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Short answer: no, there is no fixed frame rate or frame-based processing in mammalian vision. Photons arriving at the photoreceptors at the back of the human retina interact with photo-sensitive pigments called opsins, and modulate their release of the neurotransmitter glutamate . The level of glutamate released from a photoreceptor then changes the ...


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Ok, let's talk about mammalian neocortex rather than about the entire central nervous system. The vast majority of synapses within the cortex are formed between neurons within the same cortical area (Binzegger et al 2004). Although most of these synapses will not be self-connections (from a single neuron back to itself), they are recurrent in the sense that ...


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You can do qPCR for certain markers from the extract. GFAP for astrocytes, Tuj1 for neurons, Myelin for oligodendrocytes etc and calculate their percentages to have an estimate of the relative populations. If you are quite used to microscopy and studying these cells then you can identify the different populations of cells with normal light microscopy as ...


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Edit: Added two studies to better show how different types of imagination tasks use different parts of the brain. Imagination is a complex process that can use many regions of the brain. Insights into how our brain imagines have been gained through a number of studies. There is not an "imagination" area of the brain. Instead, different areas, and often ...


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While in human made cameras light sensor and any image processor are separate devices, in the living eye the first steps image analysis begin in retina already as light sensing cells are part of the nervous system. The optic nerve carries pre-processed information and not the encoded original image to the brain. This pre-processed information is not ...


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The brain is separated into different regions, and different regions perform different tasks Not really. This kind of claims stem from the early brain research, where every area was thought to specialize in one particular task. Sure, some categorization is possible (e.g. where the visual input is mostly processed). However, your question is basically an ...


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We don't know yet in detail how different cortical areas are wired up, so it's difficult to say to what extent the wiring differs. But the overall structure of different cortical areas is remarkably similar, in terms of the layers of cortex and their cellular components. Certainly the structure of the input is very different between cortical areas, and ...



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