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Domestication has little, if anything, to do with intelligence. From biologist Jared Diamond, the 6 criteria for domestication are as follows: Flexible diet – Creatures that are willing to consume a wide variety of food sources and can live off less cumulative food from the food pyramid (such as corn or wheat), particularly food that is not utilized ...


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It's got to be because optical mirrors are relatively easy to produce and field, and it's obvious that it presents a duplicate. I would be interested in designs for a 'sound mirror' that doesn't just look like a wall under echolocation. Maybe a system to dynamically reproduce a 'sound hologram' of the bat? A 'scent mirror' would be really difficult to ...


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Mimicry, in biology, phenomenon characterized by the superficial resemblance of two or more organisms that are not closely related taxonomically. This resemblance confers an advantage—such as protection from predation—upon one or both organisms through some form of “information flow” that passes between the organisms and the animate agent of selection. This ...


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Here are my thoughts. An animal does not chose to emit some light while they have more control over other signals they emit and may likely just not emit it. So it would not be an easy trait to study. More importantly, animals (almost) always receive feedback for signals they emit. When a dog barks, it can hear itself! Animals are not used to receive ...


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The mirror test is definitely useful, but clearly biased toward animals with social intelligence (a notion of self is only useful if there's a notion of other) and also toward highly visual animals. A mole-rat, no matter how intelligent, is unlikely to use a mirror for much of anything. Using the same test for animals with very different sensory modalities ...



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