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16

In many cases, and in particular in marine invertebrates, the bioluminescence is in fact produced by symbiotic bacteria of the Vibrionaceae family. In most cases the bacteria can sense when they are being hosted by the animal through quorum sensing mechanisms, and start producing light. The evolutionary pressure for the bacteria to produce light is to be ...


13

From the article you linked: virtually all living organisms emit extremely weak light, spontaneously without external photoexcitation. This biophoton emission is categorized in different phenomena of light emission from bioluminescence, and is believed to be a by-product of biochemical reactions in which excited molecules are produced from bioenergetic ...


9

You are looking for a bioluminescence imaging device. These have very sensitive CCD camera and exposure times are around 5 minutes in complete darkness.


6

Bioluminescence, in particular in marine organisms, has also been linked to way to get rid of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In fact, luciferases catalyse the photogenic oxydation of luciferins. In [1], the authors propose that this system's function was primarily for antioxydation, while in deep seas, where the water is oxygen-poor, the lower selective ...


4

Yes and no. Yes as in the energetics do work out and you will be going down a small but non-trivial driving force as long as you continue to provide the luciferin to the algae. However, the wavelengths of light by which photosynthesis absorbs its energy are well defined and narrow. As a result, light sources for photosynthetic organisms have to be fairly ...


4

You'll also want to make sure that you are imaging in complete darkness because you may have very low photon emission from your luciferase system and any amount of background light can overwhelm your signal with noise.


2

Here is a report addressing this, I haven't read it in detail, but I've skimmed it and it looks like they've done a pretty good job, and address a number of key points, talk about the emission spectra of certain organisms, etc. Bioluminescence – a source of marine energy? From the conclusion: "The low light output of bioluminescent species relative to solar ...


1

Almost certainly. In the deep-sea, some species of laternfishes (Myctophidae) show sexual dimorphism in their light organs. Males have large light organs. The females are much smaller. Here is a brief summary, based on an interview with Dr. John Sparks at the American Museum of Natural History. Sparks is discussing his recent publication with colleagues ...


1

Go for the link below, you will find an article on "How do marine bacteria produce light, why are they luminescent, and can we employ bacterial bioluminescence in aquatic biotechnology?" www.biology-online.org/articles/marine_bacteria_produce_light/abstract.html From this article : The question remains whether quorum sensing regulation of bacterial ...



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