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6

This looks pretty much like Buddleja davidii to me. They are available in a range of different colors, see this image from the Wikipedia:


5

Howe and Smallwood (1982) provide a nice review of the many methods of seed dispersal that have evolved in plants. The review is broad but they do have a section on frugivory. They highlight hypotheses developed by McKey, and Howe and Estabrook (see Howe and Smallwood for citations) that suggest plants may use one of two strategies. One strategy is the ...


5

Dried grains are very mostly viable means they are in a dormant state until and unless suitable condition are provided. More dried it will be viable for longer. In fact there are seed found in Siberia which are ~32,000 years ans still viable. Courtesy: National Geographic Source: US Emergency Supply: Introduction to Seed Viability


4

Your plant appears to be Chionanthus pubescens, the pink fringe tree, which is native to Ecuador and Peru. The genus has a number of species. It belongs to the family Oleaceae, which includes well known plants like jasmine, forsythia, ash trees and olives. I could not find much biological information on the pink fringe tree but plantlist.org contains a ...


4

Is the necessary that stamens have two microsporangia per theca? No. Many species in Cryptocarya group of Lauraceae have microsporangia that have fused such that they have only two microsporangia instead of the typical four (Rohwer et al. 2014). I interpret their description as saying that the microsporangia within a theca but it's not clearly stated as ...


4

It reminds me of the smooth-barked Australian gum trees / eucalyptus, like a salmon gum, ghost gum, etc. Although there are no squirrels in Australia :) This photo of a Salmon Gum is from http://www.fpc.wa.gov.au/content_migration/plantations/species/arid/salmon_gum.aspx


3

The plant looks like Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) to me, a common "weed" in the U.S.


2

This question is related to the question: Why are some things transparent and others opaque? Being able to see something requires that it is opaque and that sufficient light illuminates it. UV and shorter wavelengths are not as prevalent as visible light on earth. The world would appear too dark to see if we used UV and shorter wavelengths. This is ...


2

Cattles actually hate shrubs which are very tough to break and tasteless(for a cow). Some plants they won't touch are: Lantana urticoides (West Indian shrub verbena), Malvaviscus arboreus var.drummondii (wax mallow) Rhus copallinum (winged sumac) Viburnum acerifolium (mapleleaf viburnum). Morella cerifera (wax myrtle) Ilex vomitoria (yaupon). Source: ...


1

Fertilizer on tomatoes wouldn't make sense. Tomatoes are up above the soil, and fertilizer is usually applied to the soil before the plants sprout, but I've never seen an industrial tomato farm, so maybe they do spray fertilizer afterwards, but I would think pesticides or herbicides would be more likely. Fertilizer on carrots would make more sense, since ...


1

You could use this key to the genus. The differences between both species should become obvious when tracing back the decision tree. It seems that they can be distinguished mainly by the leaf size/shape of adult plants.


1

The minerals will stay behind. They are too heavy to be transported via the vacuoles of MOST, and most must be stressed when dealing with plants, plants during transpiration. Though the water-soluble compounds- including the volatile compounds mentioned like terpenes and even flavonoids will and can exit during transpiration. Terpenes are not bad for humans, ...


1

It will depend a bit on the specimen of tree / plant that is doing the transpiration. Minerals will typically stay behind during evaporation, but volatile compounds (think the minty smell of Eucalyptus) would evaporate at the same time as the water, and might condense (in some concentration) at the same time as well; this will depend a bit on the temperature ...


1

In nature, species compete for resources like water, light, nutrients, etc. and need to find 'their place' in this struggle. According to niche theory, every species occupies a certain spot in the multidimensional niche space (the dimensions describe the number of environmental factors) where it performs better than any other species. If there would not be ...


1

I know a genetics professor that found the reason for the juvenile leaf into a adult, a gene (151) in the RNA. He is presently working on what factor that promotes this to happen.



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