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Cells absolutely can be considered as diffusing objects. However, the origin of the "diffusion" can be very different than for, say, a bead in water. The reason is that the thermal motion that creates the diffusion of a micron-sized bead can be much less important for a (large) cell. For instance, the diffusion coefficient due to thermal forces of a ...


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No, the mass-energy convertibility has no practical relevance to biology. The amount of mass produced or lost in the chemical reactions in biological systems is so small as to be immeasurable and is ignored for biological purposes (other than the conversions which happen as consumed radioactive elements decay). One needs a nuclear reactor, atom bomb, or ...


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No, it is not. There are no nuclear fission or fusion reactions being performed in a biological context, for reasons that should be immediately obvious. Mass is not being converted to energy, or vice versa, when we generate heat or create or break chemical bonds. Biological systems are covered by the laws of the conservation of mass and energy, so kgin $=$ ...


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Short answer Any law of physics will of course be applicable to living beings. However, in the absence of mass gain and mass loss, the input = output equation for matter holds true and does not require any spontaneous creation and destruction of matter to equate. In other words, the effects of Einstein's discovery has no measurable/practical consequence on ...



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