Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

22

Ripening of bananas is induced by ethylene (see reference 1), which acts as a hormone and induces the ripening process. The incomplete combustion of the leaves produces ethylene, additionally the warmth of the process will help the enzymes as well. There is even a paper about this technique (although it is unfortunately not accessible), see reference 2 for ...


3

This study of the recently sequenced pine species states that 82% of genome is repetitive. This is characteristic of any complex genome, including humans. Such sequences have often been considered "junk DNA", though any scientist will tell you that just because we don't know its purpose doesn't mean it doesn't have one. That said, a good portion of repeats ...


2

The difference has to do with the concept of "thinning and heading" and how plants respond to abiotic damage. Thinning refers to the removal of a branch or shoot all the way back to the node which it originated from. This is the primary type of pruning used on trees - either to limit growth or to increase the amount of light permeating to lower branches. ...


2

There are biogeochemical cycles for the building stones of the biomass (e.g. hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, etc...), so all of these atoms are recycled. To recycle them the organisms need energy, which they get from sunlight, from chemical materials, etc... (check microbial metabolism for further details). Plants use sunlight as energy source, CO2 from ...


2

The matter in plants is mostly carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen, with various metal ions and some sulfur and phosphorus. The carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen are taken from carbon dioxide in the air and water from the soil through photosynthesis. Nitrogen is taken up from the soil as ammonia or nitrates, or fixed from nitrogen gas, but this only happens in ...


2

Not to forget that simple cross breeding your plants the Mendelian way also modifies their genetic make up, as @souvik bhattacharya indicates in his comment. No equipment necessary, no chemicals, no ethical issues.


1

Trees have different kinds of bark. If your tree was not moist and seeping, it had bark. Since that tree is clearly alive, it's likely that it has a smooth, light-colored naturally peeling bark. Japanese Stewartia (Stewartia pseudocamillia) has a beautiful bark that is constantly shedding in patches of tan, green, orange and brown. It always has bark, ...


1

The biomass of crops is definitely mostly carbon (from the air in the form of CO2) and water. However, in terms of how it affects the environment: Crops use up trace elements that make up a tiny fraction of the biomass, but it is these trace elements that are not ubiquitously available. Most notably phosphorus and to a lesser extent nitrogen. The impact on ...


1

Well maybe I'm confused, but do plants not produce tannins? If they do does the production of the tannins stop after death? That depends on how you define death. Tannin is secondary product, so I don't think the plant cells will produce more tannin when they are starving probably because of cutting off the leaves, roots, etc... when the plant dies. ...


1

I am assuming that you understand this basic structure- Now, let's start with grana which are small discrete dark green bodies embedded in lighter coloured stroma... But, in evolutionarily primitive life forms like algae, there is no differentiation among individual granum....rather they consist of continuous layer or lamellae like the sheets of book ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible