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The female stood with the tail held sharply to one side, and the quills on the back lying very flat. The male stood on his hind legs, while the front legs grasped the sides of the female. There was no repetition of the act. The male's urethra is 115-120 mm long, and his penis is 75 mm, so the he doesn't need to be as close to the female as one ...


10

No, I don't think auto-regulation explain much in the population sizes of predators. Group selection may explain such auto-reagulation but I don't think it is of any considerable importance for this discussion. You'll be interested in various model of prey-predator or of consumer-ressource interactions. as @shigeta said, what the following says is: predators ...


2

One of the possible adjustments of these mathematical models is to introduce a "place to hide", making some (small) percent of the prey population not accessible (or much more difficult to access) for predators. After the number of predators decreases from starvation, prey individuals are relatively safer outside the "place to hide" and can grow over this ...


2

Wikipedia has some revealing information here: Not all puffers are necessarily poisonous; Takifugu oblongus, for example, is a fugu puffer that is not poisonous, and toxin level varies wildly even in fish that are. A puffer's neurotoxin is not necessarily as toxic to other animals as it is to humans, and puffers are eaten routinely by some species of ...


1

Remi.b's answer is an excellent one, and this should be taken as a supplement to it: It's possible your simulation is correct The Lotka-Volterra equations are what is known as a deterministic model, and it describes the behavior of predator-prey systems (in a somewhat simplified fashion) in large populations. Small populations are subject to what is known ...



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