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It may never have happened again, however, since all lifeforms on Earth today are similar on a molecular level (DNA), suggesting a common origin. An important distinction to make here is that all extant life on Earth has a common origin. It's completely possible that abiogenesis occurred many times, but whatever organisms emerged as a result became ...


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Welcome to Biology.SE! Your question has nothing to do with evolutionary biology Evolutionary Theory does not explain the origin of life just like the Theory of Gravity does not explain the diffraction of light! In other words, explaining the origin of life is not within the scope of evolutionary biology. You should edit your title. But still, your ...


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It may never have happened again, however, since all lifeforms on Earth today are similar on a molecular level Actually, the similarity is at the chemical level where the chirality of all known-life's amino acids are "left-handed" (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypothetical_types_of_biochemistry#Alternative-chirality_biomolecules). Since there is ...


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You are right in the sense the evolutionary biology doesn't try to explain the origin of life as it is not within its scope. Other fields of biology investigate the question of origin of life (abiogenesis). Now, there is a very important difference between spontaneous generation and evolution. Life originated at some point and the through repetitive ...


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Evolution is about descent with modification. Spontaneous generation doesn't have that. It's about modern organisms emerging from raw molecules. If flies spontaneously appeared from rotting cow meat, why would they have DNA that made them look like they were evolutionarily related to other insects?


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We might imagine living things that are very different from what we know. There is no conceptual reason for limiting life in its relation to water for example. Moreover, the definition of what is alive is really unclear. We classified more or less arbitrarily objects we know on earth as being living or not living but this does not give any clear definition ...


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Some people think that abiogenesis did occur more than once, and that the results of those occurrences are still with us. Paul Davies, for instance, is a proponent of what he calls 'the shadow biosphere' (here's a link to a popular article on his views: http://www.theguardian.com/science/2013/apr/14/shadow-biosphere-alien-life-on-earth). I've seen him talk ...


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The problem with Intelligent Design is that it doesn't appreciate that the forces that shape species (and individual organism) have to be constant and ongoing or the species disappears. The past matters little, it's what happens right here, right now that keeps species in any particular form. Biological system are not static structures like a building. You ...



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