact number anywhere.
4
votes
2answers
708 views

Why is Botulinum toxin the most potent poison known?

Botulinum toxin (trade name Botox) inhibits acetylcholine release in neurons and causes botulism, an acute paralytic disease which leads to nerve degeneration and takes a long time to recover. I've ...
18
votes
2answers
3k views

Do gene expression levels necessarily correspond to levels of protein activation?

I have seen a lot of research into molecular mechanisms of diseases/phenotypes use measures of RNA as a 'proxy' for the level of protein available in the cell. Is this actually valid? My problem ...
6
votes
1answer
7k views

Will a bone marrow transplant change one's blood type?

Will a bone marrow transplant change one's blood type? Or is the donor blood type matched with the person before transplant?
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Interpreting SNP-in-gene associations from GWAS studies

For most SNPs identified in GWAS studies, is the underlying assumption that if it is indeed associated with a phenotype (and lets assume its associated because it affects protein function), that you ...
2
votes
3answers
528 views

Is there such thing as “half-life” of dopamine?

If a dopamine is released at T=0 and binds to receptor D2, what determines the time when the concentration of this neurotransmitter bound to the receptor reaches half of the original concentration? In ...
9
votes
2answers
327 views

How is human biological clock modelled in modern science?

Im an engineer by education and i program a lot, so the question sounds weird to people from other disciplines. Im trying to better understand the human biological clock. Yet i do not really know ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

Nucleotide frequencies in Kimura's two-parameter model

Here's an excerpt about Kimura's two-parameter model from Felsenstein's Inferring Phylogenies: "The model is symmetrical, and one can immediately see that, after enough time has elapsed, it ...
7
votes
2answers
77 views

What is the benefit of near-emptying the bloodstream in the mammalian kidney?

In the normal function of the kidney, the bloodstream is near emptied of fluids as it moves through the glomerulus, in which glomerular filtrate is formed. As it proceeds through the Nephron, a ...
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Have there been any experiments that duplicate chromosome copies from 23*2 to 23*3 or 23*4?

Deinococcus radiodurans is an amazing bacterium with a fantastic survival rate. It can survive to high doses of radiation, in a complete vacuum and in hydrochloric acid. How does this bacterium ...
3
votes
0answers
263 views

Why does vision go blurry after microscope use, and how to prevent it? [closed]

After using a binocular microscope recently for about 20 minutes, my vision went blurry and for an hour or so it was much harder to read small text. This occurs to a (far) lesser extent whenever I use ...

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