3
votes
1answer
31 views

How much pollen is needed to pollinate a flower?

Assuming 100% of the pollen gets delivered to exactly the locations it needs to pollinate a female flower, how much pollen is needed to pollinate a flower? If it's more than one unit of pollen, what, ...
7
votes
1answer
71 views

Why do people with Down syndrome get fewer cancers?

I'm coming across some conflicting information regarding the correlation between cancer incidents and trisomy 21. I read a report from nature that discusses how Downs are only a tenth as likely to ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Are any biology research journals free to publish in? [closed]

The research journals Ive published in require significant financial cost to publish. On top of that many require a membership to the society the journal is associated with, in addition to publication ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

Are the irises an exact match in a human's set of eyes?

Are the irises an exact match in a human's set of eyes? Assuming the eyes are healthy with 20/20 vision.
5
votes
1answer
34 views

What worms devour the body?

I was reading http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/acne/adult-10/slideshow-adult-acne which broached comedones, an esoteric word to me; so I thought to look up its etymology which I find ...
2
votes
1answer
29 views

Bacteria can resist topical antibiotics but not compounds?

The excerpt below origiantes from p 2 of 4, but p 4 of 4 reveals the review of the entire articleby Debra Jaliman, MD on April 17, 2014. Usually, topical antibiotics aren't recommended alone as ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

How to predict the top microRNAs that bind to 3`UTR of a specific gene [duplicate]

I would like to know whether someone could tell me 1) some of the online programs that will predict the top microRNAs that bind to 3`UTR of a specific gene (for eg-GAPDH). I am relatively new to ...
8
votes
1answer
71 views

What will happen if a scorpion pierces itself?

If a scorpion pierces itself, will it die or immune to its poison? If it produces the venom its blood should be immune to itself poison.
3
votes
1answer
29 views

In which of the following diseases structure of haemoglobin produced is normal but their amount reduced?

The options provided are- Chronic blood loss Sickle cell anaemia Haemolytic anaemia Thallasaemia Transfusion reactions - *Q-15: pg-785; **Review of Medical Physiology - William F. ...
8
votes
1answer
77 views

How long can Cholera bacteria survive in a dead host?

How long can cholera bacterium survive inside a dead host? Can they remain dormant in such conditions? BACKGROUND On a hill not far from where I live, there was a hospital operating since 16th until ...
8
votes
2answers
543 views

Why vaccines do not cause bacterial resistance?

Since bacteria can evolve to overcome antibiotic use, why wouldn't be able to evolve to overcome antibody or cell-mediated immunity? Thanks One possible explanation: antibiotics have only one target ...
1
vote
2answers
31 views

How to safely sterilize urea-containing growth medium?

I'm using urea-containing growth medium for experiments with bacteria (1-2 l/day). After the experiment, the growth medium has to be sterilized and disposed. I did this so far by autoclaving, but our ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

What sort of assay could be used to identify mutants with mutator phenotype? [closed]

By mutator phenotype, I mean being more prone to mutations, for example due to mutations in genes involved in DNA repair. I was thinking about exposing the cells to agents that damage DNA (uv light, ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Stable transfection

I need to achieve stable transfection of a pCI-Neo plasmid into the genome of a mouse embryo. The most common way to achieve stable transfection is through positive selection, however positive ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Examples of extant animals in a submature morphologically unstable evolutionary state?

I'm fascinated by evolutionary theory and the predictive aspect of it-the notion of an animal entering a strongly divergent state of evolution whereby it is evolving into a new form yet remains ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

Why mutations in genes involved in general processes like DNA repair increase the risk of developing specific types of cancer?

For example, mutation in MHS2, which encodes a protein involved in the repair of mismatches that occur during DNA replication, dramatically increases the risk of developing colon cancer. (There are ...
4
votes
1answer
43 views

Cellular Respiration/Fermentation Problem Leading to Lack of Energy

A young animal has never had much energy. He is brought to a veterinarian for help and is sent to the animal hospital for some tests. There they discover his mitochondria can use only fatty acids and ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Layman definition of genetic polymorphism?

I am reading an article about Genetic Polymorphism and there are lines in the article about genetic polymophism that I don't quite understand like. In this area,there are six different chemotypes ...
4
votes
2answers
153 views

explanation of meaning of high-throughput

Almost all of the papers about bioinformatics, I faced with the high-throughput word, but I could not find any explanation about it (I think it is so easy to understand and thats why anyone explains ...
4
votes
1answer
21 views

What's the maximum pressure inside a bombardier beetle?

This question got me wondering about the pressure inside a bombardier beetle. Lots of articles mention pressure, but don't specify the amount of it: One study records the velocity of the spray to ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

meaning of the “reads” keyword in terms of RNA-seq or next generation sequencing

I'm an undergraduate student at computer science and currently, I'm interested in bioinformatics. Today, I've started to read a paper about clustering and classification of non-coding RNAs can be ...
3
votes
1answer
21 views

Telomere and its effect on aging

The cloned sheep, Dolly, was said to have died very soon because the cells used to create it were taken from an adult sheep with an aged telomere. Why doesn't this happen with humans? Why aren't we ...
1
vote
0answers
15 views

What is the maximal insert length for PCR based homologous recombination in S. cerevisae

I would like to insert a 6 kbp construct, which I have on a plasmid into the genome of S. cerevisiae. This plasmid was originally constructed to integrate at the HIS locus via homologous recombination ...
4
votes
0answers
35 views

How does the value of K determine number of local optima in NK model?

BACKGROUND The NK model of fitness landscape considers N states which can interact with K other states. For example N is the total number of genes in a haploid genome and K is the number of other ...
4
votes
1answer
268 views

What is our skin made up of?

Again, it is a basic question. What is our skin made up of? is it made up of many cells arranged in a systematic way or is it just like any layer say of a book?? what is the difference? where is the ...
2
votes
1answer
30 views

What network motifs or other mechanisms can make the expression of a gene invariable to the environment?

Next to double positive feedback loops and chromatin modification, which other mechanisms can make a gene susceptible to a certain environment in one cell-type but not in another?
2
votes
0answers
37 views

Sensitivity of eyes to flashing lights

My eyes are very sensitive to flashing lights - for example I'm always the first person to notice that a fluorescent tube is about to fail because I see it flickering when other people can't. When ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

Optical density machine name

What is the name of the machine used to measure optical density? We used it in a lab but I can't remember what they called it.
53
votes
5answers
10k views

Does DNA have the equivalent of IF-statements, WHILE loops, or function calls? How about GOTO?

Does DNA have anything like IF-statements, GOTO-jumps, or WHILE loops? In software development, these constructs have the following functions: IF-statements: An IF statement executes the code in a ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Why do Lapidaria margaretae look like stones?

Previous Research I stumbled across a trending reddit post "Lapidaria margaretae looks like stones" (as of 3rd Februrary 2015); but I could not find discussions as to reasons behind why. Question/s ...
1
vote
3answers
89 views

If a gene is located on the X sex chromosome does that mean males are either Homozygous dominant or Homozygous recessive and are never Heterozygous?

As said in the title I am a little confused on the Idea of traits located on the sex chromosomes. The example we worked on in class was hemophilia a recessive trait and since it is located on the X ...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

What mechanisms exist for the excision of specific sequences from DNA?

I already know about recombinases (specifically excisionases), but was wondering if there were other mechanisms present.
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Can life forms exist from simple structures not made of the four bases? [closed]

I understand that all life forms on the planet are made from adenine, gauatine, cytosine and thymine, which chemically joined together to form RNA or DNA (correct me if I'm wrong). This goes on to ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Fixation rate at neutral loci

It is a classical result that the expected time for a neutral mutation to occur and to get fixed is $2 N \mu \frac{1}{2N} = \mu$, where $N$ is the population size and $\mu$ is the neutral mutation ...
4
votes
1answer
83 views

What are the total number of action potentials in the human brain?

Is there an approximate figure of the total number of action potentials in the human brain? It's my understanding that there are ~ 60 billion neurons in the brain with ~ 100 trillion connections ...
14
votes
1answer
829 views

How Do White Blood Cells Learn? Or Do They?

So I get the concept that a vaccine is a weakened form of a virus so that the body can "learn" to fight it and make a person immune to that disease, but how exactly does this learning take place? What ...
3
votes
1answer
40 views

Do our ears or brains gradually adapt to noise pollution?

Having lived in various places all over the world for the past 9 years of my life, one thing stood out to me throughout this time, and now in particular. From a quiet place on the countryside in ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Does malaria have a reservoir host?

Can warm blooded vertebrates other than humans act as reservoir hosts for malaria parasites? I'm mainly interested in plasmodium vivax and possible reservoir hosts in the wider area of Europe/ ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Find the probability of Filium (child) that are dark (and) heterozygote [duplicate]

Two mice are crossed and both are dark and heterozygote. Find the probability of their filium(children) dark (and) heterozygote in F1. Here's what our teacher explained: I don't understand. I ...
2
votes
0answers
22 views

Degree of dosage compensation in Drosophila melanogaster

In this paper the authors state that the dosage compensation seen in Drosophila is approximately twofold, but they do not provide any source or numbers (as far as I can see) for this. What is the mean ...
-1
votes
0answers
39 views

Size of the Drosophila melangoaster genome components

How large are: one X chromosome one of each of the major autosome (chromosomes 2 and 3) for Drosophila melanogaster in the following measures? Length of DNA expressed in base pairs e.g. Mega ...
5
votes
1answer
49 views

(Why) are polar bears more common in Labrador than in southern Greenland?

The Labrador Sea is between Greenland, Labrador, and Qikiqtaaluk: Map source. A Greenlandic source on polar bears states: In Greenland the polar bear lives and breeds in the northernmost parts ...
2
votes
1answer
24 views

Electroporation of one-cell embryo?

Would electroporation be successful on a one/two-celled mouse embryo? If it would, what buffer could be used and what percentage of cells would be viable? Thank you.
1
vote
2answers
53 views

The Ancient Kingdom of Monera

Why exactly were bacteria and archaea kingdoms separated from the now unused kingdom of Monera? Aren't they the same? They are both prokaryotes, so what is the difference?
4
votes
1answer
58 views

How can E. coli proliferate so rapidly?

The E. coli has a genome with approximately 5×106 bp. The main DNA polymerase involved in its chromosome duplication (DNA pol III , the one with highest processivity) can polymerize ~103 nucleotides ...
2
votes
1answer
22 views

Are there multiple meanings to “clone” as in “clone a gene”?

I originally thought that cloning a gene meant to put it into bacteria and have them express it. But sometimes I see it used and it seems like it's just a synonym for "identify the sequence and/or ...
5
votes
1answer
779 views

Are all dinosaur bones radioactive?

I watching some TV program some time ago and a guy in it mentioned that when-ever museums display real dinosaur bones (as opposed to a replica) the bones are painted over with a lead paint, because ...
3
votes
1answer
15 views

Can virus resistance be acquired through generational exposure?

If I have a squash plant that has a mosaic virus of some kind, and I breed its descendants (via seed) for generations, each with exposure to the same virus, will future generations be likely to ...
4
votes
0answers
57 views

How to tell if a beverage will hydrate or dehydrate?

Beverages of any type generally contain some measure of water. However, in the case of some liquids, the non-water components take more water from the human body to filter out than the water contained ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

What is the probe that absorbs at 450nm in the presence of NADH in this assay?

The colorimetric assays by Biovision and Sigma Aldrich seem to utilise a probe that binds to or reacts with NADH in order to cause absorbance at 450nm which can then be quantified by a ...

15 30 50 per page