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46

A quick search on Web of Science yields "Polyphasic Wake/Sleep Episodes in the Fire Ant, Solenopsis Invicta" (Cassill et al., 2009, @Mike Taylor found an accessable copy here) as one of the first hits. The main points from the abstract: Yes, ants sleep. indicators of deep sleep: ants are non-responsive to contact by other ants and antennae are folded ...


30

The short answer is apparently yes. Studies on sleep in insects date back to papers published by Phil and Nellie Rau in 1916 and 1938. Hussaini et al. (2003) showed that sleep does affect memory formation in honey bees. They showed that retention of extinction learning is significantly reduced in bees that were sleep-deprived. More about sleep in honeybees ...


13

It is difficult to find a scientific answer to this question, but let me insert this citation from a specialist site: Contrary to popular belief, beaver cannot plan the direction in which trees will fall. Many trees become hung up in the branches of surrounding trees and are lost to the colony. In heavily forested areas, this loss may amount to one-half ...


9

The whole point about your question is to define what is an "evolved trait"? The concept of "evolved trait" does not exist in evolutionary biology. Here are various definitions I can think of that could apply to the expression "evolved traits". Heritable Traits Does evolved traits mean heritable traits? A trait may be heritable or not. See for example my ...


7

Probably not. An immediate defense against predators requires an immediate response. The sting of Hymenoptera like the wasps and bees has an immediately painful reaction. In addition, in the eusocial (colony-forming) species, multiple individuals typically contribute to defense of their nest. One sting may not deter a predator or invader but dozens or ...


5

Rumor has it that some moles, such as the star nosed mole, have electroreceptors in their nose. In 1993, Gould and colleagues proposed that the star-like proboscis had electroreceptors and that the mole was therefore able to sense the electrical field of its prey[24] prior to mechanical inspection by its appendages. Through behavioral experiments, they ...


4

It's not entirely clear what you're asking. If you're asking whether domestic animals are more friendly to humans than wild animals, the answer is generally yes. However, this does not make them "more evolved". Domestic and wild animals are ultimately derived from a shared common ancestor, so they have been evolving for an equal period of time. In ...


4

Domestication has little, if anything, to do with intelligence. From biologist Jared Diamond, the 6 criteria for domestication are as follows: Flexible diet – Creatures that are willing to consume a wide variety of food sources and can live off less cumulative food from the food pyramid (such as corn or wheat), particularly food that is not utilized ...


4

I believe it is a type of fission-fusion society or even some hybrid with agent based modeling. In ethology, a fission–fusion society is one in which the size and composition of the social group change as time passes and animals move throughout the environment; animals merge (fusion)—e.g. sleeping in one place—or split (fission)—e.g. foraging in small ...


4

I couldn't find any information about ants starving in times of plenty, most likely since it's difficult to determine whether an ant colony is "letting" certain members starve or whether the ants have just died for whatever reason. To your second question, though, yes! This paper, The Effect of Colony Size and Starvation on Food Flow in the Fire Ant by ...


4

This is a good question. This type of behavior -- pecking at a branch, wiping the side of the beak on a branch, pulling off twigs and dropping them, or knocking off pieces of bark -- is quite common among many corvid species, particularly when they are interrupted by something or someone that they might consider a threat. This includes not only potential ...


3

I will focus my answer on the evolution of orb web spiders (Fig. 1), because arachnids, like insects, are relatively non-complex creatures with an obvious systematic behavior (the weaving of highly symmetric, repeating structures). Hence I reasoned this would be a good approach of investigating the answer to this question. The orb-weavers (Orbiculariae, an ...


3

From this paper about black-headed gulls responding to a hedgehog: The gull might peck the intruder, or strike it with its feet. Pecks were mostly directed at the hedgehog's head and might be delivered after a horizontal approach with the wings partly lifted. Although not directed at the eyes specifically, they observed the birds directing attacks ...


3

The order of settling depends on the resource availability in different patches (in your case the difference between high and low quality habitat), but generally speaking, the pattern you observe conforms to the ideal free distribution. The key factor in the ideal free distribution is that habitat patches are filled according to the current resource ...


2

This stuff is hard-wired into either the organism's nervous system, or endocrine signalling pathways (e.g., hormones), or possibly a combination of those two mechanisms. In that sense, yes it is encoded in the genome, but not in a language that we can understand or interpret yet. Also, don't overlook all of the macromolecules that the female provides to the ...


2

Don't know whether it was ever investigated, but I'm pretty sure, that frogs can in principle swim upside down (e.g. when escaping from predator), but they normally do not do it. One example of alternative swimming styles in animals is provided by some munnopsidid isopod crustaceans. Several genera are pelagic and have very elongated forelegs equipped with ...


2

They can't see all the birds that are around them as some are hidden behind the others. However, there is nothing so extraordinary; they watch around, have good reflexes and can change direction very abruptly. There is no need for some kind of special sensing abilities to explain bird flocks. 3 simple rules One can simulate a flock of birds with 3 simples ...


1

Good question. I tried to find a few articles to validate my answer, but it would appear that very few professional studies have been done on the matter. One of my hobbies a few years back was ant keeping and I have had several colonies started from queens over the years, so I can share some of my personal experiences. Anyway, back to your question. For the ...


1

We can only observe correlations Let's just talk about statistics. You can see a correlation between two things only if there is variation for these two things. It therefore, make no sense to look at a single trait that has no variance and ask "is it genetically coded?". The only thing that makes sense is to understand what variables explain the observed ...


1

This is not a answer but rather a very long comment which obviously would not fit in the 600 characters limit of a comment. Welcome to Biology.SE. How to write a good post I think it is not a good habit to write about personal stories on a science site. It makes your post not very attracting to people who could answer. You should also avoid sentence ...


1

I will assume that you are talking about Mallards, although other wildfowl are likely to exhibit similar behaviors. Mallards aren't actually solitary during the summer, instead they form breeding pairs. They form groups (sords) in the winter to migrate and for protection while moulting. ...


1

"More intelligent" as more capable of learning Domesticated varieties of animals generally aren't "smarter" as per objective measurements of brain power, however, I'd argue that they would feel smarter for us because they have different patterns of learning. For most living beings, there is a general shift of the "explore vs exploit" behavior balance as ...


1

I can suggest three books, none of them cover all those aspects, though: 1) The Foundations of Ethology, Konrad Lorenz. The best introduction I know for the field of ethology. Lorenz is called by some "the father of ethology". 2) Sociobiology: The New Synthesis, Edward Wilson. The deepest study of animal societies I know of. 3) Evolutionary Ecology, Eric ...


1

Mimicry, in biology, phenomenon characterized by the superficial resemblance of two or more organisms that are not closely related taxonomically. This resemblance confers an advantage—such as protection from predation—upon one or both organisms through some form of “information flow” that passes between the organisms and the animate agent of selection. This ...


1

It's got to be because optical mirrors are relatively easy to produce and field, and it's obvious that it presents a duplicate. I would be interested in designs for a 'sound mirror' that doesn't just look like a wall under echolocation. Maybe a system to dynamically reproduce a 'sound hologram' of the bat? A 'scent mirror' would be really difficult to ...


1

Here are my thoughts. An animal does not chose to emit some light while they have more control over other signals they emit and may likely just not emit it. So it would not be an easy trait to study. More importantly, animals (almost) always receive feedback for signals they emit. When a dog barks, it can hear itself! Animals are not used to receive ...


1

Predators are very good at spotting moving targets, as movements will easily stand out from inanimate objects and vegetation. Most prey will prefer to hide or just run if they are spotted by predators. But the chameleons prefer to blend in with the vegetation instead. This gives them the advantage that they may move in plain sight, and still not be ...


1

Yes, creatures can swim different ways. If you drop a frog into water while it is in the ventral up position, it will indeed swim upside down to escape before righting itself, which occurs by rotating while swimming. If the water is too shallow, it will flop and flip before jumping away. Swimming on the surface ventral side up is kind of silly for a frog ...


1

While it's widely believed snakes have primitive emotions such as fear, anger, and ,to a lesser degree, pleasure, no one is sure beyond that. Many snake enthusiasts would argue that snakes show more emotion then widely accepted, with studies showing snakes(along with other reptiles) have personalities, though less complex then humans, making it possible for ...


1

Not all animals are equally predisposed for domestication. To be easily domesticated, animal should have: Flexible diet - and not compete with humans for food Reasonably fast growth rate Ability to be bred in captivity Pleasant disposition Temperament which makes it unlikely to panic Modifiable social hierarchy Wikipedia link above has plenty of ...



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