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10

Some that just come to mind, in random order: One cannot skip reading: Richard Dawkins - The selfish gene And, obviously: Charles Darwin - The Origin of Species And, for those interested in the evolution of the brain (and its quirks): David J Linden - The Accidental Mind Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat Not very ...


9

A Biologist's guide to mathematical modeling in evolution and ecology (Otto) is a very good book that is presented for people that have highschool level in mathematics (It makes a good review in linear algebra for example). It is highly accessible and in the meantime it goes pretty far as it ends up talking about the application of diffusion equation in ...


7

A good recollection of the early days of micro and molecular biology is "The Eighth day of Creation" It covers the early use of e. coli, the discovery of phage, transcriptional elements and the impact that DNA structure had. It's very comprehensive and really useful if you are doing molecular biology today.


7

@Remi.b's list is excellent, but it should also include Gillespie's Population Genetics: A Concise Guide.


5

It doesn't have very many reviews, but The Epic History of Biology sounds like it's perfect. Flipping through the first chapter in the preview, it doesn't seem overly technical in any way, so secondary school-level knowledge is probably enough. If your associates have absolutely no biology experience, perhaps a run through a popular press book would ...


5

Where I studied, every undergrad read Campbell Biology. You can start it as a non-specialist but you will not be one at the end..


4

I would recommend The selfish gene by Richard Dawkins. It is targeted at a scientifically interested audience, but well written and recognized by the scientific community. http://amzn.com/0199291152


4

A fantastic book that covers the evolution of modern science since the Renaissance (including a great deal of biology) is The Scientists by John Gribbin. I found that by focusing on the people doing the science in the context of the society in which they lived, I got a much better understanding for why early scientists thought the way they did and researched ...


4

MathsBio is quite a large field. It is an interdisciplinary branch having utility in a lot of branches in biology like biophysics, biomedical, genetics and molecular biology. Applied Mathematics is generally used in modelling and understanding biological phenomena where we have to deal with large amount of data, for example the use of graph theory for ...


4

What you are describing usually falls under the category of computational biology or just mathematical biology. Unfortunately, the biggest part of this field is bioinformatics, or the application of statistical and/or dynamical programming techniques to sequence data. You exclude this in your question, and I would agree with you that it is a "boring" topic ...


4

Probably the best source to start would be Ilkka Hanksi's work, you can find a full list here: http://www.helsinki.fi/science/metapop/People/IlkkaPub2.htm. The seminal work would be "Ecology, Genetics and Evolution of Metapopulations" It gives a strong mathematical treatment


4

This book "A primer of conservation genetics" would suit quite well I think. In particular chapter five deals with "Genetics and Extinction" and is preceded by a lot of population genetics based theory. A beginner might also combine it with "A primer of ecological genetics" (Hartl & Conner) but you seem to have enough Pop gen knowledge to not need it! ...


4

This is a tough topic, have a look at the following references and see, if they can help you: Structural modelling and dynamics of proteins for insights into drug interactions. Ligand entry pathways in the ligand binding domain of PPARĪ³ receptor Pathway and mechanism of drug binding to G-protein-coupled receptors Molecular Dynamic Simulation and Inhibitor ...


4

I can highly recommend Kandel's "Principles of neural science". I have not had any biology courses since highschool, but I was able to understand it well. It is really a book meant to teach. The style is beginner friendly, and not tedious/boring at all. It is an expensive buy and a very long read (I think the paper version is close to 2000 pages), but ...


3

By far the best book I've read on the history of biology is A Guinea Pig's History of Biology, by Jim Endersby. It tells the history of the field by focusing on experimental organisms and the contributions which were made by studying them. It has an engaging narrative style and the idea of focussing on organisms' stories is an excellent and original one. ...


3

Systems biology and bioinformatics are quite diverse subjects, but here are some options: Biological Sequence Analysis by Durbin et al.: the classic bioinformatics text for people with a CS background. Does not deal with networks. An Introduction to Systems Biology by Uri Alon: A physicist's view of systems biology, focusing on design principles and ...


3

One of the quickest ways to get oriented on what is going in the world of protein folding and modeling is to look at the proceedings of the Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP). CASP is basically a contest, held every 2 years where anyone can use their algorithm to predict the 3D structure of a protein whose structure is known, but not ...


3

I just came across Understanding Biotechnology. There is one very positive and one very negative review. I haven't read the book myself, but it looks that it is exactly what I was looking for: the table of content includes topics like small history overview, genetic engineering, gene therapy, pharmacogenomics, etc. It might be even useful for people with ...


3

You either want a introductory book in evolutionary biology or a book that provide models/formulations of evolutionary processes In my first class of evolutionary biology I had this textbook: Futuyama, Evolution I think it gives a good start to the field and offers a good overview of the difference subfields. If you think you already knows enough about the ...


3

If you're interested in learning about the mathematics of population genetics, Population Genetics and Microevolutionary Theory by Alan Templeton is an absolutely amazing resource. If you check out the index, here are entries under population structure: assortative mating, admixture, linkage disequilibrium, coarse-grained spatial heterogeneity, gene flow, ...


3

The Campbell Biology is a good very introductory book to biology. However, it is popular book but a very standard text book. I am not aware of any popular and introductory book that are broad enough to encompass all of biology. I would suggest that you get the campbell and in parallel you can follow free online courseware. There are lots of them. Starting ...


3

I would suggest something like "The Selfish Gene" by Richard Dawkins. It covers many examples or organisms and how their behaviour at a molecular level is ultimately selfish in order to ensure survival by passing their genes, which is perhaps the most important biological function of any living organism. However, as pointed in comments below, this book ...


3

Absolutely, the two I've had the most success are working with a radiolabeled and a fluorescently labeled version of the drug. Many drugs autofluoresce as well and this can be easily tracked. When it's labeled as mentioned above microscopy or a luminometer, spectrophomoter or a scintillation counter can evaluate fractions or whole cells, or purified ...


3

As @metacompactness said in the comments, the campbell (9th edition) is available and free in pdf online (here). Otherwise take advantage of free online resources such as khan academy. Online resources There are some very good online resources to get an introduction to biology. I think that online resources might have the drawback that they may miss the ...


3

Molecular Cloning is updated and in its 4th edition. Every lab used to have it. Its comprehensive, but really no book could be complete.


2

I don't know very many books that might be referred to as the Grand History of Biology or anything like that. That's...a big topic. Really big. How about some suggestions for good Biology/Medical History books accessible to lay people: And the Band Played On, by Randy Shilts, an account of the beginning of the AIDS epidemic in the U.S. The Great Influenza, ...


2

My two favorite books are Molecular Biology made simple and fun and Biotechnology for Beginners. Both are well written and fun to read. As their names suggest, the former covers the basics of biology and the latter covers the basics of biotechnology.


2

This book, although a little dated, has given me an incredible appreciation of biology that I never gained in school: What is Life? by Erwin Shrodinger I am not a biologist, but I occasionally work on mathematical-biology and have training in physics and theoretical computer science. This book was much more accessible to me that other books on biology. ...


2

I think this book (The Story of Life, Southwood) would be just what you are looking for - it was one of my modules during my undergrad in Evolution and I think it touches on the basic geology too. It is quite an easy ready but covers the material pretty well, it also has good reviews on Amazon etc.


2

I would suggest: Koneman's Color Atlas and Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology by Elmer W. Konema



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