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15

It is difficult to find a scientific answer to this question, but let me insert this citation from a specialist site: Contrary to popular belief, beaver cannot plan the direction in which trees will fall. Many trees become hung up in the branches of surrounding trees and are lost to the colony. In heavily forested areas, this loss may amount to one-half ...


9

The behaviour that you describe is common in most animal species, as part of the natural trade-off between access to food, minimizing risk, habituation and hunger. Animals usually choose to forage in high-quality habitats that has a low risk of predation, but if food sources are depleted (or competition and/or territoriality is high) they will move to other ...


6

This is not an area I know well, but I'm familiar with a couple of studies that have tried to estimate the heritable (genetic) component of homosexuality in humans. A review paper by Rice et al (2012) points out that: Pedigree and twin studies indicate that homosexuality has substantial heritability in both sexes, yet concordance between identical twins ...


5

Rumor has it that some moles, such as the star nosed mole, have electroreceptors in their nose. In 1993, Gould and colleagues proposed that the star-like proboscis had electroreceptors and that the mole was therefore able to sense the electrical field of its prey[24] prior to mechanical inspection by its appendages. Through behavioral experiments, they ...


4

Lets break this question into parts and answer them one by one. Do tears really save us from harm? Well, yes. this one says tears, mucus and saliva contain an enzyme that breaks down the cell wall of many bacteria. Those that are not killed immediately are trapped in mucus and swallowed. You can, obviously, search on google for another ...


4

In fact there are many cases of animals expressing a behaviour which benefit their predators, although it is controversial whether they "want" it. I mean arthropods and mammals infected with "mind-controlling" parasites. For example, an ant could become host of the liver fluke Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Then every night it would wait patiently on the top of a ...


4

Is it possible that an individual would benefit form being eaten? In theory it is possible that such behaviour would evolve. An individual may improve the probability of its genes to be passed on by letting a related individual (which carries similar gene variants) to feed on it. When counting the fitness of an individual as being the sum of the fitness of ...


4

This is a good question. This type of behavior -- pecking at a branch, wiping the side of the beak on a branch, pulling off twigs and dropping them, or knocking off pieces of bark -- is quite common among many corvid species, particularly when they are interrupted by something or someone that they might consider a threat. This includes not only potential ...


4

I couldn't find any information about ants starving in times of plenty, most likely since it's difficult to determine whether an ant colony is "letting" certain members starve or whether the ants have just died for whatever reason. To your second question, though, yes! This paper, The Effect of Colony Size and Starvation on Food Flow in the Fire Ant by ...


3

I will focus my answer on the evolution of orb web spiders (Fig. 1), because arachnids, like insects, are relatively non-complex creatures with an obvious systematic behavior (the weaving of highly symmetric, repeating structures). Hence I reasoned this would be a good approach of investigating the answer to this question. The orb-weavers (Orbiculariae, an ...


3

They can't see all the birds that are around them as some are hidden behind the others. However, I don't think there is anything so extraordinary; they watch around, have good reflexes and can change direction very abruptly. There is no need for some kind of special sensing abilities to explain bird flocks. 3 simple rules One can simulate a flock of birds ...


3

Short answer I think the author is mostly right, but there are exceptions. Background The author is probably referring to hunting as being an "active foraging" strategy, while he ascribes the foraging behavior of reptiles to be a "sit-and-wait" strategy. Active hunters include the classic, and dramatic high-speed, long-distance pursuit strategies deployed ...


3

The reason for this discrepancy is mainly a consequence of Bateman's principle. Citing wikipedia: Bateman's principle suggests that in most species, variability in reproductive success, or "reproductive variance," is greater in males than in females. This is ultimately a consequent of anisogamy. Females, especially mammalian females, almost always invest ...


2

At least two follow-up studies have investigated the behavioral consequences of the re-routing of the optic nerve to the auditory cortex. In these animals the visual cortices were ablated, and the optic nerve re-routed by combined lesions of the superior colliculus and ascending auditory pathways to the thalamus. These lesions induce retinal axons to form ...


2

Birds find their niches based on many reasons. Their choice is based on primarily resource availability, predation risk, and competition. Keep in mind there are variations among species, most birds like to forage for food at a hight safe enough to avoid ground predation, at the same time to be able to see and find food without much competition. Therefore ...


2

As expressed in the comments, the answer to this question depends on how you define 'hunting'. However, using common definitions in biology, hunting is almost used as a synonym to predation (see quoted definitions below). In that sense, the statement in your question is clearly incorrect, since it is describing the the foraging behaviours of predatory ...


2

I believe a lot of these behaviours can fall under the umbrella term of reciprocity, or reciprocal altruism. In evolutionary biology, reciprocal altruism is a behaviour whereby an organism acts in a manner that temporarily reduces its fitness while increasing another organism's fitness, with the expectation that the other organism will act in a ...


1

Physiologically speaking, your body is reacting to something you have known associations learning. An extreme form of this phenomenon is seen in drug addiction. After chronic use of a substance there are certain cues a person associates with the drug effects. Whether that be a certain group of people, a sound, a place, or an object the stimulant is ...


1

As the body mass of an organism decreases, their volume decreases exponentially, so their metabolic needs are also reduced. The result is that small organisms like worms and insects have a much larger surface area to body mass ratio, which lets them passively transfer oxygen into their bodies much more easily. I am by no means an entomologist but most ...


1

Look, I searched your question about the animals that bring to humans some "gifts" and the only thing I found, was only for the cats. So, if you are intrested check this : Cats are, first and foremost, natural-born hunters, as recent studies of the effects that feral and indoor-outdoor cats have on bird and rodent populations have shown. Cats allegedly ...


1

There are many scientific methods for that which are widely used in animal behavior studies, specifically in honey bees. Read this. If you search you can find similar for mice and rats also :P


1

When they are flying together as a flock, they anticipate the flock's behavior and react accordingly. earthsky.org/earth/how-do-flocking-birds-move-in-unison And when they are just flying around, but not in a flock, the concept is the same as how we humans don't collide into each other when we are walking. Although birds fly faster, they also see farther ...


1

Good question. I tried to find a few articles to validate my answer, but it would appear that very few professional studies have been done on the matter. One of my hobbies a few years back was ant keeping and I have had several colonies started from queens over the years, so I can share some of my personal experiences. Anyway, back to your question. For the ...


1

We can only observe correlations Let's just talk about statistics. You can see a correlation between two things only if there is variation for these two things. It therefore, make no sense to look at a single trait that has no variance and ask "is it genetically coded?". The only thing that makes sense is to understand what variables explain the observed ...


1

Not all animals are equally predisposed for domestication. To be easily domesticated, animal should have: Flexible diet - and not compete with humans for food Reasonably fast growth rate Ability to be bred in captivity Pleasant disposition Temperament which makes it unlikely to panic Modifiable social hierarchy Wikipedia link above has plenty of ...



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