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36

The phenomenon in question is probably related to geotropism. If the hill soil is "on the move" it will cause the bend on the trees - If the soil in a slope is moving downward, the trees on this slope will tip downward. As the tree continues to try to grow upward, the trunk will show a curve. The degree of bending could indicate the rate or ...


14

The plant is of Lamiaceae family and its common name is Shell Flower or Bells of Ireland. Its "scientific" aka latin name is Moluccella laevis.


8

As @dd3 stated, it's a spiny (or prickly) sow thistle. It's an annual common in most of the US. The leaf itself does not have a stem, and if you break the central stalk, it should be hollow and there should be a milky exudate. The plant spreads by fluffy seeds produced from a small dandelion-like flower. If you pick it while young, it won't hurt (as much); ...


7

The University of California, LA mentions some genera and species of salt-loving plants (halophytes): The genus Atriplex (Family Chenopodiaceae), saltbush, is found worldwide along saline shorelines. On the surfaces of the leaf are vesiculated trichomes (hairs). Each trichome has a stalk and a balloon-like tip, the bladder cell. The leaves use the bladder ...


7

Those are known as Rhododendrons, and I'd ID that one as R. hodgsonii.


7

Looks like a Hyoscyamus niger also called stinking nightshade.


7

It's a bit early yet, but it looks very much like a weed known in my area as "cleavers" or "clingweed" (Galium aparine) because of it's tiny stiff hairs which make it catch and cling to clothing. The picture below is for a fully mature plant, which is stiffer and stickier than when they first sprout. Note the whorl arrangement of (usually six) leaves, with ...


6

That is a kind of honeysuckle. The picture below is for Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), but your specimen is different in the way the flowers are arranged and that the distal-most paired leaves are clasping the stem. It might be Lionicera periclymenum, or Lonicera etrusca (there are about 150 species of honeysuckle); L. etrusca is pictured below ...


5

One thing to remember when you uproot a plant is that some of the smallest structures break off most readily. What you will usually see after uprooting the plant are the largest parts of the root structure, but there are often smaller parts which have broken off. Root structure is highly variable, but the general idea is that one or more primary trunk-like ...


5

Was it Pando? Pando is a single, massive 80,000 year old Populus tremuloides (quaking aspen) individual, that is assumed to have a single, massive root system covering 106 acres.


5

Welcome to Biology.SE! About your title Let me first react to your title: Viruses selected by evolution. Evolution is any process of genetic (and eventually phenotypic) change in a population through time. Selection (Natural Selection for example) is one of such process. Genetic drift is another such process. So, evolution don't select viruses. Viruses ...


5

Yes, it is possible, but not necessarily the case. Non-green leaves with chlorophyl: There are leaves that don't appear green, but do have chlorophyl and therefore can conduct photosynthesis. (See, for instance, refraction effects in white caladiums or the link in the answer by Resonating). Non-green leaves without chlorophyl: There are leaves that don't ...


4

Araucaria araucana is an evergreen. The pictured "fruit" is actually more of a cone (which I don't think you'd want to eat). However, the seeds are edible, and look like this: Let the cone dry and it should open up.


4

That molecule is called Geosmin. It is mainly produced 1 by Actinomycetes such as Streptomyces; filamentous bacteria that live in soil. Other organisms also produce geosmin: Cyanobacteria Certain fungi An amoeba called Vanella A liverwort It is an intracellular metabolite and cell damage was the primary reason attributed to its release. However oxidant ...


3

Born and raised in Texas here. I think people have a hard time comprehending the size of Texas. It has every climate (except extreme cold) and terrain. The coast is tropical and humid. The west is hot and dry desert. The central part is lush hills. The east side is forest, thick forest (see piney woods and Big Thicket)


3

I think your vegetable is a leek, or a closely related allium. If this is the case, you are seeing its flowerbud. Congratulations, it will become quite pretty in some days, I know people who use leeks as decoration plants instead of vegetables.


3

It is one of the many species and hybrids of Clematis that is grown in gardens. It looks similar to the common Clematis alpina but might be a closely related species or à hybrid. (Picture of C. alpina fr.o.m. Wikipedia)


3

They do have chlorophyll, at least in general. There are a couple very rare exceptions, but if it can stand up on its own, it contains chlorophyll. The green is just washed out by a very bright red pigment.


3

I think there aren't any, with two tentative positive results. Of course, it is hard to prove a negative. But here are my arguments: Logic. there is little reason for this to happen. A culinary fruit is supposed to be sweet, and plants tend to store sugars in their botanical fruits, not in other parts (although by this logic, there should be tuber-fruits ...


3

Vegetarian capsules are made of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (also called hypromellose). The cellulose from which this material is prepared is usually from tree fiber, commonly from pine or poplar species (as noted here).


2

The grain of corn is known as a caryopsis, which Merriam-Webster defines as: a small one-seeded dry indehiscent fruit (as of corn or wheat) in which the fruit and seed fuse in a single grain This image by Encyclopedia Britannica shows that the corn seed, enclosed by the seed coat (testa) is then further surrounded by the pericarp, which consists of ...


2

The structure you are relating to is a seam (suture). This seam is formed during development of a carpel. The indentation of the seam varies and depends on the climate and environment: for example, water stress will give a very deep suture -


1

The phenomenon you are observing is probably Adventitious buds. The plantlets can develop on intact leaves or on injured one. Back to Begonia, this phenomenon usually occurs on injured leaves, so, probably, the plant was injured during movement/by insect or by other means and because of this started to create plantlets.


1

All photosynthesis reaction does need chlorophyll,even in cyanobacteria and algae the difference is the type of chlorophyll ( which depends on available wavelength of light and energy efficiency ) fully parasite plants on the other hand doesn't contain chlorophyll and this force them to live as parasites ( keep in mind that we do have half parasitic plants ...


1

The uptake system in plants is much more complicated, as Mr.Baily opened the anatomy and structure of root I will only explain the uptaking system. When plant absorbs water it absorbs some elements too, but there is a broblem which is soil particles as the clay is a cloidical substance of soil wich does contain negative charge and most of essential elements ...



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