Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I think the piece of missing information here is the distinction between macro-nutrients and micro-nutrients.* The info from Mayo clinic quoted in the another answer addresses some reasons why whole foods might be better than pills for obtaining micronutrients (i.e. vitamins and minerals). While this may be true, most of it remains to be conclusively ...


2

No flavodiiron proteins are not haem proteins. See here for a simple depiction. Basically there is a flavin, and there are two iron atoms which go through a FeII/FeIII cycle during catalytic activity. These iron atoms are not held in haem, but rather via carboxylate ligands.


2

No, Hemes are not proteins. They are porphyrins (large organic molecules) which are composed of four pyrrolic groups linked together. In the middle the coordinate the iron atom which is responsible for the activity. The combination of heme and iron is called a prosthetic group or co-factor. They are bound by the protein. The image shows the Heme B from ...


4

There are literally millions of biomolecules. Some of them we know the structures and chemical properties of others we know nothing about. I'm going to focus on sugars. It would be too broad a question probably even to list all biomolecules, much less describe how their chemical synthesis would be performed. The good news is that industrial ...


4

There are already many great answers to your question, however I thought I put my comments in form of an answer. The standard for DNA agarose gel is TAE and for the protein, it depends on the size of the protein and the gel type used! Some times MOPS works best and sometimes Tris-acetate works best. It really depends on the gel used and also the protein and ...


4

Grossly, it does not matter what buffer you use. It is the pH that matters. For DNA electrophoresis EDTA is added in order to chelate divalent cations that serve as cofactors for nucleases. Tris is the base of the buffer and is used to set pH. Along with Tris one can use Boric acid, Acetic acid or phosphoric acid for adjusting the pH. The buffering range ...


4

The question which buffer for DNA is better is quite old. Both have their pros and cons and I list a few of them: TBE is a better conductor and is thus less prone for overheating the gel Borate is a powerful enzyme inhibitor, so if you want to apply enzymatic steps downstream, TAE is the better choice TAE gives a better resolution for large fragments TBE ...


1

In a coupled reaction energy required by 1 process is supplied by another process. For example: glucose + phosphate becomes glucose.6.phosphate. This is an endergonic reaction and the energy is supplied to this reaction by another reaction which has to be exergonic reaction i.e. ATP which can become ADP+energy.


2

What you are looking for sounds like the mechanism for a fold-change detector. I would recommend looking at these two papers: The incoherent feedforward loop can provide fold-change detection in gene regulation As an example of this working in a real system, I recommend looking at the NFkB pathway, as recently detailed by Suzanne Gaudet: Fold Change of ...


4

I have had good experience using a lithium boric acid buffer from Faster Better Media. I use it for RNA gels, but it's advertised for DNA gels. I don't think it can do protein, but I've never tried it. I'm not an electrician, but higher conductivity may be the opposite of what you want. The lithium boric acid buffer claims to have less conductivity than a ...


1

Let's do your second one first, you want to find the rate of binding: Yes you are right you need to calculate for km I think I found the paper that ties temp into the reaction rate: statistical approach called response surface methodology (RSM) is used for the prediction of the kinetic constants of glucose oxidase (GOx) as a function of reaction ...


3

Lead acts as a poison in a variety ways relative to what tissue it is exposed to. For example, lead is able to pass through the blood-brain barrier where it can act act as Calcium homolog to interfere with neurotransmitter release. In the blood, Lead inhibits porphobilogen synthase, an enzyme required for heme synthesis. Lead's toxicity mechanisms include: ...


2

If your looking at transcription then your talking about RNA POLYMERASE. And there are many variants. Here's a good Nature paper that discusses temperature and RNA Pol http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v1/n6/full/ncomms1076.html And another: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12729734/ I couldn't get full access to this JBC paper but I think the ...


0

In fact the line that you quote doesn't mean that the solution is formulated to be identical to the cytosol. All that it means is that the solution should be buffered to physiological pH (typically slightly alkaline); should contain a relatively high concentration of sodium ions and a low concentration of potassium ions; and should be isotonic (i.e have the ...


3

This sounds straightforward when thinking about it but finding hard evidence is not really easy. As this is too long for a comment, I have to put it in as an answer. Just a few thoughts: All enzymatic reactions are of course temperature dependent and usually have a temperature optimum at the specific living temperatures. For yeast this is around 27°C, for ...


2

Why can't we just create a pill that does have all the necessary components? I'm assuming you mean micronutrients (vitamins & minerals). A day's worth of macronutrients (energy and building-block providing chemicals - proteins, fats, sugars) are already very abundant and dense - a pill containing a day's worth would be the size of an egg. ...


-2

No one would like to eat a pill when we've been genetically selected for millennia to salivate at the small of roast beef. Our stomachs tell us we are full only when they are distended - try getting that with a pill. Therefore there is not much of a market for pills that will fully replace food. Unfortunately, there are some people "working" on a food ...


2

This is more of a biochemistry question and to be honest its a little bit out of my league because I have not had the necessary grad classes to explain nutrition but indeed I will try. Unknown metabolite cofactors and things like ionization, oxidation and state of matter are the reason that straight up vitamins are rejected by the body and cause really ...


1

If the ladder is on an edge of the gel, it may be a process of different density as a result of how the gel cooled (or was poured too slowly). I've loaded more DNA loaded in a gel and it doesn't cause this kind of warping for me. It may be the buffer of the ladder is different from that used to make the gel. Your bands don't look particularly sharp, so I ...


2

I actually doubt that the pectinase has such a broad pH range in which it works optimally. Searching the web I found two figures which support my doubts: The first is from an article ("Immobilization of pectinase by adsorption on an alginate-coated chitin support") which compares the activity of native and immobilized pectinase under different ...


2

Teflon® is a brand name for a man-made chemical known as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and it has been used since 1940s (discovered by DuPont Co.). Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, also known as C8) is another man-made chemical and it is used in the process of making Teflon and similar chemicals (known as fluorotelomers), although it is burned off during the ...


1

see here. y-intercept = $\frac{1}{V_{max}}$ To convert absorbance to concentration, plot the standard curve and get the linear relationship between the two quantities. Make sure that the line that you fit (for standard curve) passes through origin.



Top 50 recent answers are included