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7

It's Echinacea. I've linked to one site but if you run an images search with Echinacea as the search term you'll see lots of examples. And here is the WP page. Supplementary Echinacea are members of the Compositae. The flower (the head) in your picture is actually made up of lots of individual smaller flowers (i.e. it is a composite flower). The petals ...


5

There is absolutely no way to tell to be honest because mulberry trees have the capability of changing sex (reference). From a paper titled "Diversification of mulberry (Morus indica var. S36), a vegetatively propagated tree species", I quote The sex expression of plants appears to be a function of hormonal control; there seems to be evidence that ...


5

They are basically conjoined apples which share a common stalk. They are rare but do happen. Here is an article of one discovered in a backyard. conjoined apple discovered in a store (reference) It apparently happens because of bad weather conditions, stress and insect damage. Fused fruits are also found in the case of cherries, watermelons, peaches ...


4

It's a Brown-belted Bumble Bee (Bombus griseocollis). Details: http://bugguide.net/node/view/3538


3

Monstera deliciosa seems to fit the bill. From Wikipedia: This member of the arum family Araceae is an epiphyte with aerial roots... Wild seedlings grow towards the darkest area they can find until they find a tree trunk, then start to grow up towards the light, creeping up the tree.[6][dead reference link] Fruit The fruit of ...


3

Everything has a life span. When it comes to trees, there are significant variations between species (see here some examples). Apart from the external factors, these variations seem to be related to telomeres length and telomerase activity [1]: The results from this study support the hypothesis that both increased telomere length and telomerase activity ...


3

This looks like some species of Phytolacca to me. It's possibly Phytolacca americana, which is native to the US (in fact it's an enthusiastic 'volunteer' in my garden) but naturalized in Europe. If you still have any in the ground, once they ripen, the berries are intensely purple and can be used as dye (or even eaten?) Mark A. Nienaber & John W. ...


3

That is a woody compound umbel. A compound umbel is one with more than one set of pedicels between the peduncle and the flower. Hydrangeas also exhibit this type of inflorescence, although not necessarily woody. In the picture below, I've marked all the levels where the pedicels branch. End of peduncle, beginning of primary pedicels Beginning of secondary ...


2

I could not find any scientific papers that have done research into this phenomenon but the general reason given for wilted flowers to being resuscitated is given as the hot water being absorbed faster and I quote Florists use warm water only for resuscitating wilted flowers, because warm water is absorbed quickly. For restoring wilted stems, hot water ...


2

Sterile flowers enrich pollination quality by promoting pollen export and import, while limiting the mating costs of geitonogamy associated with large fertile displays. You are actually looking for this paper: Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3523656/ Sterile flowers increase pollinator attraction and promote female success in the ...


2

The answer to this could be that there are many factors contributing to the length of the life of tree species. Climate: You can see that trees that have a reputation of becoming really old live in environments that have low moisture levels and much sunlight over the course of the year. For example, you can see that the most long-lived trees in America ...


1

While it's always possible that a mutated eggplant will produce a new toxin, this is very unlikely. I don't know how much higher the mutation rate is near Fukushima than in general but the difference can't be huge. Even if it's, say, 5 or 10 times higher than normal (I'm making up these numbers), the risk is still tiny. Actually, plant breeders sometimes use ...


1

Dr Karl Niklas from the Cornell University has written a book about the effects of factors that influenced the shape of early trees. He created a computer model in which he drew trees in the shape that favored particular characteristics. When Niklas favored plants that could gather light from the sun, they had non-overlapping horizontal branches. When ...


1

The seedless grape technically has a seed, but the seed has no hard outer shell and is microscopic/invisible. These seeds aren't viable. Technically you could isolate out the seed tissue from the grape and grow it in specialized germination medium, but that process also works for any other part of the grape plant. Hooray cuttings! Certainly the seedless ...


1

Cypress swamps are an example of tree like plants in lakes. There is even a lake in Louisiana called Cypress Lake


1

The question of 'why are there no/few aquatic trees' can be approached in two ways. 1) Why are land trees tall? 2) Is it harder to be tall in a lake? Land trees are tall to shade competitors and spread their seeds and fruits. To get tall, they need extensive root structures to anchor and provide enough water to the trunk. If there are no competitors to ...


1

Some Differences are listed here Please consider reading these articles (article 1, article 2)



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