Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

There was a 2011 study where they used a sensitive atomic magnetometer to try to detect a plant's magnetic field. They stated that: To our knowledge, no one has yet detected the magnetic field from a plant. Biochemical processes, in the form of ionic flows and time varying ionic distributions, generate electrical currents and time-varying electric ...


5

"Teleology is like a mistress to a biologist: he cannot live without her but he's unwilling to be seen with her in public." - J.B.S. Haldane (1892 - 1964) I can't tell you why Lapidaria margaretae looks like 'stones'. But I can deduce something from the way this plant looks. First and foremost, I can say this plant probably evolved in an arid region, ...


4

I would like to add from my random-seminar experience that there are magnetic bacteria, that orient along magnetic field due to magnetosomes, e.g. Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum. Please look into Wiki article. So one can imagine symbiotic association between plant and such bacteria. More to OP's question, remember that any electric current (aka moving ...


4

Without more detail about the whole plant (including leaves), where it came from, and about whether or not it was spray-painted, watered with dyed water, etc. it would be difficult to ID. It seems to be in the Asteraceae family, and in the pompon class, as seen in these vender's pictures. (Disclosure: I have no affiliation with the company.) ...


3

Ventricaria ventricosa (previously called Valonia ventricosa) is not exactly a single cell. It has a coenocytic structure with multiple nuclei and chloroplasts. As Jasand Pruski correctly guessed the organism possesses a large central vacuole which is multilobular in structure (lobules radiating from a central spheroid region). The entire cell contains ...


3

I cannot say anything about the general case, or specifically for day-neutral plants. However, Sforza et al. (2012) have studied the effects of light conditions on algae (used for biofuel production), and their results indicate several problems with continuous light. In continuous light conditions they find lower chlorophyll contents and higher carotenoid ...


2

Ignoring parameters such as: Leaf shapes Difference in photosynthetic efficiency due to other metabolic factors Unequal illumination of leaves Nutrient content of the soil Photosynthesis rate of a plant1 depends on the [total number of leaves] × [surface area of a leaf]. Assuming that a tree occupies same ground area as a shrub, there will be same ...


1

Perhaps the answer is in natural selection. Over many generations, if these plants are constantly exposed to the same virus, one of them may obtain a mutation or something similar that allows it to be resistant, thus that plant will have higher survival and growth rate and thus more seeds. The current plant itself may also adapt to the presence of this ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible