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13

Like so much of biology, we just don't know! I'll preface this answer by disappointing you; this answer doesn't entirely answer your question. That's because this is a pretty big mystery in research and a fascinating topic. I'll start with a couple of quotes that maybe explain why! If you search on the Web of Science database for papers on the emotion ...


9

The behaviour that you describe is common in most animal species, as part of the natural trade-off between access to food, minimizing risk, habituation and hunger. Animals usually choose to forage in high-quality habitats that has a low risk of predation, but if food sources are depleted (or competition and/or territoriality is high) they will move to other ...


6

Lets break this question into parts and answer them one by one. Do tears really save us from harm? Well, yes. Tears, mucus and saliva contain an enzyme lysozyme that breaks down the cell wall of many bacteria. Those that are not killed immediately are trapped in mucus and swallowed.1 You can, obviously, search on google for another reference if you ...


6

This is not an area I know well, but I'm familiar with a couple of studies that have tried to estimate the heritable (genetic) component of homosexuality in humans. A review paper by Rice et al (2012) points out that: Pedigree and twin studies indicate that homosexuality has substantial heritability in both sexes, yet concordance between identical twins ...


4

They can't see all the birds that are around them as some are hidden behind the others. However, I don't think there is anything so extraordinary; they watch around, have good reflexes and can change direction very abruptly. There is no need for some kind of special sensing abilities to explain bird flocks. 3 simple rules One can simulate a flock of birds ...


4

In fact there are many cases of animals expressing a behaviour which benefit their predators, although it is controversial whether they "want" it. I mean arthropods and mammals infected with "mind-controlling" parasites. For example, an ant could become host of the liver fluke Dicrocoelium dendriticum. Then every night it would wait patiently on the top of a ...


4

Is it possible that an individual would benefit form being eaten? In theory it is possible that such behaviour would evolve. An individual may improve the probability of its genes to be passed on by letting a related individual (which carries similar gene variants) to feed on it. When counting the fitness of an individual as being the sum of the fitness of ...


4

Breathing during digging And if all that wasn’t enough responsibility for these claws, they also are used for digging. While most digging crabs use their back legs to burrow backwards into the sand, the shame-faced crab uses the claws like little bulldozers, excavating the sand forward so the crab sinks downward until it is completely covered by the ...


3

"Simple" insects like fruit flies can learn to associate odors with food, e.g. see here for a pretty classic example. Drosophila even show some kind of depression which is acquired. Their sexual experiences even shape their alcohol intake. You will find similar examples for other model organisms as well. So, yes, simple animals behave differently in ...


3

Nice question, I'll answer it in parts: Is it necessary for our body? Well, there can be many perspectives for why humans like singing. Let's talk about the evolutionary perspective first. I found three theories about why singing was evolutionarily beneficial for humans. The Shakespearean theory, that music is at least one of the foods of love, has a ...


3

The reason for this discrepancy is mainly a consequence of Bateman's principle. Citing wikipedia: Bateman's principle suggests that in most species, variability in reproductive success, or "reproductive variance," is greater in males than in females. This is ultimately a consequent of anisogamy. Females, especially mammalian females, almost always invest ...


3

It is not known for sure. But I find Hurley and Dennett's theory very convincing. Our brains are engaged full time in real-time (risky) heuristic search, generating presumtpions about what will be experienced next in every domain. This time-pressured, unsupervised generation process has necessarily lenient standards and introduces content - not all of ...


3

Short answer I think the author is mostly right, but there are exceptions. Background The author is probably referring to hunting as being an "active foraging" strategy, while he ascribes the foraging behavior of reptiles to be a "sit-and-wait" strategy. Active hunters include the classic, and dramatic high-speed, long-distance pursuit strategies deployed ...


2

At least two follow-up studies have investigated the behavioral consequences of the re-routing of the optic nerve to the auditory cortex. In these animals the visual cortices were ablated, and the optic nerve re-routed by combined lesions of the superior colliculus and ascending auditory pathways to the thalamus. These lesions induce retinal axons to form ...


2

I believe a lot of these behaviours can fall under the umbrella term of reciprocity, or reciprocal altruism. In evolutionary biology, reciprocal altruism is a behaviour whereby an organism acts in a manner that temporarily reduces its fitness while increasing another organism's fitness, with the expectation that the other organism will act in a ...


2

Why do we laugh? The leading research on why we laugh is done by Robert Provine. He has even written several books on the topic. His theory is that laughter was a primitve form of communication that evolved. For example,he and some graduate students listened in on average conversations in public places and made notes. And in a survey of 1,200 "laugh ...


2

Birds find their niches based on many reasons. Their choice is based on primarily resource availability, predation risk, and competition. Keep in mind there are variations among species, most birds like to forage for food at a hight safe enough to avoid ground predation, at the same time to be able to see and find food without much competition. Therefore ...


2

As expressed in the comments, the answer to this question depends on how you define 'hunting'. However, using common definitions in biology, hunting is almost used as a synonym to predation (see quoted definitions below). In that sense, the statement in your question is clearly incorrect, since it is describing the the foraging behaviours of predatory ...


2

Temperature affect pretty much all metabolic pathways. There are incentive in fishes as well to control their internal temperature. Control of Body temperature can be categorize along two axes, one concerning the source of heat and the other the magnitude of temperature variation. Please have a look at this post to understand the terms endo-, exo-, poikilo-,...


1

I'm only aware of two studies that have looked at Rock Pigeon home range size. Note that this isolated research and may not be representative of Rock Pigeons everywhere nor of other pigeon species. Rose and Nagel (2006) tracked 80 feral pigeons using GPS receivers and found 32% remained within 0.3 km of their roost location. Only 7.5% traveled over 2km ...


1

Physiologically speaking, your body is reacting to something you have known associations learning. An extreme form of this phenomenon is seen in drug addiction. After chronic use of a substance there are certain cues a person associates with the drug effects. Whether that be a certain group of people, a sound, a place, or an object the stimulant is ...


1

As the body mass of an organism decreases, their volume decreases exponentially, so their metabolic needs are also reduced. The result is that small organisms like worms and insects have a much larger surface area to body mass ratio, which lets them passively transfer oxygen into their bodies much more easily. I am by no means an entomologist but most ...


1

Look, I searched your question about the animals that bring to humans some "gifts" and the only thing I found, was only for the cats. So, if you are intrested check this : Cats are, first and foremost, natural-born hunters, as recent studies of the effects that feral and indoor-outdoor cats have on bird and rodent populations have shown. Cats allegedly ...


1

There are many scientific methods for that which are widely used in animal behavior studies, specifically in honey bees. Read this. If you search you can find similar for mice and rats also :P


1

When they are flying together as a flock, they anticipate the flock's behavior and react accordingly. earthsky.org/earth/how-do-flocking-birds-move-in-unison And when they are just flying around, but not in a flock, the concept is the same as how we humans don't collide into each other when we are walking. Although birds fly faster, they also see farther ...


1

Good question. I tried to find a few articles to validate my answer, but it would appear that very few professional studies have been done on the matter. One of my hobbies a few years back was ant keeping and I have had several colonies started from queens over the years, so I can share some of my personal experiences. Anyway, back to your question. For the ...



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