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2

inf3rno's comment provides a great example, in the production of vinegar (Food Safety Magazine): In the production of some fermented foods, biofilms are an essential element for optimum production. During the production of vinegar, acetic acid bacteria are allowed to grow on wood chips. The biofilm that is formed helps make the conversion of substrate to ...


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It makes no difference at all. To sterilize your hands you would need to wash them with water at around 115 degrees C at 1.2 atmospheres of pressure for over 30 minutes – that's obviously not going to happen. The bacteria that normally reside on your skin can easily tolerate tap water, no matter whether the faucet is set to maximum hot or maximum cold, ...


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The goal of hand washing is to remove surface debris, including foreign pathogens. Most things that most people encounter on a daily basis dissolve more easily in hot water than in cold water. Thus, hot water around 100° F is used to facilitate this debris removal process, although the ideal culture temperature for E coli and a raft of related bacteria is ...


26

The bacteria wouldn't see any benefit from the warm water in the ~30-60 seconds you're washing your hands, neither would hot water "sterilize" your hands at temperatures you could tolerate. The reason you wash your hands with hot water is because the hot water+detergent soap mix is better for removing oil and dirt than cold water+detergent, which is ...


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E. coli grows well on many types of media; I personally used Tryptone with NaCl. Many labs use E. coli for teaching purposes because it is not pathogenic and low maintenance.



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