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genetic modification can be done with mutations. A mutation is a permanent change in the sequence of DNA. In order to obtain an observable effect, mutations must occur in gene exons, or regulatory elements. Changes in the non-coding regions of DNA (introns and junk DNA) generally do not affect function. Mutations can be caused by: external (exogenous) ...


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Most varieties of corn bred for modern use have between 8-20 rows of kernels (Bommert et al. 2013.. Nearly all varieties have an even number of kernel rows. This is due to the early development of the ear. Ears of corn are developed from pistillate flowers on the ear (Bortiri and Hake 2007). Pistillate flowers are the female flowers, so they will bear ...


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Yes it is. The easiest plant to transform would be Arabidopsis, which can be transformed by agrobacterium using the floral dip method. The process would be as follows: 1. Design a gene sequence you wish to insert into the plant 2. Synthesize (or otherwise acquire the DNA) 3. Insert the DNA into your agrobacterium, at home you would use a cold snap ...


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I think this might be Japanese hops. Well, what I have in my yard is Japanese hops. As I said, it's horrible. Description and Biology: Plant: herbaceous annual, twining, shallow-rooted vine that can climb to heights of ten or more feet with the help of rough-textured stems covered with short, sharp, downward pointing prickles that can be very ...


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Wintercreeper, Euonymus fortunei Given that you're just over in Illinois, here's the page from our Plant Finder database. In regards to your second question, this factsheet from UMich mentions (and gives citations) for its use as a medicine. Given that, I'd avoid eating it if I were you, but there's not mention of it being especially toxic.


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Your plant appears to be Chionanthus pubescens, the pink fringe tree, which is native to Ecuador and Peru. The genus has a number of species. It belongs to the family Oleaceae, which includes well known plants like jasmine, forsythia, ash trees and olives. I could not find much biological information on the pink fringe tree but plantlist.org contains a ...


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I know a genetics professor that found the reason for the juvenile leaf into a adult, a gene (151) in the RNA. He is presently working on what factor that promotes this to happen.


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The minerals will stay behind. They are too heavy to be transported via the vacuoles of MOST, and most must be stressed when dealing with plants, plants during transpiration. Though the water-soluble compounds- including the volatile compounds mentioned like terpenes and even flavonoids will and can exit during transpiration. Terpenes are not bad for humans, ...


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Fertilizer on tomatoes wouldn't make sense. Tomatoes are up above the soil, and fertilizer is usually applied to the soil before the plants sprout, but I've never seen an industrial tomato farm, so maybe they do spray fertilizer afterwards, but I would think pesticides or herbicides would be more likely. Fertilizer on carrots would make more sense, since ...


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The rhizosphere is the narrow region of soil that is directly influenced by root secretions and associated soil microorganisms (wiki) And endorrhiza (also termed Endomycorrhiza, AMS or AM) is a special case of the mycorrhiza, a mutualistic relationship between fungi and plant roots, where the fungus cells are stored within the root and not on its surface.


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You could use this key to the genus. The differences between both species should become obvious when tracing back the decision tree. It seems that they can be distinguished mainly by the leaf size/shape of adult plants.



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