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In short: yes, a plant have to have leaves to produce a fruit. Both from the evolutionary viewpoint as from the anatomical viewpoint. All the fruit producing plants belong to a group we call Anthophyta (or Magnoliophyta), meaning in greek "plants with flowers". These fruit producing plants are all descendant from ancestors that have leaves, specifically ...


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No. Cactuses Who hasn't heard of these leafless plants? But they undoubtedly do produce fruit - which is edible what's more. So the answer? No. Some plants can and do produce fruit without leaves.


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According to http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/whatever-you-do-do-not-eat-touch-or-even-inhale-the-air-around-the-manchineel-tree, it evolved to be poisonous to discourage animals from digging into it. Here's one possible way that could have happened. It was once only a tiny speck more poisonous than other trees by random fluctuations in toxicity. By ...


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To me, it looks like a species of Taxus (Yew), for instance Taxus baccata. This is based on the flat needles, "flat" apparence/growth of the branches and the red berries. It's a bit hard to see what the red things are in your 3rd picture though (berries, shoots, flowers??). It should also have reddish bark where you can easily peal of loose scales. They can ...


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Those are root nodules. They grow on root of plants (primarily Fabaceae) . They aren't harmful (but I'm not recommending to eat them). They are natural adaptation that ensures the plant's survival. They are important because they store water too for the plant during periods of drought. Root Nodule [UPDATE] About the plant's specie, well, I can't ...



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