16
votes
1answer
630 views

Additive genetic variance components from LMER in R

I've set up some dummy data in R which makes 40 genetically related lines, they are all siblings within a line so are genetically related by a factor of ½ thus additive genetic variance should be ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

Blood testing for chlamydia

I am working with the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. The main test for this species is the naat test, which is based on amplification. But I would like to know how the bacteria affects the blood ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

Can the spinal cord contain an “epileptic focus”?

I was wondering, is there a possibility of an something similar to an epileptic focus to exist within the spinal cord? Note I am using the terminology "epileptic" loosely here, principally for the ...
2
votes
3answers
225 views

What is Growing on These Tree Leaves? (Image)

I found a seemingly diseased tree when I was out playing tennis yesterday... What is growing on this tree leaf? Is this a disease? If so, is it contagious? I have zero knowledge in botany, but I'm ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Can stem cells from male convert to cells of female-only organs, and vice versa?

As we know, stem cells can convert to different cells of other organs, can male use their own stem cells to convert it into cells of female-only organs(and vice versa)?
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How to clean a dental pick which has not been used in a long time? [migrated]

I have a dental pick that has been lying around for a couple years which I haven't used. It has been on the floor and lying around nooks and crannies of drawers that haven't been really clean. I ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

Cesium-137 From Fukushima Meltdown

I've been reading up on the Fukushima nuclear meltdown and its effects it had on the environment. The iodine-131 initially released from the incident decayed after 8 days, but other isotopes such as ...
5
votes
1answer
194 views

How fast can a panda run?

Pandas are going extinct, mostly due to habitat destruction. This leads me to the question: How fast can an average adult panda run? (more specifically Giant Panda)
1
vote
0answers
12 views

How is “fine mapping of pelvic regulatory region” done in the stickleback PitX1 paper?

I'm working through this paper for a class. I'm a bit confused by the methods they used in one experiment. So the researchers are studying spine development in stickleback fish. They noticed some ...
2
votes
1answer
33 views

Why is there no U3 snRNP in the spliceosome complex of transcription initiation?

snRNP U1,U2,U4,U5,U6 are present in the spliceosome but there is no mention of U3.
2
votes
3answers
6k views

Why do our eyes close when we sleep?

Why do our eyes close when we sleep? Is it to relax our eye muscles? How can it be explained from an evolutionary point of view?
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Evidence of species transitions [on hold]

I had a debate with a person who believes in some kind of creativism, let's call it that way. And in the middle of the "debate", an interesting question popped up. What are evidences of ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Lack of yolk in mammalian oocytes as compared to other vertebrates?

Why do mammalian oocytes have little to no yolk? How does it compare to other vertebrates such as frogs, fish, and birds?
4
votes
0answers
32 views

How do disulphide bonds in hair cause curling?

I understand that the asymmetrical distribution of disulphide bonds in hair cause curling, but do not completely understand why this causes an inherent curl on the macroscopic level, for several ...
-2
votes
0answers
33 views
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Was the frequency of mutations more during primitive earth due to radioactivity?

Primitive earth was more radioactive (or was it really?) according to radiometric analysis of C14 which suddenly appeared at 4250 million years in the Hadeon eon. Is it possible that ancient high ...
3
votes
1answer
125 views

Why are cancer rates low in large animals?

Large animals generally have more cells and live longer than smaller animals. For example, bowhead whales live up to 200 years and weigh up to 100 tonnes, as opposed to humans (living ~71 years and ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Can memory be improved with mental training? [on hold]

I am a man in his mid thirties, but I already have a pretty bad memory. (I have always had a bad memory.) I can remember certain kinds of facts and music very well, but when it comes to words or even ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

Are scientist able to correct mutiple gene defect in our body by using CRISPR

Are scientist able to correct mutiple gene defect in whole body by using CRISPR recently? AS i know, it is in a beginning stage
-2
votes
0answers
49 views

if the selfish gene theory is correct, why do survival machines with more resources not choose to replicate more? [on hold]

I am not a biologist. But I am reading Richard Dawkins book "The Selfish Gene" and I find the science to be absolutely fascinating. So I am trying to look at the world (specifically human society) ...
2
votes
0answers
39 views

Why are eye defects so common? [duplicate]

The title says it all, what makes eye defects so common in the world? Whereas defects of any other body part is quite uncommon, I searched online and one of the articles said that 6 out of 10 people ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Oxidation and Molecular Degredation of Testosterone Enanthate [migrated]

The melting point of pharmaceutical grade Testosterone Enanthate is 32-34°C. Can the melting of raw sourced Testosterone Enanthate at (or above) this temperature range have a significant effect on the ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

What is the mechanism by which genes give rise to emotional compulsions in survival machines? [on hold]

If I understand the selfish gene theory correctly, genes are responsible for the behavior of survival machines. My (perhaps simplistic) understanding of human behavior is that the thoughts we think ...
2
votes
3answers
157 views

Swapping genes?

So, gene therapy is to take out a gene, correct its mutation, and put the corrected one back into the organism, right? Is it also possible to take out a gene from an organism and put in a totally ...
4
votes
1answer
51 views

What is the purpose of THC for a Cannabis plant?

Why does a Cannabis plant produce THC? This question is brought up drawing an analogy to nicotine in tobacco, where nicotine is developed by tobacco plants as a pesticide. Is THC a pesticide as well? ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Polar bodies fertilization

Suppose a sperm fertilized a 2nd polar body( haploid) is there a chance of somewhat normal development?
3
votes
1answer
16 views

Do fish increase or decrease pH of aquarium water?

If I understand it correctly, aquarium fish produce NH3 as their waste product and CO2 due to respiration. Producing NH3 increases water pH due to its equilibrium with NH4+. Producing CO2 decreases pH ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Influence of artificial sunlight on the human body

In a hypothetical scenario, where a large, permanently manned craft is in a continual orbit, and natural sunlight cannot be used as the craft may keep moving and turning, artificial sunlight is used ...
4
votes
0answers
84 views

Why do mammals produce more carbon dioxide than insects?

I understand that mammals produce more carbon dioxide than insects on a gram per gram basis, but why is that? I'm thinking it might be because mammals are warm-blooded, which require more energy ...
10
votes
1answer
98 views

Unilateral damage to vagus nerve

Context: The vagus nerves supply the neck viscera, heart, lungs and gastrointestinal tract. They join around the oesophagus to form the oesophageal plexus. Question: Would damage to one vagus nerve ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views
1
vote
2answers
90 views

Extending a small fragment of DNA

Is there a way to extend a small fragment of DNA, say 150 bp, by making copies of itself and attaching each copy of that small fragment to the end of that 150 bp sequence? For example, I want a ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

How fast could a Deinonychus run?

My 4-year-old demands to know, and we couldn't find it stated anywhere on the Web. Thanks!
7
votes
1answer
63 views

Why does the proportion of transposable elements vary so much across species?

Intuitively, transposable elements (TEs) are harmful as they may cause genome instability. However, some people argue that TEs are also sources of variations, especially regulatory sequences[1]. If ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

How does heat generated by metabolism differ compared with heat generated through exercise?

I am from a mathematical background so I don't have much knowledge on biology. I'm building a mathematical model to predict heat generation with parameters of metabolic heat generation and exercise ...
3
votes
0answers
27 views

RAD sequencing: choosing the appropriate enzyme?

I’m studying Darwin’s finches genome and I say in some articles that the researchers used restriction enzymes to cut the DNA in their double digest RAD protocol. They are using EcoRI and MseI (GAATTC ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Interpretation of faint band for Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test

After having used the test for research it would appear as if it is very specific. What is one to make of bands that are there but faint? Or what if there are two bands and one is big and bold and the ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

What would be “Sternum-Intermediate” distance?

I've asked this question on the English Language & Usage board, not being entirely sure whether this question is strictly medical, or just English knowledge suffices to answer. Do note I am no ...
-1
votes
0answers
22 views

what is the Ground substance of plant organs made up of? [closed]

there's this MCQ question in my course that asks about the origin of ground substance in plants it says: ground substance of plant organs is made up of a) Sclerenchyma b) Collenchyma c) paranchyma ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

All about Sansevieria [closed]

1.Does Sansevieria plant gives out O2 at both day and night ? 2.Is it possible to grow Sansevieria plant with out sunlight ? (If not) 3.How many hours of sunlight is needed per day and what is the ...
1
vote
1answer
19 views

Advantage of GCPRs over RTKs or other receptor protein kinases

My book lists two important differences between GCPRs and receptor protein kinases: GCPRs do not directly activate a signal transduction pathway. It only does so indirectly, via a G protein. On the ...
1
vote
0answers
11 views

Can we take advantage of nanopore sequencing systematic errors to predict secondary structure motifs?

One of the methods of single-molecule sequencing, Nanopore sequencing, is based on traversal of DNA strand through a nanopore. Nucleotide is determined by measurement of ion current (when nucleotide ...
-1
votes
0answers
89 views

Can you get pregnant from having sex in a hot tub after sitting in it for a while? [closed]

I'd call the question "How does staying in hot water affect men's chances to impregnate a woman" but you get the idea already. At school we are taught that sperm die at 92 °F (~33.3333 °C) and below ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Incomplete dominance with gain-of-function allele

Can somebody site an example of incomplete dominance with gain-of-function mutation?
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Does human body have a centre of mass? [migrated]

According to this site, The center of mass of the human body depends on the gender and the position of the limbs. In a standing posture, it is typically about 10 cm lower than the navel, near the ...
1
vote
2answers
28 views

Growth factors vs. mitogens

According to Campbell Biology, A growth factor is a protein released by certain cells that stimulates other cells to divide. and according to Wikipedia, A mitogen is a chemical substance ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Connecting nanotubes to wires! [closed]

So these nanotubes have a great deal of conductance, so can a assay of nanotubes be connected to a normal jumper wire (I conducted an experiment and it proved to be somewhat successful). Can a bunch ...
2
votes
3answers
222 views

Amplification technique for proteins similar to PCR for DNA?

I know PCR can be used to amplify a tiny sample of DNA in order to perform experiments. Is there a similar technique to use on a protein sample? More specifically, I'm not interested in "cutting" up ...
1
vote
0answers
127 views

How does geography affect morphological features of the human body

I've seen many times how a person born in one place, goes to another country for a long time, and then they start looking more like the people there, but I never found out how it works. This report ...
4
votes
1answer
30 views

What determines the shape of the center-surround receptive fields of retinal ganglion cells?

The wikipedia article about receptive fields of visual system tells us the following: The receptive field is often identified as the region of the retina where the action of light alters the ...

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