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"Simple" insects like fruit flies can learn to associate odors with food, e.g. see here for a pretty classic example. Drosophila even show some kind of depression which is acquired. Their sexual experiences even shape their alcohol intake. You will find similar examples for other model organisms as well. So, yes, simple animals behave differently in ...


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You say depending on what happened to them. The expression "what happened to them" is so broad that the answer is necessarily yes. I am giving a few very obvious examples. If you give royal jelly to a bee larvea, it will drastically affect its morphology and behaviour. So yes, presence of royal jelly will affect their future behaviour. If you cut all the ...


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The different models that can be used to fit the curves do differ. The linked paper and this website outline the differences; the discussion revolves around an R package called DRC but much of the information is generally applicable. Modelling can also be used to estimate ED50. The parameters and models that are being used need to be consistent with the ...


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Preprocessing will and should always depend upon the biology that you try to answer or discover (e.g.: There might be an experimental rationale to believe that some genes behave differently in individual samples - and that different samples could possibly have different distributions.) log-transforming your data by itself is usually no problem, and hugely ...


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From personal experience, nearly all count data whether from microarray or reads from RNAseq of some kind, requires a log transformation of the counts. Usually a small fraction is added to all values before doing so to zero protect. Log2(counts + 0.5) or some such. This is independent of the treatments. If you log transform one sample, you will do the same ...



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