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2

The difference has to do with the concept of "thinning and heading" and how plants respond to abiotic damage. Thinning refers to the removal of a branch or shoot all the way back to the node which it originated from. This is the primary type of pruning used on trees - either to limit growth or to increase the amount of light permeating to lower branches. ...


3

Binomial names often use of greek words. Phyllum means -- as you correctly stated -- "leaf", but is not derived from latin but from the greek φύλλον, 'phyllon'. By the way, there are also lots of examples where the latin word 'folium' is used. To stick with the genus Acer from your example, there is another species named Acer gracilifolium. So don't be ...


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The closest we have come to achieving this was probably when the J. Craig Venter institute made a synthetic bacteria. They produced the genome for the smallest simplest bacteria they could find and it still took a large team of researchers several years and a LOT of money. Building a plant would be exponentially more difficult. What complicates this is ...


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As Chris mentioned in his comment, 'printing' DNA from scratch (i.e. synthesizing a long strand de novo) is expensive and difficult. Unfortunately, the process of GMO creation is not as simple as assembling a beautiful DNA sequence on the computer, printing it, and then inserting it into a cell. Here's a related question about de novo sequencing. Plant ...


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Here is a listing of a bunch of different butterfly bushes in all their glory! http://www.naturehills.com/bushes-and-shrubs/butterfly-bushes http://www.naturehills.com/about-garden-plants/about-butterfly-bush


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First of all there is no solanine in green tomato, there wasn't, and there never will be. Steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) extracted from tomato leaves and berries (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were separated and identified using optimized reversed-phase liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization (ESI) and ion trap mass spectrometry ...


3

Not "all of them". But yes, plants suck up water from the soil, with everything dissolved in this water - nutrients, heavy metals, poisons. And also they breathe air, and absorb stuff via this route. There probably are some toxins which will not enter the plant, because their molecules are too large and/or fragile. For example, should a plant root come in ...


4

You can have a look to the most basal branches and you may get a pretty good idea of what those early plants looked like. What we call plants is what we call plantae or Archaeplastida in Latin. This clade contains the red algae and the green algae. Within the green algae are the land plants. In the land plants are the embryophyta which contain all what you ...


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You can see the wikipedia article on meristem. The apical meristem differentiates into floral meristem that gives rise to flowers. From this the cells specifically expressing APETALA3 (AP3), PISTILLATA (PI), AGAMOUS (AG) and SEPALLATA (SEP) would give rise to the stamen [ref]. CRC gene is essential for female development and plants lacking this will not ...


6

There is no color code for the leafs - the color results from biochemical reactions. Basically there are three colors: Green, yellow and red. Green color is caused by the chlorophyll inside the chloroplasts, when the leafs are active in photosynthesis. Yellow color is caused by Carotenoids, which are present in the leafs all the time, but are masked by the ...


2

What There are two theories according to Jennifer Wells, Leaf Color Change: Competition theory - states that nutrients are redistributed to important parts of the plant. Lack of nutrients in the leaves will decrease the chlorophyll synthesis thus the leaves change their color. The redistribution does not happen equally that's why some leaves are ...



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