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Why do we (as humans) laugh? The consensus in the community of researchers seems to be that we laugh because it strengthens human social connections. Counter-intuitively, it's not always because we find things funny. The linked article implies that although it's not exactly clear why we laugh, laughter is a form of seemingly non-deliberate social ...


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I don't know about brain mass to body size, but ratio of neocortex to brain volume is correlated with primate evolution (Figure 3, here). If you subscribe to the view that humans and more closely related primates are more intelligent than more distantly related primates, then that is an important correlate. I think the issue with this question is that we're ...


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It is hypothesized that the starkness of white sclera against darker colors of the pupil and iris is a unique mutation in primates that have become prevalent in human beings because it enhanced our ability to communicate with other humans and animals, including dogs, by more clearly communicating where we are looking. However, it has not yet been ...


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The discovery strengthens the bering strait land bridge hypothesis because if I remember right they did genetic analysis and her ancestors were almost certainly east asian. As for opposing migration models, they involve boats. Some evidence exists for polynesians reaching the west coast of south america, but probably in small numbers and not before humans ...


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A new study published in the journal PLoS One compared facial characteristics, gazing behaviors, and sociality of 26 different canid species (including wolves, bush dogs, and Arctic foxes). The researchers found that animals with eyes and facial features that are easier to discern are more likely to live and hunt socially. (One of the authors, S. Kohshima, ...


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It is not known for sure. But I find Hurley and Dennett's theory very convincing. Our brains are engaged full time in real-time (risky) heuristic search, generating presumtpions about what will be experienced next in every domain. This time-pressured, unsupervised generation process has necessarily lenient standards and introduces content - not all of ...


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Try this article as a starting point; Stringer, Chris B., and Peter Andrews. "Genetic and fossil evidence for the origin of modern humans." Science 239.4845 (1988): 1263-1268. It is old, but it has been cited 918 times to date. That should be more than enough of a breadcrumb trail to find what you are looking for. Also if you click through to the Science ...


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Why do we laugh? The leading research on why we laugh is done by Robert Provine. He has even written several books on the topic. His theory is that laughter was a primitve form of communication that evolved. For example,he and some graduate students listened in on average conversations in public places and made notes. And in a survey of 1,200 "laugh ...


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Human body is a responsive machine. Our body produces reaction to every action picked by any one of our senses. For example, a sudden loud noise might tremble our body. This reaction is perceived by us human beings that the person is scared. Similarly our body responds to something absurd with a laughter or smile. This is perceived by us human beings that ...


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How many more weeks in utero does Karp think would be ideal? I don't know Karp at all, but a quick search indicates he's known for soothing babies by swaddling. Great. My mother swaddled all her infants many decades ago. If he is comparing human neonates to primate neonates, he's correct. Baby primates are born pretty much knowing how to cling onto the ...


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Interesting question. The organism would have to be monogamous, that's for sure, otherwise it would be too competitive and it would be a beast - as chimps are. Chimps couldn't integrate into the modern society. So, monogamy is the prime prerequisite as it's also prerequisite for intelligence. Bipedalism is another obvious prerequisite, as you need an ...


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Some theories: Dead bodies died of something. In the earliest ages these were generally infection. Burying them protected us from something that could kill us too. This is also why we would be evolutionarily programmed against cannibalism They make great fertiliser. Burying waste, dead animals etc resulted in the growth of plants etc which not only food we ...



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