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There are already many great answers to your question, however I thought I put my comments in form of an answer. The standard for DNA agarose gel is TAE and for the protein, it depends on the size of the protein and the gel type used! Some times MOPS works best and sometimes Tris-acetate works best. It really depends on the gel used and also the protein and ...


4

Grossly, it does not matter what buffer you use. It is the pH that matters. For DNA electrophoresis EDTA is added in order to chelate divalent cations that serve as cofactors for nucleases. Tris is the base of the buffer and is used to set pH. Along with Tris one can use Boric acid, Acetic acid or phosphoric acid for adjusting the pH. The buffering range ...


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The question which buffer for DNA is better is quite old. Both have their pros and cons and I list a few of them: TBE is a better conductor and is thus less prone for overheating the gel Borate is a powerful enzyme inhibitor, so if you want to apply enzymatic steps downstream, TAE is the better choice TAE gives a better resolution for large fragments TBE ...


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I have had good experience using a lithium boric acid buffer from Faster Better Media. I use it for RNA gels, but it's advertised for DNA gels. I don't think it can do protein, but I've never tried it. I'm not an electrician, but higher conductivity may be the opposite of what you want. The lithium boric acid buffer claims to have less conductivity than a ...


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I actually doubt that the pectinase has such a broad pH range in which it works optimally. Searching the web I found two figures which support my doubts: The first is from an article ("Immobilization of pectinase by adsorption on an alginate-coated chitin support") which compares the activity of native and immobilized pectinase under different ...


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So, your blank is everything but the enzyme? That is, substrate and DNSA with 100 uL water? If yes, measure, as negative controls, substrate alone and DNSA alone. If one of them is also highly absorbing light, it may be contaminated, and a new vial should be ordered. If both are highly absorbing, it may be the water you are using, or the spectrophotometer. ...



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