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10

Some that just come to mind, in random order: One cannot skip reading: Richard Dawkins - The selfish gene And, obviously: Charles Darwin - The Origin of Species And, for those interested in the evolution of the brain (and its quirks): David J Linden - The Accidental Mind Oliver Sacks - The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat Not very ...


7

A good recollection of the early days of micro and molecular biology is "The Eighth day of Creation" It covers the early use of e. coli, the discovery of phage, transcriptional elements and the impact that DNA structure had. It's very comprehensive and really useful if you are doing molecular biology today.


5

It doesn't have very many reviews, but The Epic History of Biology sounds like it's perfect. Flipping through the first chapter in the preview, it doesn't seem overly technical in any way, so secondary school-level knowledge is probably enough. If your associates have absolutely no biology experience, perhaps a run through a popular press book would ...


4

A fantastic book that covers the evolution of modern science since the Renaissance (including a great deal of biology) is The Scientists by John Gribbin. I found that by focusing on the people doing the science in the context of the society in which they lived, I got a much better understanding for why early scientists thought the way they did and researched ...


4

MathsBio is quite a large field. It is an interdisciplinary branch having utility in a lot of branches in biology like biophysics, biomedical, genetics and molecular biology. Applied Mathematics is generally used in modelling and understanding biological phenomena where we have to deal with large amount of data, for example the use of graph theory for ...


3

By far the best book I've read on the history of biology is A Guinea Pig's History of Biology, by Jim Endersby. It tells the history of the field by focusing on experimental organisms and the contributions which were made by studying them. It has an engaging narrative style and the idea of focussing on organisms' stories is an excellent and original one. ...


3

Systems biology and bioinformatics are quite diverse subjects, but here are some options: Biological Sequence Analysis by Durbin et al.: the classic bioinformatics text for people with a CS background. Does not deal with networks. An Introduction to Systems Biology by Uri Alon: A physicist's view of systems biology, focusing on design principles and ...


3

One of the quickest ways to get oriented on what is going in the world of protein folding and modeling is to look at the proceedings of the Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP). CASP is basically a contest, held every 2 years where anyone can use their algorithm to predict the 3D structure of a protein whose structure is known, but not ...


3

I would recommend The selfish gene by Richard Dawkins. It is targeted at a scientifically interested audience, but well written and recognized by the scientific community. http://amzn.com/0199291152


3

I just came across Understanding Biotechnology. There is one very positive and one very negative review. I haven't read the book myself, but it looks that it is exactly what I was looking for: the table of content includes topics like small history overview, genetic engineering, gene therapy, pharmacogenomics, etc. It might be even useful for people with ...


3

What you are describing usually falls under the category of computational biology or just mathematical biology. Unfortunately, the biggest part of this field is bioinformatics, or the application of statistical and/or dynamical programming techniques to sequence data. You exclude this in your question, and I would agree with you that it is a "boring" topic ...


3

Probably the best source to start would be Ilkka Hanksi's work, you can find a full list here: http://www.helsinki.fi/science/metapop/People/IlkkaPub2.htm. The seminal work would be "Ecology, Genetics and Evolution of Metapopulations" It gives a strong mathematical treatment


2

I don't know very many books that might be referred to as the Grand History of Biology or anything like that. That's...a big topic. Really big. How about some suggestions for good Biology/Medical History books accessible to lay people: And the Band Played On, by Randy Shilts, an account of the beginning of the AIDS epidemic in the U.S. The Great Influenza, ...


2

My two favorite books are Molecular Biology made simple and fun and Biotechnology for Beginners. Both are well written and fun to read. As their names suggest, the former covers the basics of biology and the latter covers the basics of biotechnology.


2

This book, although a little dated, has given me an incredible appreciation of biology that I never gained in school: What is Life? by Erwin Shrodinger I am not a biologist, but I occasionally work on mathematical-biology and have training in physics and theoretical computer science. This book was much more accessible to me that other books on biology. ...


2

I think this book (The Story of Life, Southwood) would be just what you are looking for - it was one of my modules during my undergrad in Evolution and I think it touches on the basic geology too. It is quite an easy ready but covers the material pretty well, it also has good reviews on Amazon etc.


2

Have you looked into "Fundamental of Molecular Evolution" by Dan Graur & Li. Another suggestion in line of population genetics and different evo. theories would be - Evolutionary Genetics: Concepts and Case studies (Multi-author book. Editor Fox & Wolf)


2

The MCM's book is good one. I recommend the book BRS Microbiology and Immunology, because then you can see the thing in the real context and have good exercises too. First Aid for the USMLES Step 1 then explains you how to read for immunology and gives you rather good summary about the topic and some mnemonics.


2

Cellular and Molecular Immunology Abul K. Abbas MBBS (Author), Andrew H. H. Lichtman MD PhD (Author), Shiv Pillai MD (Author) This was my Fall 2011 Basic Immunology text for a hybrid med-school/undergrad class at my University. I have not read others, but every time the topic of Immune responses comes up in other Undergrad courses, I have been well or ...


2

I found the Campbell Biology textbook to be quite comprehensive and approachable. I think many introductory biology courses use it. http://www.amazon.com/Campbell-Biology-Edition-Jane-Reece/dp/0321558235


2

A Biologist's guide to mathematical modeling in evolution and ecology (Otto) is a very good book that is presented for people that have highschool level in mathematics (It makes a good review in linear algebra for example). It is highly accessible and in the meantime it goes pretty far as it ends up talking about the application of diffusion equation in ...


1

There are tons of books and it is quite hard that gives such a broad overview. Here is a book that basically covered the first year of my Bachelor degree in biology. I am not sure it would be very stimulating though! If there is a specific branch of biology that interests you, let us know we'll be able to give you a better advice. As a math Major you might ...


1

I really like "A Biologist's Guide to Mathematical Modeling in Ecology and Evolution" by Sarah P. Otto & Troy Day, although it's more specific to Biology and Evolution - which may have been the first field in biology to use mathematics.


1

I haven't read through all of it, but from the second edition, which I found available online here, it seems to me that it might be a good introduction, but (as expected from the publishing date) it is really missing out on all the next generation sequencing stuff. Which is important, not only because it is my favourite field. I am not sure what you want to ...


1

For a really brief introduction, I recommend the 37 page paper Bioinformatics - An Introduction for Computer Scientists by Jacques Cohen. It is a well written text, assuming some knowledge about algorithms, computing and maths, but not about biology. It helped me a lot getting comfortable with the field. Afterwards, I'd stick to Durbin's "Biological ...


1

I second these two I used both and liked them overall: Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics by Jonathan Pevsner An Introduction to Bioinformatics Algorithms by Neil C. Jones and Pavel A. Pevzner


1

For my bioinformatics class a few years ago, we used these: Fundamental Concepts of Bioinformatics - Krane and Raymer Was excellent as an intro text. Explained a lot of the biological concepts while it was teaching you the methods. Useful either for biologists or computer scientists bridging into bioinformatics. Statistical Methods in Bioinformatics - ...


1

LIFE : The Science of Biology by Sadava & Hills & Hellar & Berenbaum


1

I used Zoology by Miller and Harley in my undergraduate years and I found it to be an engaging, informative text book.


1

I've had some experience with Karen Strier's 'Primate Behavioural Ecology', and it's solid. It's a nice overview with (obviously) a strong ecology/ethology bent. I don't think it comes in ebook though. Here's the Amazon link.



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