2
votes
1answer
33 views

What does the Gini index mean in a biochemical context?

What is the meaning of the Gini index, as specificed in this link, which describes the Gini index of beta-glucopyranose bound to hexokinase? Is this true that if Gini index has a very low value that ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

A non human adaptive behaviour with a spandrel

Is there any adaptive behaviour in non humans which, when it is functioning as it was selected to do, creates a spandrel behaviour? In evolutionary biology, a spandrel is a phenotypic ...
3
votes
1answer
65 views

Questions regarding a particular paper

With respect to the following paper: Automated identification of protein-ligand interaction features using Inductive Logic Programming: a hexose binding case study I have a few questions: in page ...
9
votes
1answer
92 views

What is the convention for log notation in biology?

I'm reading through some oldish (1980s) papers on length-weight relationships in fish and crustaceans. Many report log-log relationships without specifying whether this is natural log, base 10, etc. ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

Multi-nucleated cells: advantages and examples?

This question arises because I saw that monocytes and leukocytes are commonly called 'mononuclear cells' in the scientific literature. The implication of course being that other immune sub-types are ...
5
votes
1answer
57 views

How does CO₂ concentration affect photosynthesis?

I have heard the theory that with the increase of CO2 in the air, the speed of the photosynthesis would increase, thereby limiting the increase of CO2 levels. What is currently the rate limiting ...
3
votes
1answer
36 views

determining meaning of basic biological keywords about C. elegans

First of all I have to say that I have no biology background since I'm a undergraduate computer science student. Nowadays, for my research I need to use some of the databases related with ...
5
votes
0answers
42 views

Are fish roe unicellular?

Are roe (fish eggs, caviar, etc.) single cells? I have tried looking this up on google (sadly, to no avail), and I am guessing they might be multicellular (like bird eggs) or consist of one cell plus ...
4
votes
1answer
153 views

What is this flying insect?

This insect was captured in Australia near Canberra. It has a very hard exoskeleton and is over an inch long. It seems to have 6 wings - 2 large pairs and one very small pair. I did not see a stinger ...
3
votes
0answers
19 views

Pits and Pores in Vascular Tissue

What purpose is served by the pits and pores in xylem and phloem cells? I cant find what purpose that these components serve in the vascular tissues in plants
4
votes
1answer
33 views

How does loss of the electrochemical gradient result in heat production?

As far as I understand, uncoupling of the flow of protons and ATP-synthase provides a bypass for protons between the outer and the inner membrane of mitochondria so that the protons don't have to go ...
4
votes
1answer
87 views

Inoculation vs. vaccination

Is there any actual difference between inoculation and vaccination or are these terms interchangeable? In case the difference exists, would it be correct to say that inoculation is purposefully ...
0
votes
2answers
39 views

Protein secondary structure prediction

I'm trying to predict the protein secondary and 3-D structure for the sequence [Q1NN20] and need some help getting the ball rolling. I'm getting confused with how and when to use Jpred, swiss-mod, ...
2
votes
0answers
57 views

Were we able to create vitamin B12 in past?

All herbivores produce vitamin B12 de novo. Gorillas, for example, are "vegans" so I suppose some human ancestor was also herbivore. Have we ever been B12 self-producers? If so, why have we lost that ...
9
votes
1answer
320 views

Are flowers / flowering plants vital to all life on Earth?

Not a biology student so forgive me if this is a very basic question. Are flowering plants (angiosperms) vital to all (or most) life on Earth? In other words, if flowering plants disappeared, would ...
1
vote
0answers
12 views

Neuston vs pleuston

I was recently reading about the wonderful chondrophores, and came across the terms "neuston" and "pleuston". According to Wikipedia, "neuston" are "the organisms that float on the top of water ... ...
3
votes
1answer
47 views

How does a microelectrode work?

On Wikipedia, the entire microelectrode page states only the following: A microelectrode is an electrode of very small size, used in electrophysiology for either recording of neural signals or ...
4
votes
1answer
27 views

Wearing sunglasses during a solar eclipse [closed]

Note: I had asked this on Physics, but it is off-topic there due to being about safety. On the BBC's guide to eclipse-watching, Dr Lucie Green says: Watching an eclipse with normal sunglasses ...
1
vote
2answers
37 views

How do the 'energy making' processes in the body differ for fat calories, protein calories, and carb calories? [closed]

How does the body make energy from each of the macronutrients? Is there a difference in the efficiency of the distinct processes and would the least efficient process be 'better' for weight loss?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is it possible for a child to grow taller than their tallest parent?

I have heard that off spring can't grow taller than either of their parents but I've also heard that sometimes some gene activation can skip generations. Is it possible for a child to grow taller than ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Is it safe to look indirectly at the Sun?

I.e., is exposure of sunlight onto the peripheral vision less damaging than exposure onto the fovea?
3
votes
2answers
81 views

Mass Spectrometry Terminology

I began reading this paper (http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2105/14/56) and had a few questions about mass spectrometry terminology that I couldn't find answers to elsewhere. Consider the following ...
4
votes
1answer
46 views

Oxygenated hemoglobin in MRI

I have read the following sentence: Because this oxygenated hemoglobin is unaffected by magnetic fields, the response RF signal returned to the fMRI scanner is stronger when there is more ...
2
votes
1answer
13 views

MTHFR recessive alleles and B-vitamins

I know that being heterozygous or homozygous recessive for the MTHFR gene prevents that person from being able to process and use folate and B-12. It causes an unhealthy level of homocysteine to ...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Insect (I hope) identification

Look, let's get something straight. I am not the worlds biggest sissy when it comes to bugs, but I'm not David Attenborough either. Now that that's out of the way, down to business. Living in ...
12
votes
3answers
206 views

What are the effects of long-term liquid breathing?

I just saw a recent Physics question that mentioned liquid breathing (which I had never heard of before) and I started to wonder about its long-term effects. Let's imagine a person underwent liquid ...
7
votes
1answer
75 views

What is the difference between a mechanistic and a statistical predictive model?

The simplest description of the difference between these two approaches that I have found are on this site who summarise the difference as: Mechanistic model: a hypothesized relationship between the ...
4
votes
0answers
41 views

Does breath-holding cause permanent brain damage?

My question is: Does voluntarily holding your breath at atmospheric pressure for a few minutes can cause brain damage? I'm talking about periods of time around 3 minutes. I've read there are some ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Analytical Methods for Estimating Probability of Fixation

The probability of fixation $P$ of an allele is an very important measure and there exists several solutions to estimate this probability. Each method has its own assumptions and it is often hard to ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

RF Cautery DNA damage?

I'm concerned about the safety and mechanism of RF cautery. The frequency of the radio waves used is 4Mhz so normally there should not be any DNA damage BUT the thing you read everywhere is that only ...
5
votes
4answers
87 views

Any good website/book to understand protein folding and enzymes?

I'm looking for a good, understandable and simple explanation about protein folding, mechanisms and function, and their relationship with enzymes. I understand that the protein is a polypeptidic ...
3
votes
1answer
50 views

Can we knock out Caspase-9 *and* avoid breast cancer phenotype in our mouse model?

I am trying to design a wet lab experiment with no wet lab experience to name. Right now, in my dream land, it would be excellent if it were possible to create a Caspase-9 knockout mouse (damage to ...
6
votes
2answers
61 views

Is Sanger sequencing still used in labs, and therefore worth learning?

If iI were to have access to funds for research, would learning this technique be a boon for me? Or are next-gen sequencing methods all the range now? My knowledge of both are limited.
0
votes
1answer
21 views

How is cancer associated with host pathogen interaction?

Does cancer by any chance fall under host pathogen interaction domain? What I mean to ask is that, is there pathogen interaction involved in cancer? I went through this article: ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Herbal remedies for damaged tissue [closed]

What is the mechanism of action of Arnica oil to repair damaged tissue? Which preparation of Arnica is more effective - an oil-based or water-based extract?
0
votes
1answer
25 views

NCBI-geo differences between platforms,series and samples

This is the first time that I use NCBI-GEO and I've faced with 3 different categories inside it. They are platform, sample and ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

What is the difference between polar and charged amino acids?

Chemically polar amino acids have an uneven (AKA polar) distribution of electrons over their surface. Charged amino acids have a charged ion in their structure. This is probably where my knowledge ...
3
votes
0answers
67 views

What metabolic processes do dormant and ungerminated seeds carry out?

What metabolic processes does a dormant embryo in a seed carry out? Seeds will not germinate, either because of a lack of favourable conditions, seed hibernation, or because of a genetically ...
2
votes
2answers
66 views

Do variant callers miss rare variants in reference?

Generally variant calling programs (such as GATK-UnifiedGenotyper) look for differences between reference genome and submitted sequence. However, we all know that reference genome consist rare ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

How many traits can a multivariate breeders equation handle?

The multivariate breeders equation (MBE) by Lande predicts the change in a trait $\Delta \bar z$ (response) as $\Delta \bar z = G \beta$ where $G$ is a genetic variance-covariance matrix and ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Who is organizing the heartbeat and its roles in the body?

Throughout the decades we heard that the heart is the only muscle whose nervous system is not acting. So who is he responsible for organising the heartbeat and its roles?
3
votes
1answer
55 views

The selective pressure of contraceptives

Does it seem probable that the existence of contraceptives (which has reduced human reproduction to below survival-level in many populations) will be a completely new selective pressure on human ...
2
votes
0answers
15 views

Does blood typing still provide a use for ancient tissue analysis?

Modern techniques. In recent years, DNA sequencing has become extremely cheap. This, compounded by the ability to PCR miniscule samples to viable samples for analysis, means that aDNA can be ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Is there a biological environment that we can we assume glutamate exists as glutamic acid?

In the body we almost always assume that glutamate exists as glutamate rather than glutamic acid. It is so commonly glutamate yet glutamic acid and glutamate share the abbreviations of Glu and E. From ...
11
votes
2answers
490 views

How long does a mosquito take to land on a host, bite, and fly off?

How long does a mosquito take to land on a host, start its bite, end its bite and then fly off? And what about different species? I am most interested in human hosts. References to web sites or ...
28
votes
4answers
5k views

Why don't mammals have more than 4 limbs?

Arthropods have 6 or more limbs and arthropods with 6 limbs appear to move faster than arthropods with 8 limbs so I wonder whether this might have something to do with fast and efficient locomotion. ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Phytoestrogens from hops in beer and estrogenic activity in humans

There is a saying that phytoestrogens from hops can cause male boobs in male beer drinkers. Are there any reliable studies linking beer consumption to increased estrogenic activity? In males and ...
2
votes
2answers
40 views

Mosquito physics

What are the environmental limitations of mosquitos I should know of if I want to avoid getting bitten? For example: How fast should I walk in order to be moving too fast for one to bite me? Can a ...
2
votes
2answers
31 views

How can 3' end polyadenylation protect cellular RNA from ribonuclease degridation?

In this link, it states: It is worth noting that all intracellular RNAs are protected from RNase activity by a number of strategies including 5' end capping, 3' end polyadenylation, and folding ...
16
votes
2answers
16k views

Are mosquitoes repelled by high frequency sound?

I am totally confused whether ask this question to physics or biology stackexchange. I downloaded a mobile application which claims to repel mosquitoes. This application basically produces sound from ...

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