New answers tagged

0

That's a super low pH, and I kinda doubt it's real. If you used a cheap home test, it's more likely analytic error (not necessarily your fault, it's just a hard thing to measure) than a real result. 4.0 pH is lower than most plants can tolerate--it's in the range of vinegar. Most plants (I have no experience with this species) prefer a slightly acidic soil, ...


4

It looks like sustained or consistent moisture might be (at least part of) the phenological cue for flowering: The wikipedia article mentions that consistent humidity will induce flowering in at least some species and cites Fernández-Alonso & Groenendijk (2004), which says: It generally flowers after the rainy periods, but in humid pastures and ...


2

It's a nice question, I've tried looking for research papers to no avail. But I will add a few things that I hope will help: Firstly, tap water's composition is quite different from rain water- two criteria for distinction that come to mind would be pH and TDS, details follow: Tap water has a higher TDS (total dissolved solids)than rain water, making ...


2

It's just a variant of kale, part of the genus Brassica. I think you'd call this particular variant redbor or purple, bluntly, but you could go further because kale is often classified by the type of leaf. So in your picture, curly 'redbor' or 'purple' kale. This is your specific name: Brassica oleracea Acephala Group. (just sort of look at wikipedia)


2

This is a moss of the genus polytrichum, most likely it is P. commune or P. formosum


5

It looks like a Red Campion, which is native to northern and central Europe. It would be nice to see a close-up of the calyx (which is usually striped) and the leaves to be sure; it may be a cross between a White and Red Campion. There are many members of the genus, and many look alike. Your close-up is of a male flower (anthers only). The plants are ...


2

Looks kind of like a species in the genus Silene. Interesting group, I believe some species in this group are dioecious and have sex chromosomes.


-1

Most plants growing in salt water have some sort of excretion mechanism, mostly through special glands on the leaves. Some species of mangrove, like aegiceras, aegialitis, acanthus and avicennia use this mechanism. However, not all species possess these type of glands and therefore must have other ways, like active filtration or selective transportation see ...


2

Tap water does contain a significant amount of metal ions in solution, and this applies to all water sources (rainwater, groundwater) with the exception of ultrapure (eg distilled or reverse osmosis water). For example, the official analysis of the NYC water supply in 2015 shows that there are significant quantities of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in ...


0

Any soil microbiology textbook will tell you that there are a great number of fungi in most soils. I believe there are 12 or 13 species of non-legumes capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen. Podocarpus is one of them. Look at the roots of podocarpus and you will see nodules all along the roots.


0

If you did enough replications in your experiment, you could harvest one or more plants and measure fresh weight, and then gently oven dry for about 48 hours at like 160 degrees F and then take a dry weight as a measure of biomass. I don't know a non-destructive way to do it. A lesser alternative would be to measure plant height and number of leaves, though ...


0

I like the reference book Plant Physiological Ecology for stuff like this. I know one of the authors is Thijs Pons. When temperatures become high, plants may close the stomates to conserve moisture. When the stomates are open, usually in daylight hours, the open stomates allow CO2 to enter the leaf. This carbon is needed to form glucose and many other ...


0

You may find it an interesting sidelight that in many plants with potassium deficiency, we see necrotic leaf spots or leaf tip or marginal burn. The plant can't adequately close the stomates, so you get localized dessication in the leaf and therefore necrotic leaf spots. In this way, drought stress and potassium deficiency are somewhat related.


0

Mature, viable seeds have to form in most fruits, which involves the maturation of embryonic tissue. That can take a little time, from just a few days in some weed species to months and perhaps longer in some fruits like pineapple.


0

There is a bougainvillea variety called 'Surprise', which puts out bracts either white or magenta in color, though I believe all of the actual flowers are white.


0

An asymetrical number of petals might offer an advantage: when wind blows there is a clear direction of rotation. Thus the flower turns in one direction only. There is less oscillation that could damage the flower.


0

In addition to the above answer : Carbon dioxide : Increase in CO2 level in the atmosphere over 0.03 % causes stomatal closure and results in decrease of transpiration.


2

Flaccidity in plant cells The failure to display turgidity especially as seen with plant cells. The suspension of cells from plants in isotonic solutions results in the state termed flaccidity. On a cellular level it represents a lack of pressure of the plasma membrane against the plant cell wall. A more extreme state, termed plasmolysis, is seen ...


2

We can consider two processes that a seed might care about: (1) Ordinary chemical reactions that just happen in the cytoplasm of the seed cells. It's very hard to stop chemistry! Even in the freezer, chemical reactions occur (slowly). This is why long-term storage of biological specimens is generally in an ultra-cold freezer (-80C). Chemical reactions could ...


1

Trichomes can serve the purpose you ask about, but certainly not only that. They also appear on a great many other, some very delicate, plants from many different habitats. Decreasing water loss is only one of a number of different functions they might serve. But with respect to xerophytic plants, trichomes are still a projection from the leaf surface and ...


8

If you do a Google Image search with the picture in the question, you'll see the screenshot is from the 2000 movie The Patriot starring Mel Gibson. The movie's filming locations were mainly scattered around South Carolina, on the southern East Coast of the United States. I've spent a lot of time in the region, and the gray-ish fluffy stuff hanging off the ...


0

Dead wood is indeed very important to the food chain, and to the ecology and biodiversity of a forest. Lots of biota depend on the presence of dead wood; many species of insects and fungi only live on dead wood. See for example this study of fungi in Danish Beech forests. The amount of dead wood present depends, apart from management, on the type of forest, ...



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