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According to this paper, green pigments are found in lepidoptera. The study focused on Geometridae, and found that the primary pigment in emerald moths, such as Hemistola chrysoprasaria is also found as secondary pigment in Pseudoips prasinana. The authors dubbed the substance 'Geoverdin' and suggest it may be a derivative of chlorophyll consumed during the ...


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As a couple of counterexamples, species in the classes Symphyla (Pseudocentipedes) and Pauropoda within Myriapoda have 8-11 and 12 leg pairs respectively, so between 16 to 24 legs (sometimes with one or two leg pair stronlgy reduced in size). (species in Symphyla, from wikipedia) Another common and species-rich group with 14 walking legs (7 leg pairs) is ...


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Although not a biologist, Steven Pinker notes that bilateral symmetry evolved in organisms to allow them to move in a straight line. For a bilaterally symmetrical animal to move, they simply alternate movements between one half of their body and the other. This is true for fish, snakes, insects, mammals, etc. There are exceptions, for instance, flying and ...


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It is, of course, not just mammals, but nearly all animal life is symmetric. Even plants are usually symmetric in some degree. There are exceptions here and there. For example, one interesting exception is that of the fiddler crab which has one claw larger than another. In general, when a single appendage is present on an animal it is nearly always on the ...


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There's really two answers to the question. The first is overall symmetry: mammals, like all tetrapods, are bilaterally symmetric. This comes from a distant common origin with other bilaterally symmetric organisms. Organisms which evolved from this common ancestor often have organs in pairs, probably evolving as a re-use of regulatory genes. The other ...



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