7
votes
2answers
2k views

How do marine mammals control buoyancy?

Presumably, as a whale or seal dives, its lungs get compressed by the increasing water pressure, and it gets less buoyant. Under this model, for a given amount of air taken in at the surface, the ...
2
votes
1answer
148 views

Is there biological evidence for self-awareness in animals?

I am conducting an investigation into the topic of the intelligence of animals, in particular farm animals. I would be interested to hear a scientific and biologic perspective as to what is perceived ...
2
votes
2answers
26 views

Food allergen-related skin reactions and intestinal inflammation?

Are there any connections between food allergen-related skin reactions causing intestinal (or more broadly, gastrointestinal) generalized inflammation? If such a link exists, is it related to any of ...
5
votes
2answers
165 views

Why does caffeine give you so much energy, while being so low on calories?

There's definitely something I'm missing here. Since calories is a unit of measurement for energy, and caffeine seemingly gives you a lot, how can the labels on caffeinated products have such a low ...
0
votes
2answers
115 views

Are all single-celled organisms Bacteria?

I read that "Bacteria are one-celled organisms that can multiply by division", are all one-celled organisms bacteria or are there any more narrow definitions?
10
votes
2answers
3k views

Why did humans lose their fur?

The little amount of body hair humans have don't seem to be of much use for keeping warm. Our Simian cousins on the other hand sport thick furs. At which point during the species evolution and why ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

Why are the genomes of some trees so large?

For example, the current longest known genome belongs to a tree: http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-largest-genome-ever-sequenced-belongs-to-a-tree I have heard that this could potentially be ...
3
votes
2answers
173 views

Tracking of oxygen molecules in glucose oxidation

For this reaction, found in typical biochemistry textbook: $C_6H_{12}O_6 + 6O_2 \to 6CO_2 + 6H_2O$ I am interested in where do the oxygen atoms of $6O_2$ go. I think they go to $6H_2O$, but this is ...
2
votes
2answers
191 views

Local BLAST Copy Number per Hit

I generated a series of local BLAST databases using makeblastdb of metagenomic data and am searching for the presence of a particular gene. While I can do the normal BLAST analysis looking at e-values,...
3
votes
1answer
100 views

What information can Uniprot give me about phosphorylated forms of proteins?

I have a list of proteins formatted like this: ...
6
votes
1answer
46 views

Would constant light or fading light be registered as more wakefulness promoting by the Supra Chiasmatic Nucleus?

During the fall and winter season, a number of people are experiencing Seasonal Affective Disorder. One of the way it has traditionally been treated is with a dedicated lightbox - a very high ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

human immune system

The common cold and [some?] types of influenza are self-limiting. Some microorganisms cause self-limiting diarrhea. Is tuberculosis [potentially] self-limiting or not? To put it another way, suppose ...
7
votes
2answers
159 views

Evidence & discussions of hard polytomy

Phylogenetic trees with >2 branches on a node are polytomic, and polytomy can appear on trees for two reasons. Firstly a lack of information in the data prevents proper resolution within a clade, ...
6
votes
1answer
116 views

Nucleosome wrapping direction

Does anyone know which direction the nucleosomes are wrapped? I wonder: Relative to the B-DNA double helix twist direction (right-hand) Relative to the neighbor nucleosomes. Do they alternate to ...
1
vote
1answer
512 views

Hardy Weinberg problem help!

The three common genotypes at the hemoglobin locus have very different phenotypes: SS individuals suffer from severe anemia, AS individuals have a relatively mild form of anemia but are resistant to ...
3
votes
1answer
30 views

Ultra Pasteurization and Pasteurization

What is the effect of pasteurization and ultra-pasteurization on proteins, enzymes, and nutrients found in milk and other dairy products?
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Does the tannin level in plants go down or up after they die? Or does the tannin level stay the same regardless?

Does the tannin level in plants go down or up after they die? Or does the tannin level stay the same regardless? As they decay, do they release more tannins or does the production stop?
6
votes
1answer
138 views

Do blind people learn Braille equally fast as the sighted?

The visually deprived brain undergoes extensive remodeling due to cross-modal plasticity. This leads to increased areas of the cortex being available for other purposes such as tactile processing. Now ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Dawn simulation - does color change affect waking up?

just curious. Are there any works or research results related to the influence of light color used for dawn simulation? I mean those wake-up lights which try to simulate dawn to make waking up better ...
-1
votes
1answer
62 views

Why the name coined for MARKUP LANGUAGE for SBML? [closed]

I'm get the confusion about SYSTEM BIOLOGY filed. SBML is refer to as SYSTEM BIOLOGY MARKUP LANGUAGE why we should called as <...
5
votes
2answers
564 views

Synthesis of immunoglobulin Fab fragments: Where can I learn about Fab?

I wanted to know the chemical reaction involved in Fab synthesis. I looked everywhere for it. No luck. I know I will find it here. All I know for now is: Fab is a monovalent fragment that is ...
4
votes
1answer
89 views

Phospholipid movement in cell membranes

What causes phospholipids to flow so quickly in cell membranes? In Biology by Cambell et al. they state that a phospholipids can travel up to 2 micrometers per second. Is that a random movement or has ...
7
votes
1answer
119 views

How often does bacterial transformation happen?

I have been reading: M. Dröge, A. Pühler, W. Selbitschka, "Horizontal gene transfer among bacteria in terrestrial and aquatic habitats as assessed by microcosm and field studies", Biol. Fertil. ...
7
votes
1answer
234 views

How many eukaryotes are there on Earth?

I have been reading: William B. Whitman, David C. Coleman, and William J. Wiebe, "Prokaryotes: The unseen majority", Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, pp. 6578–6583, June 1998. [Full Text] [PDF] ...
14
votes
2answers
2k views

Why does sex last so long?

I wonder why (especially human) sex lasts longer than just a few seconds? My thought is that the shorter it takes a man to ejaculate, the lesser is the risk that he gets interrupted by a rival or a ...
1
vote
0answers
98 views

Effect of flask position in shaking incubator affects growth kinetics

During some cultivation experiments for my bachelor thesis I noticed that in liquid culture my bacteria (E. coli) grew differently, according to the position in the shaking incubator. Because the ...
14
votes
1answer
189 views

What is the biological age of grafted plants?

Suppose you graft a piece of an existing 'old' plant. Will it continue to grow having the same biological age as its parent? I.e., would it die at the same time as its parent? Or would the process of ...
14
votes
1answer
271 views

Effect of pupil responses on the electroretinogram

The electroretinogram (ERG) is a measure of electrical activity of the retina. It is typically recorded from the cornea with a wire electrode or gold-foil electrode. Generally, the the ERG is ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

What factors affect the likelihood of auditory stimuli causing arousal during sleep?

I've noticed that the sound of water drops makes me wake up from sleep but other more strong sounds don't make me wake up. I can't find anything about this. The only reason I can think of is maybe ...
5
votes
1answer
64 views

Does our nose detect only if there is change in odor?

If I enter a room with certain odor, I can sense the odor. However, if I stay there for some time I cannot sense it anymore. A new entrant to the room can still smell it or I have to leave the room ...
5
votes
1answer
314 views

How does anadromous fish physiology “know” to switch from salt to freshwater and back?

What mechanism allows anadromous fish (like salmon) to switch from salt to fresh water and back? How does the fish "know" to switch its physiology and do other fish possess the biochemical machinery ...
3
votes
1answer
70 views

What is the most recent well-attested common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans?

Humans and chimpanzees are related and thus have a most recent common ancestor. Of course pinning down this precise point is essentially impossible, so I'm interested in close ancestors of this most ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Physiological function of CFTR gene product? [duplicate]

I just need a clarification. If I am to talk about the physiological function of the CFTR gene product? Then what should I do research and talk about? The only physiological function that I can ...
6
votes
1answer
101 views

How can we calculate the minimum sustainable number of the panda population?

I have a degree in Biology so I'm a little embarrassed that I never learned this, but... How do we know 1600 Pandas isn't enough? I know that we have historical numbers (although I couldn't find ...
8
votes
0answers
106 views

How to define “Quasifixation” in continuous approximation of finite population?

Background Many models including the famous very first models derived by Sir Ronald Fisher in his early career, assume infinite population size. In an infinite population, an allele can rise in ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Any databases with AAMI ECG and ECHO?

There is no AAMI 12-lead ECG databases available online. All of them have problems. I and my friends finally finalised our tests with St Petersburg. It is not AAMI. So the next step is to search ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between embryology and developmental biology?

The question is quite explanatory in it self, I used to think that both are same but then find somewhere that embryology is a part of developmental biology, can somebody please elucidate?
10
votes
2answers
502 views

When writing about past research should I use the species name they employed or the modern version?

I am currently writing a literature review in which I am talking about the old research on the subject. When this research was carried out the species I'm talking about were classed under a different ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

How can histidine be classified both as positively charged and hydrophobic?

I saw the chart in this post Histidine aromaticity. Since I'm not allowed to comment and post a question instead of an answer, I have to ask my question in a separate thread. How can histidine be ...
-1
votes
1answer
129 views

Cells “grown in LB broth to an OD600nm” [closed]

Cells "grown in LB broth to an OD600nm" What does the OD stand for in this?
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Ways to measure effectiveness of a gene therapy trial?

I understand that Fluorescence in situ hybridisation can be used to measure the effectiveness of a gene therapy experiment/trial. But what are some other genetics techniques to measure the ...
0
votes
1answer
93 views

What impacts penetrance of Huntington's disease? [closed]

From Principles of Life by H. Craig Heller, David E. Sadava, Mary V. Price: From what I understand, Huntington's disease exhibits varying degrees of penetrance depending on how many times the ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

Is this a valid definition of independent assortment?

"Allelic combinations separate randomly. I.e. a parent might be Aa and Bb for two traits but that doesn't necessarily mean the gametes will strictly be AB or ab but any of a number of combinations. I....
0
votes
1answer
103 views

What is the progressive evolutionary advantage that leads to flying?

As far as I understand, all life started as non-flying and flying came about by natural selection. What is the evolutionary advantageous "path" to flying? Or is there something else to explain this?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What are non-heritable changes to genomes?

I am told that mutations are heritable changes to the genome. So this begs the question - what are non-heritable changes to genome?
2
votes
1answer
5k views

What is the difference between a phosphotransferase, a phosphatase, a phosphorylase and a kinase?

I've looked in several sources, but I'm still confused. This is what I have so far: A phosphotransferase catalyzes the addition of a phosphate group. A kinase is a type of phosphotransferase that ...
3
votes
1answer
903 views

Why is Cysteine and Tyrosine used to calculate a sequence isoelectric point?

Why are the amino acids - cysteine and tyrosine used in isoelectric point calculations for a protein sequence, yet neither of them are positively charged molecules? and are not used in net charge ...
0
votes
1answer
246 views

What are the structual differences between DNA and RNA? [closed]

How is the structure of DNA different from that of RNA?
3
votes
0answers
85 views

Does eating antacid (such as Magnesia) before meal have any impact on digestion? [closed]

During an anatomy lecture I heard of the importance of the acidity of gastric acid (e.g., killing microorganisms, dissolving food, being a factor for triggering further processes). If a healthy person ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

what is the role of ctab in plant dna extraction [duplicate]

i get good results for dna extraction by using ctab method but i doesn't have that proper information for role/function of ctab and other chemical. Anyone know, please briefly explain ......

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