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3

I found a paper investigating the mechanism of glyphosate resistance in Conyza canadensis. They used 31P NMR to investigate the fate of the glyphosate in vivo. What they found is that the resistant plants are able to transport glyphosate into the vacuole: The following view of horseweed resistance to glyphosate emerges from the data presented herein. ...


1

From Whittle and Johnston (2006): Specifically, human epidemiological data and/or nucleotide substitution rates of selectively neutral DNA (which equals the mutation rate, Kimura, 1983; Miyata et al., 1987) have shown that more mutations occur in the male than in the female germ line for numerous animal taxa (e.g. humans, mice, chickens, and sheep) and ...


1

D-Glucose and L-Glucose have similar names only because we humans decided that's how we should name sugars; they have as much in common as, for example, D-Glucose and D-Allose (one chiral bond is different). So, in essence, organisms don't synthesize L-Glucose for the same reason they don't synthesize D-Allose: they have no use for it. Its similarity to ...


2

Well, that depends on your home. ;) I think it is not an easy process. There are two main methods that are used to genetically modify plants: Using the bacterium, Agrobacterium tumifaciens, as a vector for the DNA. Agrobacterium has the ability to infect plants and insert DNA into a plant's genome. It causes crown gall tumours in natural infections. This ...


1

Yes, It is. I found this Awesome video on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MiZ35pkxG-k How to do: Materials: Planter Soil Table Salt Seeds(fern) Petri Dish Vinegar Water 1.5V Battery Wire Human hair with follicles Procedure: In a pertri plate add 10mL of Vinegar with 0.1g Salt. Mix the seeds to the solution Put the human hair ...


1

I suspect the answer to this, is that in looking at agricultural fruits you are looking at plants that have been the subject of artificial selection, and the tree vs vine thing is a practical limit, but not the driving factor... for instance a jack fruit grows on tree and is watermelon sized... I think if you look at something like a pumpkin, you will ...


4

Monstera deliciosa seems to fit the bill. From Wikipedia: This member of the arum family Araceae is an epiphyte with aerial roots... Wild seedlings grow towards the darkest area they can find until they find a tree trunk, then start to grow up towards the light, creeping up the tree.[6][dead reference link] Fruit The fruit of ...


1

Some Differences are listed here Please consider reading these articles (article 1, article 2)


8

They are basically conjoined apples which share a common stalk. They are rare but do happen. Here is an article of one discovered in a backyard. conjoined apple discovered in a store (reference) It apparently happens because of bad weather conditions, stress and insect damage. Fused fruits are also found in the case of cherries, watermelons, peaches ...


4

It's a Brown-belted Bumble Bee (Bombus griseocollis). Details: http://bugguide.net/node/view/3538


7

It's Echinacea. I've linked to one site but if you run an images search with Echinacea as the search term you'll see lots of examples. And here is the WP page. Supplementary Echinacea are members of the Compositae. The flower (the head) in your picture is actually made up of lots of individual smaller flowers (i.e. it is a composite flower). The petals ...


1

While it's always possible that a mutated eggplant will produce a new toxin, this is very unlikely. I don't know how much higher the mutation rate is near Fukushima than in general but the difference can't be huge. Even if it's, say, 5 or 10 times higher than normal (I'm making up these numbers), the risk is still tiny. Actually, plant breeders sometimes use ...


2

Sterile flowers enrich pollination quality by promoting pollen export and import, while limiting the mating costs of geitonogamy associated with large fertile displays. You are actually looking for this paper: Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3523656/ Sterile flowers increase pollinator attraction and promote female success in the ...


3

Everything has a life span. When it comes to trees, there are significant variations between species (see here some examples). Apart from the external factors, these variations seem to be related to telomeres length and telomerase activity [1]: The results from this study support the hypothesis that both increased telomere length and telomerase activity ...


2

The answer to this could be that there are many factors contributing to the length of the life of tree species. Climate: You can see that trees that have a reputation of becoming really old live in environments that have low moisture levels and much sunlight over the course of the year. For example, you can see that the most long-lived trees in America ...


3

This looks like some species of Phytolacca to me. It's possibly Phytolacca americana, which is native to the US (in fact it's an enthusiastic 'volunteer' in my garden) but naturalized in Europe. If you still have any in the ground, once they ripen, the berries are intensely purple and can be used as dye (or even eaten?) Mark A. Nienaber & John W. ...


0

Synthesis from chemicals in organisms is fundamentally different from laboratory synthesis of chemicals. In the latter, more than one chemical species or other unwanted byproducts are usually formed, whist living organisms use enzymes, that are often stereo-specific. This means that they usually can bind, in the case, produce, only one stereo-isomer. To ...


-2

Plants in drier conditions usually have reduced surface area, thick waxy cuticle covering the epidermis, reduced number of stomata, and water storage tissues that presides in its roots and leaves. This means that even if the plants are similar, one of them might express more of one of the features shown above.


5

There is absolutely no way to tell to be honest because mulberry trees have the capability of changing sex (reference). From a paper titled "Diversification of mulberry (Morus indica var. S36), a vegetatively propagated tree species", I quote The sex expression of plants appears to be a function of hormonal control; there seems to be evidence that ...


3

That is a woody compound umbel. A compound umbel is one with more than one set of pedicels between the peduncle and the flower. Hydrangeas also exhibit this type of inflorescence, although not necessarily woody. In the picture below, I've marked all the levels where the pedicels branch. End of peduncle, beginning of primary pedicels Beginning of secondary ...


2

I could not find any scientific papers that have done research into this phenomenon but the general reason given for wilted flowers to being resuscitated is given as the hot water being absorbed faster and I quote Florists use warm water only for resuscitating wilted flowers, because warm water is absorbed quickly. For restoring wilted stems, hot water ...



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