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8

If you do a Google Image search with the picture in the question, you'll see the screenshot is from the 2000 movie The Patriot starring Mel Gibson. The movie's filming locations were mainly scattered around South Carolina, on the southern East Coast of the United States. I've spent a lot of time in the region, and the gray-ish fluffy stuff hanging off the ...


5

It looks like a Red Campion, which is native to northern and central Europe. It would be nice to see a close-up of the calyx (which is usually striped) and the leaves to be sure; it may be a cross between a White and Red Campion. There are many members of the genus, and many look alike. Your close-up is of a male flower (anthers only). The plants are ...


5

It looks like sustained or consistent moisture might be (at least part of) the phenological cue for flowering: The wikipedia article mentions that consistent humidity will induce flowering in at least some species and cites Fernández-Alonso & Groenendijk (2004), which says: It generally flowers after the rainy periods, but in humid pastures and ...


4

It's a nice question, I've tried looking for research papers to no avail. But I will add a few things that I hope will help: Firstly, tap water's composition is quite different from rain water- two criteria for distinction that come to mind would be pH and TDS, details follow: Tap water has a higher TDS (total dissolved solids)than rain water, making ...


2

It's just a variant of kale, part of the genus Brassica. I think you'd call this particular variant redbor or purple, bluntly, but you could go further because kale is often classified by the type of leaf. So in your picture, curly 'redbor' or 'purple' kale. This is your specific name: Brassica oleracea Acephala Group. (just sort of look at wikipedia)


2

This is a moss of the genus polytrichum, most likely it is P. commune or P. formosum


2

Tap water does contain a significant amount of metal ions in solution, and this applies to all water sources (rainwater, groundwater) with the exception of ultrapure (eg distilled or reverse osmosis water). For example, the official analysis of the NYC water supply in 2015 shows that there are significant quantities of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in ...


2

Looks kind of like a species in the genus Silene. Interesting group, I believe some species in this group are dioecious and have sex chromosomes.


2

Flaccidity in plant cells The failure to display turgidity especially as seen with plant cells. The suspension of cells from plants in isotonic solutions results in the state termed flaccidity. On a cellular level it represents a lack of pressure of the plasma membrane against the plant cell wall. A more extreme state, termed plasmolysis, is seen ...


2

We can consider two processes that a seed might care about: (1) Ordinary chemical reactions that just happen in the cytoplasm of the seed cells. It's very hard to stop chemistry! Even in the freezer, chemical reactions occur (slowly). This is why long-term storage of biological specimens is generally in an ultra-cold freezer (-80C). Chemical reactions could ...


1

Trichomes can serve the purpose you ask about, but certainly not only that. They also appear on a great many other, some very delicate, plants from many different habitats. Decreasing water loss is only one of a number of different functions they might serve. But with respect to xerophytic plants, trichomes are still a projection from the leaf surface and ...



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